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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Koya
Native toIndia
RegionChinturu, Andhra Pradesh
Native speakers
47,701 (2011)[1]
Dravidian
  • South-Central
    • Gondi–Kui
      • Kuvi–Kui
        • Koya
Language codes
ISO 639-3kff
Glottologkoya1251[2]

Koya is a South-Central Dravidian language of the GondiKui group spoken by the Koya people. It is sometimes described as a dialect of Gondi (spoken in Adilabad district in Telangana and in Gondwana region of Central India), but it is possibly mutually unintelligible with Gondi dialects.[3]

Koya is the language spoken by the tribal community in Integrated Tribal Development Agency (ITDA), Bhadrachalam in Khammam district; ITDA, Rampachodavaram, East Godavari district; ITDA, Kotaramachandrapuram, West Godavari district in Andhra Pradesh. There are also Koyas in Chhattisgarh State.

Koya is variously written in the Oriya, Telugu, Devanagari or Latin script. Sathupati Prasanna Sree has also developed a unique script for use with the Koya language. With 270,994 registered native speakers, it figures at rank 37 in the 1991 Indian census.[citation needed] There are textbooks developed in Koya language under Mother Tongue based Multilingual Education Programme by Government of Andhra Pradesh and implemented in 50 primary schools in Koya habitations.

References

  1. ^ "Statement 1: Abstract of speakers' strength of languages and mother tongues - 2011". www.censusindia.gov.in. Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 2018-07-07.
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Koya". Glottolog 3.0. Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.
  3. ^ Bhadriraju Krishnamurti (2003). The Dravidian languages. Oxford University Press. p. 25.
This page was last edited on 20 July 2019, at 19:45
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