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List of 1930s jazz standards

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A Caucasian man in his thirties is sitting behind a piano facing left. He has short, dark hair and is wearing a suit jacket, a white shirt and a necktie. He is looking down at a music sheet before him and points to it with his left hand. Another man is standing on his right, also wearing a suit, white shirt and a necktie. He is bent slightly toward the man on the left and looking at him, appearing concentrated in thinking. His eyes are half-closed and his left arm raised as if he was holding a glass.
Richard Rodgers (left) and Lorenz Hart were responsible for a large number of 1930s standards, including "Blue Moon" (1934), "My Romance" (1935) and "My Funny Valentine" (1937).

Jazz standards are musical compositions that are widely known, performed and recorded by jazz artists as part of the genre's musical repertoire. This list includes compositions written in the 1930s that are considered standards by at least one major fake book publication or reference work. Some of the tunes listed were already well known standards by the 1940s, while others were popularized later. Where appropriate, the years when the most influential recordings of a song were made are indicated in the list.

Broadway theatre contributed some of the most popular standards of the 1930s, including George and Ira Gershwin's "Summertime" (1935), Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart's "My Funny Valentine" (1937) and Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's "All the Things You Are" (1939). These songs still rank among the most recorded standards.[1] Johnny Green's "Body and Soul" was used in a Broadway show and became a hit after Coleman Hawkins's 1939 recording. It is the most recorded jazz standard of all time.[2]

In the 1930s, swing jazz emerged as a dominant form in American music. Duke Ellington and his band members composed numerous swing era hits that have become standards: "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)" (1932), "Sophisticated Lady" (1933) and "Caravan" (1936), among others. Other influential bandleaders of this period were Benny Goodman, Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway and Fletcher Henderson. Goodman's band became well-known from the radio show Let's Dance and in 1937 introduced a number of jazz standards to a wide audience in the first jazz concert performed in Carnegie Hall.[3]

1930

A man in his late thirties is sitting sideways on a chair or a couch. He is facing the camera and looking directly at it. The backrest of the chair is on his left side; his right hand is placed on the backrest and his left arm is resting on it. He is smiling.
George Gershwin's songs have gained lasting popularity among both jazz and pop audiences. Among standards composed by him are "The Man I Love" (1924), "Embraceable You" (1930), "I Got Rhythm" (1930) and "Summertime" (1935).

1931

1932

A short-haired black man is sitting behind a piano facing right. He is wearing an opened suit jacket, a white shirt and a necktie. His hands are on the keyboard and he appears to be playing. On the background there is a brick wall on which two paintings or photographs are partly visible.
Virtuoso pianist Art Tatum mostly played Broadway and popular standards. He usually radically reworked the songs and had the ability to make standards sound like new compositions. Tatum's influential piano solos include "Tiger Rag", "Willow Weep for Me" and "Over the Rainbow".

1933

  • "Don't Blame Me"[4][10][73][74] was introduced in the musical revue Clowns in Clover and included in the 1933 film Dinner at Eight. The film is often mistakenly given as the song's origin. The first hit recordings were by Guy Lombardo and Ethel Waters in 1933. Nat King Cole recorded it several times as an instrumental, and had a hit with a 1944 vocal version. Charlie Parker made an influential ballad rendition in 1947. The song was composed by Jimmy McHugh with lyrics by Dorothy Fields.[75]
  • "I Cover the Waterfront", composed by Johnny Green with lyrics by Edward Heyman, was inspired by the 1932 novel of the same name by Max Miller. The song was included in the score of the 1933 film I Cover the Waterfront, and was first recorded by Abe Lyman and His Orchestra. Louis Armstrong, Joe Haymes, Eddy Duchin and composer Green all made recordings of the song in 1933, and Haymes's and Duchin's versions made the pop charts. Billie Holiday recorded the song many times during her career. Art Tatum recorded it as a solo piano piece in 1949 and returned to it several times.[76]
  • "It's Only a Paper Moon"[4][77][78] is a song from the short-lived Broadway show The Great Magoo, composed by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Yip Harburg and Billy Rose. Originally titled "If You Believed in Me", the current title was introduced in the 1933 film Take a Chance. The song first charted in 1933 with Paul Whiteman's and Cliff Edwards's recordings. Nat King Cole recorded a trio performance of it in 1943, and both Ella Fitzgerald and Benny Goodman charted with the song in 1945.[79]
  • "Moonglow"[4][80] is a song composed by Will Hudson and Irving Mills, with lyrics written by Eddie DeLange.
  • "Sophisticated Lady"[4][10][81][82] is a jazz composition by Duke Ellington. Lyrics were later added by Irving Mills and Mitchell Parish. Ellington's recording rose to number three on the charts. Glen Gray and Don Redman also charted with the song in 1933. Lawrence Brown and Toby Hardwick have claimed to have composed parts of the music; according to Stuart Nicholson's Ellington biography, the original composer credits included Ellington, Brown, Hardwick and Mills, but only Ellington was credited when the song was published.[83]
  • "Yesterdays"[4][44][84] was composed by Jerome Kern for the Broadway musical Roberta, with lyrics by Otto Harbach. It was introduced by Irene Dunne. Not as popular in the pop world as "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" from the same musical, it has enjoyed much more success in jazz circles. The song is often associated with Billie Holiday, who recorded it in 1944.[85]

1934

1935

A dark-skinned woman is sitting behind a wooden desk or a counter, facing the camera and looking to the right. She is wearing a winter coat, a hat and large shining earrings. Her right hand is on the desk and there is a thick, shining ring in its ring finger. Behind her on the right hangs a flag with one darkly colored star visible.
Many 1930s standards were popularized by jazz singer Billie Holiday's recordings, including "These Foolish Things", "Embraceable You" and "Yesterdays".

1936

1937

1938

Shep Fields replaced Paul Whiteman with his own network radio show "The Rippling Rhythm Revue" and helped to introduce Thanks for the Memory with Bob Hope in the Paramount Pictures film The Big Broadcast of 1938[157]
Shep Fields replaced Paul Whiteman with his own network radio show "The Rippling Rhythm Revue" and helped to introduce Thanks for the Memory with Bob Hope in the Paramount Pictures film The Big Broadcast of 1938[157]

1939

A Caucasian man in his thirties is standing and playing the clarinet, facing the camera. His dark hair is parted to the side and he is wearing glasses. Both of his hands are on the clarinet and he is blowing into the instrument with his eyes partly closed. There is a microphone on the foreground next to the bell of the clarinet. Several other musicians can be partly seen on the background. In the corner on the right hangs a flag with white and red stripes and white stars on a blue background.
Clarinetist and bandleader Benny Goodman popularized many of the 1930s standards, including "Darn That Dream", "How Deep Is the Ocean", and "Stompin' at the Savoy".
  • "All the Things You Are"[4][10][44][184] is a song from Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II's Broadway musical Very Warm for May. Kern first felt the song, with its constantly shifting tonal centers, was too complex for mass appeal. However, it has enjoyed lasting popularity since then and is now one of the most recorded standards.[185] The song's chord progression has been used for such tunes as "Bird of Paradise" by Charlie Parker and "Prince Albert" by Kenny Dorham.
  • "Darn That Dream"[44][186] was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen for the Broadway musical Swingin' the Dream. Lyrics were written by Eddie DeLange. Although the musical was a disappointment, Benny Goodman's version of the song featuring vocalist Mildred Bailey was a number one hit.[187]
  • "Frenesi"[4][188][189] is a Latin jazz composition by Alberto Dominguez. Originally composed for the marimba, jazz arrangements were later made by Leonard Whitcup and others. A 1940 hit version recorded by Artie Shaw with an arrangement by William Grant Still was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2000.[9]
  • "I Didn't Know What Time It Was"[190] was sung by Richard Kollmar and Marcy Westcott in the Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart musical Too Many Girls. Benny Goodman recorded the first jazz version in 1939 with vocalist Louise Tobin.[191]
  • "I Thought About You"[4][44][192][193] was composed by Jimmy Van Heusen with lyrics by Johnny Mercer. Mildred Bailey recorded the first hit version with the Benny Goodman Orchestra. Guitarist Johnny Smith recorded it in the 1950s for the Roost label. Miles Davis included the song on his 1961 album Someday My Prince Will Come.[194]
  • "In the Mood"[195][196] is a jazz composition by Joe Garland based on Wingy Manone's "Tar Paper Stomp". Andy Razaf wrote the lyrics for the song. Garland recorded "In the Mood" with Edgar Hayes and offered it to Artie Shaw, who never recorded the piece. It was popularized by the Glenn Miller Orchestra in 1939. The final arrangement was the result of work by Garland, Miller, Eddie Durham, and pianist Chummy MacGregor, although only Miller profited from its financial success.[197] The song remains popular and is almost always performed as an instrumental.[198]
  • "Moonlight Serenade"[10][199][200] was composed by Glenn Miller with lyrics by Mitchell Parish. Miller's orchestra used it as their signature tune,[201] and their recording charted at number three in 1939.[202] The song was recorded by rhythm and blues group The Rivieras in 1959.[202] Carly Simon sang it on her 2005 album Moonlight Serenade.[203]
  • "Over the Rainbow"[10][204] is a ballad introduced by Judy Garland in the film The Wizard of Oz, composed by Harold Arlen with lyrics by Yip Harburg. It was an immediate hit: four different versions, including Garland's, rose to top ten within a month after the film's release. An influential piano solo recording was made by Art Tatum in 1955, and a live solo piano recording was released by singer-songwriter Tori Amos in 1996. The song is also known as "Somewhere over the Rainbow".[205]
  • "Something to Live For"[206] is a jazz ballad written by Billy Strayhorn. Based on a poem the composer had written as a teenager,[207] the song was introduced by Duke Ellington's orchestra with composer Strayhorn on the piano. Ellington was co-credited with the composition.[208] The song has been recorded by Ella Fitzgerald, who has called it her favorite song.[209]
  • "What's New?"[4][10][44][210] started out as an instrumental titled "I'm Free", composed by Bob Haggart when he was playing in Bob Crosby's Orchestra, and was later retitled when Johnny Burke wrote lyrics for it. The song was introduced by Crosby, and other hit versions from 1939 include Bing Crosby's and Benny Goodman's renditions.[211] Australian singer Catherine O'Hara recorded the song in 1966 with her own lyrics, also titled "I'm Free".[211]
  • "Woodchopper's Ball"[212] is a jazz composition by Joe Bishop and Woody Herman. Introduced by the Woody Herman Orchestra, it was the band's first and biggest hit selling over a million records.[213][214] The original recording was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2002.[9] The composition is also known as "At the Woodchopper's Ball".[214]

Notes

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  2. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "Body and Soul". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  3. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Jazz History: The Standards (1930s)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an Listed in The Real Vocal Book.
  5. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 57.
  6. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 29.
  7. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 55.
  8. ^ Kirchner 2005, p. 185
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "Grammy Hall of Fame". Grammy.com. Archived from the original on 7 July 2015. Retrieved 2 April 2011.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah Listed in The Real Jazz Book.
  11. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "But Not for Me". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  12. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 185.
  13. ^ a b c d Burlingame, Sandra. "I'm Confessin' That I Love You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  14. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Embraceable You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  15. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 116.
  16. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 98.
  17. ^ Tyle, Chris. "Exactly Like You". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 5 May 2009.
  18. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 145.
  19. ^ a b Wilson, Jeremy. "Georgia on My Mind". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  20. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "I Got Rhythm". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  21. ^ Greenberg 1998, pp. 152–155
  22. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 242.
  23. ^ a b "Lazy River". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  24. ^ a b Studwell & Baldin 2000, p. 127
  25. ^ Matthew Greenwald. "Lazy River song review". AllMusic. Retrieved 3 May 2009.
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  27. ^ Wilder & Maher 1972, p. 229
  28. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 260.
  29. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 202.
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  33. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 214.
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  37. ^ Bradbury 2005, p. 31
  38. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 298
  39. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 312
  40. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 277.
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  42. ^ Forte 1995, p. 251
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  44. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Listed in The New Real Book, Volume I.
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  46. ^ a b c Wilson, Jeremy. "I Surrender Dear". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  47. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 193.
  48. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Just Friends". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  49. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 318.
  50. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Out of Nowhere". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  51. ^ a b "When It's Sleepy Time Down South". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  52. ^ Clayton 1995, p. 61
  53. ^ Bogdanov, Woodstra & Erlewine 2002, p. 42
  54. ^ Hersch 2008, p. 199
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  56. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Alone Together". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  57. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 32
  58. ^ a b c Burlingame, Sandra. "April in Paris". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 13 December 2010.
  59. ^ The Real Book, Volume III, p. 150.
  60. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "How Deep Is the Ocean? (How High Is the Sky?)". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
  61. ^ The Real Book, Volume II, p. 173.
  62. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 132.
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  65. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 161.
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  74. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 111.
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  82. ^ The New Real Book, Volume II, p. 337.
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  92. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 346
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  99. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 359.
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  104. ^ The New Real Book, Volume III, p. 171.
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  177. ^ The Big Broadcast of 1938 - "Thanks For the Memory" sung in the film by Bob Hope and Shirley Ross with the Shep Fields Orchestra in Hollywood Musicals Year by Year by Stanley Green, Milwaukee WI, 1990 & 1999 ISBN 0-634-00765-3 on books.google.com
  178. ^ Shep Fields Leader of Big Band Known For Rippling Rhythm Shep Fields Obituary listing his hit recordings  including "Thanks For the Memory" in The New York Times on nytimes.com
  179. ^ Shep Fields Dies - Noted Bandleader - Obituary in Associated Press in the Telegraph Feb.24,1981 on news.google.com
  180. ^ Thanks For the Memory - Bob Hope - signature song of Bob Hope on genius.com
  181. ^ Thanks For the Memory listed in The Real Book - 6th edition Hal Leonard, Milwaukee, WI ISBN 978-1-4584-2617-8 on books.google.com
  182. ^ Thanks For the Memory ranked 762 in the 1000 most frequently recorded jazz compositions on jazzstandards.com
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  184. ^ The Real Book, Volume I, p. 22
  185. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "All the Things You Are". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
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  187. ^ Wilson, Jeremy. "Darn That Dream". JazzStandards.com. Retrieved 20 February 2009.
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Bibliography

Reference works

Fake books

A fake book is a collection of musical lead sheets intended to help a performer quickly learn new songs.

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