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Latino World Order

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Latino World Order
Latino World Order.jpg
Stable
MembersSee below
Billed fromMexico
DebutOctober 5, 1998
DisbandedJanuary 11, 1999

The Latino World Order (abbreviated lWo or LWO) was a professional wrestling stable that existed in World Championship Wrestling (WCW) in 1998 and 1999 led by Eddie Guerrero. The name of the stable was invented by Jason Hervey and was inspired by and intended as a mockery of the famous New World Order (nWo).

History

Concept

The LWO was formed in late 1998 after Eddie Guerrero's spat with WCW head Eric Bischoff, a real-life conflict that was turned into a storyline.[1] The group was the idea of Jason Hervey, a friend of Bischoff.[2] The stable was originally supposed to revolve around Konnan, but it was given to Guerrero after Konnan joined the nWo Wolfpac.[2]

Beginnings

On August 17, Guerrero gave a  shoot, where he claimed to want out of his contract.[1] After being taken off television for several weeks, Guerrero returned on the October 5 edition of WCW Monday Nitro, forming the LWO with several other Mexican wrestlers.[2][3] The group consisted of the majority of the Mexican roster, as well as Guerrero's friend Art Flores, who played the role of a bodyguard named Spyder.[4]

The group consisted of almost every major Mexican wrestler on the WCW roster including Psychosis, La Parka, Hector Garza, and Juventud Guerrera. Their main feud lied with Rey Mysterio, Jr., after he refused to join the group.[4] They also feuded with Billy Kidman, Mysterio's on-and-off American tag team partner. Mysterio was forced to become a member after losing a match to Eddie Guerrero. Chavo Guerrero, Jr. attempted to join several times, but Eddie did not allow him to become a member since Chavo was (kayfabe) mentally unstable at the time and carried around a wooden horse named Pepé.

Demise and aftermath

A car accident suffered by Guerrero on January 1, 1999 would help bring a premature end to the LWO.[5] Three days later, the two factions of the New World Order reunited, and before long, various members of the LWO were found lying unconscious backstage. The nWo approached the LWO and demanded they immediately disband or face further consequences. The next week Ric Flair also asked the LWO to disband and fight for WCW promising he would treat them better than Bischoff did and also promising them money, women and limousines. Every member other than Mysterio agreed, removing their LWO shirts and exiting the ring. Mysterio, who was not originally a willing member of the group, proved himself the most loyal when he refused to remove his LWO colors. The nWo beat him down and forcibly tore off his LWO shirt, leading to a feud between Mysterio and The Outsiders.

The reunited nWo also betrayed their only Latino member, Konnan, who had objected to the brutality used against Mysterio, leading them to form a team against The Outsiders. As Eddie Guerrero healed and made his in-ring return, key LWO members such as himself, Mysterio, and Juventud Guerrera formed a popular new group with Konnan known as The Filthy Animals.

Members

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b Guerrero, Eddie. Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The Eddie Guerrero Story, p. 169–171.
  2. ^ a b c Guerrero, Eddie. Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The Eddie Guerrero Story, p. 172–173.
  3. ^ Sammond, Nicholas (2005). Steel Chair to the Head. Duke University Press. pp. 248–249. ISBN 978-0-8223-3438-5.
  4. ^ a b Guerrero, Eddie. Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The Eddie Guerrero Story, p. 174–175.
  5. ^ Guerrero, Eddie. Cheating Death, Stealing Life: The Eddie Guerrero Story, p. 181.

References

This page was last edited on 25 March 2020, at 18:44
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