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Judge Memorial Catholic High School

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Judge Memorial Catholic High School
Red Cross over an Intertwined, Gold "J" and "M"
Seal of Judge Memorial Catholic High School. A red and white shield containing a torch reading "Basileus" and a white Chi Rho over a gold Reuleaux triangle reading "Christ The King - Established 1921" over a red Reuleaux triangle reading Judge Memorial Catholic High School.
Address
650 South 1100 East

,
84102

United States
Coordinates40°45′18″N 111°51′38″W / 40.75500°N 111.86056°W / 40.75500; -111.86056
Information
TypePrivate, coeducational
Religious affiliation(s)Roman Catholic
Established1921
Grades912
Color(s)Red and gold   
MascotBulldogs
AccreditationWCEA Western Catholic Education Association, Northwest Association of Accredited Schools [1]
Websitewww.judgememorial.com

Judge Memorial Catholic High School is a private Catholic high school located in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. It is one of three high schools in the Roman Catholic Diocese of Salt Lake City serving students in grades nine through 12. Founded in 1921, the school draws students from across the Salt Lake Valley and beyond. Judge Memorial shares its city location with Our Lady of Lourdes parish and school.

History

The school property was originally the John Judge Memorial Miner's Home, a hospital established by Mary Judge, wife of John Judge, a partner of US Senator Thomas Kearns in Park City's famous Silver King Mining Co. Kearns married Judge's niece, Jennie Judge. Judge Mercy Home, more commonly called Judge Miner's Home, was designed by architect David C. Dart. The hospital was established for the population of Catholic coal miners working in Park City who suffered from black lung. As the need for a hospital dedicated to this cause subsided in direct relation to the decline of coal mining east of Salt Lake, Mary Judge (who along with her deceased husband, John, was the benefactor of the hospital) expressed her wishes to the bishop of the Diocese of Salt Lake to reopen the medical facility as a school. Mary Judge died before the diocese opened the new school's doors. The cornerstone was laid by Bishop Lawrence Scanlan in the fall of 1902 but the hospital was not opened until the fall of 1910. The hospital was originally intended to provide medical treatment for aged and infirm miners. Many miners working in Park City suffered from silicosis, also known as "miners' consumption", the disease that killed Mary's husband John at the age of 48.[2] With Holy Cross Hospital a few blocks away, the need for a miners' hospital was not great; it was remodeled and opened as a school in the fall of 1920, under the name "Cathedral School."

Until 1929 the school was known as Cathedral High School and Catholic Grammar School. Bishop John Joseph Mitty changed the name to Judge Memorial School in 1929.[3] In the fall of 1960, Judge moved into a new school building, and the old building was used as an elementary school until it was torn down in 1966.[3][4] Judge Memorial was co-educational until 1964. That fall, Bishop Joseph Lennox Federal brought in the Oblates of St. Francis de Sales to run it as an all-boys school. At this time, girls attended St. Mary of the Wasatch High School.[5] In 1970, St. Mary closed and girls once again joined the boys at Judge.[6] That same year, the school added the word "Catholic" to its name.

Student body

  • Among the 720 enrolled students, 49% are female and 51% are male.
  • 59% of students are Catholic. The remaining 41% represent 14 different religions.
  • 36% of students self-reported as being an ethnic minority (Asian, Black, Hispanic, Native American, and Pacific Islander).
  • 60% of students live in Salt Lake City proper (claiming Salt Lake City zip codes). Other large population centers include Bountiful/North Salt Lake, Murray, Park City, Sandy, Taylorsville, West Jordan, and West Valley City.

Notable alumni

Business & Communications

Government & Community Leadership

Athletics

Music, Film, & Fine Arts

See also

References

  1. ^ NAAS. "Northwest Association of Accredited Schools". Archived from the original on January 25, 2009. Retrieved 2009-07-29.
  2. ^ "JOHN AND MARY HARNEY JUDGE," Utah History Encyclopedia
  3. ^ a b "Goodbye to Old Judge High," Deseret News, August 5, 1966
  4. ^ Deseret News, June 4, 1960
  5. ^ Deseret News, May 30, 1964
  6. ^ Buchanan, Frederick S. (1994), "Education in Utah", in Powell, Allan Kent (ed.), Utah History Encyclopedia, Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, ISBN 0874804256, OCLC 30473917
  7. ^ "News, Notes, Updates 2017-2018 – Alumni". Judge Memorial Catholic High School. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  8. ^ "Alana Brophy". ABC4. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  9. ^ "Elliot Fall". Real Salt Lake. Retrieved 2020-01-30.
  10. ^ "Meet new City Councilwoman-Elect Rosalba Dominguez". Murray Journal. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  11. ^ Judd, Brandon (2019-04-27). "Former Judge Memorial High star Kaden Elliss taken by New Orleans Saints in seventh round of 2019 NFL draft". Deseret News. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  12. ^ "Losing at Utah State Amateur prompts golfer to turn pro". Deseret News. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  13. ^ "Judge graduate now a Major League Soccer player". iCatholic. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  14. ^ "NICKSFIX.COM". www.nicksfix.com. Retrieved 2020-04-11.
  15. ^ Sloan, Chris (August 16, 2008). "Stevie Nicks went to my school?". Connected Composition. Retrieved 2020-04-11.
  16. ^ Buttars, Lori (September 12, 1997). "True `Rumours': Singer Stevie Nicks reunites with Fleetwood Mac and her Salt Lake roots; Fleetwood Mac Brings Nicks Back to S.L.". The Salt Lake Tribune.
  17. ^ "Riley Mackin". Grammy Awards. Retrieved 2021-02-15.
  18. ^ Chris Miller. "Utah guitarist lands spot on Colbert's 'Late Show'". KUTV. Retrieved 2017-08-22. It's just like, 'What can this 14 year-old do?' and then about five, ten minutes into the lesson, I thought, this is the most talented person I've ever worked with.

External links

This page was last edited on 17 February 2021, at 07:29
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