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Keith Sinclair (bishop)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Keith Sinclair
Bishop of Birkenhead
Keith Sinclair (3513908746).jpg
Sinclair conducting a dedication ceremony in 2008
ChurchChurch of England
DioceseDiocese of Chester
In office2007–2021
PredecessorDavid Urquhart
Orders
Ordination1 July 1984 (deacon); 30 June 1985 (priest)
by Hugh Montefiore
Consecration8 March 2007
by John Sentamu
Personal details
Born (1952-12-03) 3 December 1952 (age 68)
NationalityBritish
DenominationAnglican
Spouse
(m. 1989)
Children3
Alma materChrist Church, Oxford
Cranmer Hall, Durham

Gordon Keith Sinclair (born 3 December 1952) is a British Anglican retired bishop. From 2007 until 2021, he served as the Bishop of Birkenhead, one of two suffragan bishops in the Church of England Diocese of Chester.

Early life and education

Sinclair was born on 3 December 1952 to Donald and Joyce Sinclair.[1] He studied at Christ Church, Oxford, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree; as per tradition, his BA was later promoted to an Oxford Master of Arts (MA Oxon) degree.[1][2] He then worked as a solicitor.[3]

Sinclair entered Cranmer Hall, Durham, an Evangelical Anglican theological college, to train for the ministry.[2] During this time he studied theology and graduated with BA degree from Durham University in 1984.[1]

Ordained ministry

Sinclair was ordained in the Church of England: made a deacon at Petertide 1984 (1 July)[4] and ordained a priest the Petertide following (30 June 1985) – both times by Hugh Montefiore, Bishop of Birmingham, at Birmingham Cathedral.[5] From 1984 to 1988, he served his curacy at Christ Church, Summerfield in the Diocese of Birmingham.[1][2] He was additionally a part-time chaplain at the Birmingham Children's Hospital.[3] Then, from 1988 to 2001, he was vicar of the Church of SS Peter & Paul, Aston.[1] He was also the area dean of Aston and an honorary canon of Birmingham Cathedral between 2000 and 2001.[2] He moved to the Diocese of Coventry, and served as vicar of Holy Trinity Church, Coventry from 2001 to 2007.[2]

Episcopal ministry

Sinclair was consecrated a bishop on 8 March 2007 by John Sentamu, Archbishop of York, at York Minster.[6] From then until retirement, he served as the Bishop of Birkenhead, one of two suffragan bishops in the Diocese of Chester.[3] He retired as bishop effective 8 March 2021, the 14th anniversary of his consecration.[7]

Beliefs

Sinclair is on the council of reference of the True Freedom Trust. Its vision is to uphold traditional biblical teaching on sexual relationships and gender and to do so with "understanding and compassion, so that Christians who struggle with same-sex attractions or gender identity gain increasing acceptance, wholeness and maturity in faith within their local church."

Sinclair was one of the bishops selected to be a member of the Church of England working group on human sexuality which in 2013 produced the Pilling Report.[8] The report acknowledges the complexity of the issue stating: "This report cannot attempt a definitive account of the debate about the meaning of Scripture, even if such an enterprise were conceivable."

Two essays are appended to the Report. One, by Sinclair, epitomizes a conservative understanding of the biblical texts. The other by the Revd David Runcorn argues a scriptural case for a more inclusive ethic.

The Report, by way of explanation for the essays, states: "We include these two contributions, not because they sum up the whole range of scriptural scholarship on this subject – they emphatically do not – but because they epitomize the way in which study of the same sources can lead to very different conclusions."

Personal life

Sinclair has been married[9][10] since 1989[1] and they have three children.[9] He is a keen walker[11] and his brother is the actor Malcolm Sinclair.[12]

Styles

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Sinclair, Gordon Keith". Who's Who. ukwhoswho.com. 2017 (November 2016 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 29 July 2017. (subscription or UK public library membership required)
  2. ^ a b c d e "Gordon Keith Sinclair". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  3. ^ a b c "Who's Who: Bishop of Birkenhead — Rt Revd Keith Sinclair". Diocese of Chester. Chester Diocesan Board of Finance. Archived from the original on 19 January 2012. Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  4. ^ "Petertide ordinations". Church Times (#6334). 6 July 1984. p. 4. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 29 July 2017 – via UK Press Online archives.
  5. ^ "Petertide ordinations". Church Times (#6386). 5 July 1985. p. 16. ISSN 0009-658X. Retrieved 29 July 2017 – via UK Press Online archives.
  6. ^ "York Minster consecration service for new Bishop of Birkenhead". Liverpool Daily Post. 8 March 2007. Retrieved 13 March 2017.
  7. ^ [1]
  8. ^ Report of the House of Bishops Working Group on Human Sexuality (PDF). Church House Publishing. 2013.
  9. ^ a b Official notification of appointment
  10. ^ London Gazette Notice of Appointment
  11. ^ Debrett's People of Today London, 2008 Debrett's, ISBN 978-1-870520-95-9
  12. ^ "Actor's long association with playwright". Sheffield Telegraph. 3 February 2011. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
Church of England titles
Preceded by
David Urquhart
Bishop of Birkenhead
2007–2021
TBA
This page was last edited on 16 March 2021, at 16:46
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