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Le Divan du Monde

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Le Divan du Monde
Divan Japonais (1873-?), Théâtre de la Comédie Mondaine (1901-?)
Rue des Martyrs.JPG
Front of Le Divan du Monde, rue des Martyrs
Address 75, rue des Martyrs, 18th arrondissement
Paris
Capacity approximately 500
Opened 1873
Website
www.divandumonde.com

Le Divan du Monde ('The Divan of the World') is a converted theatre, now functioning as a concert space, located at 75 rue des Martyrs, in the 18th arrondissement, in the Pigalle neighborhood of Paris.

History

At the beginning of the 19th century, there was a ballroom called the Saint-Flour Musette. In 1861 it was turned into the Brasserie des Martyrs, which was patronized by Charles Baudelaire, Edgar Degas, and Jules Vallès.[1] This was replaced in 1873 by a café-concert christened the "Divan Japonais" ('Japanese Divan') by its owner Théophile Lefort, who decorated it in Japanese-style. His successor, Jules Sarrazin, had a second room built in the basement called "Temple de la Bonne Humeur" ('Temple of Good Mood').

Poster from Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec for the Divan Japonais (1892), showing dancer Jane Avril and critic Édouard Dujardin.
Poster from Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec for the Divan Japonais (1892), showing dancer Jane Avril and critic Édouard Dujardin.

The cabaret singer Yvette Guilbert became famous there when she appeared in 1891 and Dranem was also a featured artist. The pantomime Le Coucher de la Mariée (The Bride Going to Bed) was performed there in 1894. This included for the first time a "naked" woman (i.e. wearing a somewhat transparent blouse), which scandalized the audience.[2] Toulouse-Lautrec and Adolphe Léon Willette, then Pablo Picasso, were frequent visitors.

In 1901, the Divan became the Théâtre de la Comédie Mondaine. It was later replaced by an erotic theatre.[3]

In 1994, it was reopened as Le Divan du Monde ('The World Divan'), featuring world music concerts. In the context if those concerts, Le Divan du Monde hosts dancers for all genre. The Hip Hop dancers Bintou Dembélé danced there in the late 1990s, for instance.[4]

In November 2009, it was completely redecorated, and now hosts events from concerts to club nights.

References

Notes
  1. ^ Dictionnaire historique de rues de Paris
  2. ^ Jacques Charles, Le caf'-conc
  3. ^ André Sallée et Philippe Chauveau, Music-Hall et café-concert, Paris, Bordas, 1985.
  4. ^ Un témoignage de Bintou Dembélé (2013). "S/T/R/A/T/E/S. Trente ans de Hip-Hop dans le corps". Africultures. (n° 99 - 100): 250–261.

External links

This page was last edited on 1 August 2018, at 22:55
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