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Kagayaki Taishi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kagayaki Taishi
輝 大士
Kagayaki 2015 March.JPG
Personal information
BornTatsu Ryōya
(1994-06-01) 1 June 1994 (age 25)
Kanazawa, Ishikawa
Height1.92 m (6 ft 3 12 in)
Weight163 kg (359 lb; 25 st 9 lb)
Career
StableTakadagawa stable
Current ranksee below
DebutMay, 2010
Highest rankMaegashira 4 (July, 2017)
* Up to date as of Sept 22, 2019.

Kagayaki Taishi (輝 大士) (born 1 June 1994 as Tatsu Ryōya) is a Japanese sumo wrestler. He made his professional debut in May 2010. He reached the top division for the first time in 2016. His highest rank is maegashira 4. He wrestles for Takadagawa stable.

Early life and sumo background

Tatsu Ryōya was born in Kanazawa, Ishikawa and is the youngest of three children. His father was a truck driver. He was a normal-sized baby but grew quickly so that when attending kindergarten he had difficulty fitting into the uniform. He first began practicing sumo whilst in the first grade of elementary school. By the age of thirteen, when he ended his first year at junior high school he stood 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in), and weighed 108 kg (238 lb). After competing successfully in junior high school sumo he gave up formal education at the age of fifteen and entered the Takadagawa stable to pursue a professional career.[1][2]

Career

Early career

In the early part of his sumo career the wrestler subsequently known as Kagayaki competed as "Tatsu", his family name. On entering the professional sport Tatsu revealed that his idol was Hakuhō and that his aim was to become a yokozuna "in six or seven years".[3]

He was still a month away from his sixteenth birthday when he made his professional debut in May 2010 but recorded six wins in the jonokuchi division to earn an immediate promotion. Two months later another 6-1 result saw him being promoted from jonidan to sandanme, the fourth-highest division. After five more tournaments he was promoted to makushita (third division) after a 5–2 result at the Nagoya tournament in July 2011.

On his third tournament in the division, in January 2012, the seventeen-year-old Tatsu tied for the lead with six wins at the end of regular competition but was defeated in the first round of an eight-man play-off for the makushita championship.[4] Tatsu spent the next two years performing consistently in the mid to upper makushita ranks before a run of eight consecutive winning records (kachi-koshi) saw him being promoted to jūryō (second division) for the November 2014 tournament. It was at this point that Tatsu announced that he had adopted the shikona Kagayaki, after the express train service which runs between Tokyo and Kanazawa, his home town.[5]

Kagayaki made an immediate impact in jūryō, recording 11–4 and 10–5 records in his first two tournaments to reach the brink of another promotion but initially struggled when moved up to the division's higher ranks. A 10–5 record in September however, put him back in contention and an 8–7 in November 2015 (beating Satoyama on the final day) saw him promoted to makuuchi (top division) for the first time.

Makuuchi career

Kagayaki struggled in his top division debut: he won only two of his first thirteen matches, one of which was a walk-over when his scheduled opponent, Endō, withdrew with an injury. He won his last two bouts to salvage a 4–11 record but he was relegated back to jūryō. He recorded only seven wins in March but secured a second promotion with a 10–5 result in May. He barely avoided relegation with a 7–8 record in July but recorded his first kachi-koshi (winning record) in the top division with nine wins in September. Ranked at a new high of maegashira 9 he recorded six wins in November and was dropped to maegashira 11 for the January 2017 tournament when he posted an 8–7 record. He returned to maegashira 9 in March and retained his rank for the May tournament despite a 7–8 result. He continued to maintain his place in the top division for the rest of that year, reaching a new career-best rank of maegashira 4 in July.

Fighting style

Kagayaki is an oshi and tsuki specialist, which means he relies on pushing and thrusting techniques to defeat his opponents rather than belt-wrestling. His most common winning technique is oshidashi (push-out) which accounts for 46% of his wins.[6]

Career record

Kagayaki Taishi[7]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2010 x (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #11
6–1
 
East Jonidan #50
6–1
 
East Sandanme #84
6–1
 
East Sandanme #25
4–3
 
2011 West Sandanme #11
2–5
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–15
East Sandanme #37
4–3
 
East Sandanme #12
5–2
 
East Makushita #53
4–3
 
East Makushita #46
4–3
 
2012 East Makushita #40
6–1–P
 
East Makushita #16
2–5
 
West Makushita #31
5–2
 
West Makushita #19
5–2
 
West Makushita #11
2–5
 
West Makushita #25
5–2
 
2013 East Makushita #16
3–4
 
West Makushita #21
3–4
 
East Makushita #33
3–4
 
East Makushita #44
4–3
 
East Makushita #38
4–3
 
West Makushita #29
5–2
 
2014 East Makushita #19
4–3
 
East Makushita #13
4–3
 
West Makushita #9
4–3
 
East Makushita #7
5–2
 
West Makushita #3
4–3
 
West Jūryō #14
10–5
 
2015 West Jūryō #8
11–4
 
East Jūryō #2
6–9
 
West Jūryō #4
8–7
 
West Jūryō #2
6–9
 
East Jūryō #5
10–5
 
East Jūryō #2
8–7
 
2016 East Maegashira #16
4–11
 
West Jūryō #4
7–8
 
East Jūryō #5
10–5
 
East Maegashira #14
7–8
 
West Maegashira #14
9–6
 
West Maegashira #9
6–9
 
2017 East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #9
7–8
 
West Maegashira #9
9–6
 
West Maegashira #4
5–10
 
West Maegashira #6
4–11
 
West Maegashira #12
7–8
 
2018 West Maegashira #12
9–6
 
East Maegashira #8
7–8
 
West Maegashira #8
9–6
 
West Maegashira #4
6–9
 
East Maegashira #6
7–8
 
West Maegashira #6
5–10
 
2019 East Maegashira #12
6–9
 
West Maegashira #13
9–6
 
East Maegashira #10
5–10
 
West Maegashira #12
7–8
 
East Maegashira #13
6–9
 
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also

References

  1. ^ 15歳193cm145kg新弟子検査に驚異の中3 nikkansports.com 2010年3月7日9時44分 紙面から
  2. ^ 輪島遠縁「達」プロ初戦は秒殺/春場所 nikkansports.com 2010年3月16日8時51分 紙面から
  3. ^ "Sumo – Schoolboy giant set for pro debut". Reuters. 9 March 2010.
  4. ^ http://sumodb.sumogames.de/Results.aspx?b=201201&d=16
  5. ^ "Shodai, Kagayaki enter New Year Basho with high expectations". Japan News.
  6. ^ "Kagayaki Taishi- Rikihi profile". sumo.or.jp.
  7. ^ "Kagayaki Taishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 1 February 2017.

External links

This page was last edited on 22 September 2019, at 06:50
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