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Lake County, Colorado

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Lake County
Courthouse in Leadville, Colorado.
Courthouse in Leadville, Colorado.
Official seal of Lake County
Map of Colorado highlighting Lake County
Location within the U.S. state of Colorado
Map of the United States highlighting Colorado
Colorado's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 39°11′N 106°22′W / 39.19°N 106.36°W / 39.19; -106.36
Country United States
State Colorado
FoundedNovember 1, 1861
Named forTwin Lakes in the area
SeatLeadville
Largest cityLeadville
Area
 • Total384 sq mi (990 km2)
 • Land377 sq mi (980 km2)
 • Water7.0 sq mi (18 km2)  1.8%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2020)
7,436
 • Density20/sq mi (8/km2)
Time zoneUTC−7 (Mountain)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−6 (MDT)
Congressional district3rd
Websitewww.lakecountyco.com
Twin Lakes – Department of the Interior. General Land Office. U.S. Geological and Geographic Survey of the Territories. (1874 – 06/30/1879)

Lake County is one of 64 counties in the U.S. state of Colorado. As of the 2020 census, the population was 7,436.[1] The county seat and the only municipality in the county is Leadville.[2] The highest natural point in Colorado and the entire Rocky Mountains is the summit of Mount Elbert in Lake County at 14,440 feet (4401.2 meters) elevation.

History

Lake County was one of the original 17 counties created by the Colorado legislature on November 1, 1861. As originally defined, Lake County included a large portion of western Colorado to the south and west of its present boundaries. The county was named for Twin Lakes.

Placer gold was found at Colorado Gulch in 1863 as part of the Colorado Gold Rush.[3]: 30 

Lake County slowly lost territory over the succeeding decades, losing land in its southeast to Saguache County in 1866 and Hinsdale County in 1874; in its southwest to La Plata County in 1874 and San Juan County in 1876, and in its west to Ouray and Gunnison counties in 1877.

With its many reductions in size, Lake County's designated county seat also changed multiple times within just a few years, residing successively in Oro City (from 1861), Lourette (from 1863), Dayton (from 1866), and Granite (from 1868).

By 1878, Lake County had been reduced to an area including only present-day Lake and Chaffee counties. On February 8, 1879, the Colorado legislature renamed Lake County as Carbonate County, although this designation name only lasted for two days, until Chaffee County was split off from Carbonate's southern section on February 10 and the remaining northern portion was redesignated Lake County with its current county seat of Leadville.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 384 square miles (990 km2), of which 377 square miles (980 km2) is land and 7.0 square miles (18 km2) (1.8%) is water.[4] It is the fourth-smallest county in Colorado by area.

Adjacent counties

Major Highways

In popular culture

The 2013 horror video game Outlast is set in a fictional asylum in Lake County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870522
188023,5694,415.1%
189014,603−38.0%
190018,05423.6%
191010,600−41.3%
19206,630−37.5%
19304,899−26.1%
19406,83339.5%
19508,60025.9%
19607,101−17.4%
19708,31817.1%
19807,491−9.9%
19906,007−19.8%
20007,10218.2%
20107,3102.9%
20207,4361.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2020[1]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 7,812 people, 2,977 households, and 1,914 families living in the county. The population density was 21 people per square mile (8/km2). There were 3,913 housing units at an average density of 10 per square mile (4/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 77.60% White, 0.18% Black or African American, 1.25% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 17.99% from other races, and 2.62% from two or more races. 36.14% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 2,977 households, out of which 33.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.70% were married couples living together, 8.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.70% were non-families. 26.30% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.60% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 26.90% under the age of 18, 12.80% from 18 to 24, 33.10% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 6.60% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females there were 115.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 116.70 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $37,691, and the median income for a family was $41,652. Males had a median income of $30,977 versus $24,415 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,524. About 9.50% of families and 12.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.60% of those under age 18 and 6.30% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

United States presidential election results for Lake County, Colorado[10]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 1,497 37.79% 2,303 58.14% 161 4.06%
2016 1,270 39.70% 1,616 50.52% 313 9.78%
2012 1,098 36.12% 1,839 60.49% 103 3.39%
2008 1,078 35.91% 1,859 61.93% 65 2.17%
2004 1,261 42.76% 1,623 55.04% 65 2.20%
2000 1,056 40.18% 1,296 49.32% 276 10.50%
1996 728 29.71% 1,338 54.61% 384 15.67%
1992 605 20.70% 1,426 48.79% 892 30.52%
1988 969 38.10% 1,516 59.61% 58 2.28%
1984 1,364 49.65% 1,324 48.20% 59 2.15%
1980 1,375 45.45% 1,213 40.10% 437 14.45%
1976 1,575 48.03% 1,549 47.24% 155 4.73%
1972 1,556 53.67% 1,263 43.57% 80 2.76%
1968 1,025 35.50% 1,550 53.69% 312 10.81%
1964 681 22.32% 2,362 77.42% 8 0.26%
1960 954 34.03% 1,842 65.72% 7 0.25%
1956 1,433 51.31% 1,355 48.51% 5 0.18%
1952 1,303 44.98% 1,585 54.71% 9 0.31%
1948 838 33.49% 1,581 63.19% 83 3.32%
1944 1,236 42.08% 1,687 57.44% 14 0.48%
1940 1,403 40.30% 2,063 59.26% 15 0.43%
1936 650 23.03% 2,146 76.02% 27 0.96%
1932 801 34.89% 1,436 62.54% 59 2.57%
1928 990 40.10% 1,449 58.69% 30 1.22%
1924 1,005 43.00% 613 26.23% 719 30.77%
1920 1,287 53.16% 992 40.97% 142 5.87%
1916 993 25.46% 2,672 68.51% 235 6.03%
1912 966 22.92% 1,933 45.87% 1,315 31.21%


Lake County has leaned towards the Democratic Party for most of its history, voting for that party's presidential nominee in every election since 1988.

Communities

City

Census-designated places

Unincorporated community

Ghost Town

Historic sites

1890s(?) building in Stumptown, in the Leadville mining district.
1890s(?) building in Stumptown, in the Leadville mining district.

Recreation

State protected area

National protected areas

Trails

Scenic byway

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved September 5, 2021.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Voynick, S.M., 1992, Colorado Gold, Missoula: Mountain Press Publishing Company, ISBN 0878424555
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 8, 2014.
  9. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  10. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 26, 2017.

External links

This page was last edited on 28 March 2022, at 16:58
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