To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Josh O'Connor
Josh O'Connor at the 6th Odessa International Film Festival (2).jpg
O'Connor at OIFF
Born (1990-05-20) 20 May 1990 (age 31)
NationalityBritish
EducationSt Edward's School, Cheltenham
Bristol Old Vic Theatre School
OccupationActor
Years active2012–present
RelativesJohn Bunting (grandfather)
Madeleine Bunting (aunt)

Josh O'Connor (born 20 May 1990) is a British actor. He is known for his portrayal of young Prince Charles in the Netflix drama The Crown (2019–2020), for which he won a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Television Series Drama and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series in 2021 and was nominated for the 2020 British Academy Television Award for Best Supporting Actor and the 2021 British Academy Television Award for Best Actor.

He is also known for his role as Johnny Saxby in Francis Lee's God's Own Country, for which he won a British Independent Film Award for Best Actor, and as Lawrence Durrell in the ITV series The Durrells. He also appeared as Marius Pontmercy in BBC One's miniseries of Victor Hugo's novel Les Misérables.

Early life and education

O'Connor was born in 1990 in Southampton, England, to John, a teacher, and Emily, a midwife.[1] O'Connor grew up in Newbury until he was five, when his family moved to Cheltenham, Gloucestershire where he was brought up.[2] The middle son in a family of three boys, his older brother is an artist and his younger brother Seb is an ecological economist and a Phd researcher.[1]

He comes from an artistic family. His grandfather was British sculptor John Bunting, his grandmother is a ceramicist, and his maternal aunt is British writer and commentator Madeleine Bunting.[3][4] His ancestry is Irish, English, Scottish and, through his matrilineal great-grandmother, Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jewish.[5]

He wanted to be a professional artist when he was younger, but he didn't think he was good enough, so he switched to rugby and then discovered acting. His first major role was at age seven as the scarecrow in a school production of The Wizard of Oz, followed by a minor role in Bugsy Malone.[6][2] O'Connor went to a private co-ed school, St Edward's School, Cheltenham, during the week and spent a lot of time on weekends at the Axiom, a local arts centre. “It was an old red brick building, little library and cafe on the ground floor, gig venue upstairs, art classes on the top floor. All the local kids went there, from all different backgrounds. We did painting, ceramics.” He grew up in a Labour-supporting household, but traces his political awakening to the arts centre's closure when he was 11, feeling the deep sense of loss in the community. He is proud to have grown up outside of London, in a town with a strong tradition of regional theatre.[1]

O’Connor has cited his school's drama program as that which helped him live with his dyslexia for many years especially when preparing for his General Certificate of Secondary Education exams (GCSEs), saying, "This drama teacher came in who had an unbelievable wealth of knowledge about theatre. All of a sudden we were going on school trips, seeing these amazing plays by the likes of Samuel Beckett. Before, I would go to an English class and read Shakespeare and find it infuriating. Now, suddenly dyslexic Josh could read Romeo and Juliet and, while not necessarily understanding every word, I could visualize the theatrical magic. I became obsessed.”[7] He then trained at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School, from which he graduated in 2011 then moved to London.[8][1] During his third year of theatre school, he signed with an agent.[2]

Career

Early work and breakthrough

In 2012, O'Connor first appeared on television as Charlie Stephenson in Lewis and on film as a zombie in The Eschatrilogy: Book of the Dead. In 2013, he appeared in Doctor Who as Piotr, in The Magnificent Eleven as Andy, in Law & Order: UK as Rob Fellows, in The Wiper Times as Dodd, and in London Irish as James.

On stage in 2013, he was cast as Ben Fowles in his first professional play, Farragut North by Beau Willimon at the Southwark Playhouse.[9][2] The Independent remarked, "O’Connor delivers a comic gem of a performance."[10] This led to a role as young returning soldier Hugh in Peter Gill's 2014 play Versailles at the Donmar Warehouse in Covent Garden, London. British Theatre raves, "Josh O’Connor is superb as Hugh, making a fully fleshed, utterly beguiling character out of very little."[11]

In the same year, he played Max in Hide and Seek, James in Peaky Blinders, and PC Bobby Grace in Ripper Street. After a year and a half of auditioning, he landed the role of a Bullingdon toff named Ed in The Riot Club (2014), Lone Scherfig's adaptation of Laura Wade's play about class and privilege, Posh, appearing alongside up-and-coming British actors Sam Claflin, Douglas Booth, Max Irons, Freddie Fox, Ben Schnetzer, and Olly Alexander.[2]

In 2015, he played Leo Beresford in Father Brown, a ballroom palace guard in Cinderella, and Charlie in the short film Holding on for a Good Time. He starred opposite his then-girlfriend Hannah Murray in Bridgend, Jeppe Rønde's dark, fictional portrayal of a real town in Wales with an alarmingly high teen suicide rate. It had a sold-out premiere in Copenhagen, where, accompanied by Lone Scherfig, Lars Von Trier told him, “It touched my heart. It touched my soul, but it’s totally immoral.”[3] O'Connor played Rich in the biographical drama film The Program about the cyclist Lance Armstrong, directed by Stephen Frears.

He also played in the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Thomas Dekker's The Shoemaker's Holiday as Rowland Lacy and Tom Morton-Smith's Oppenheimer as Luis Alvarez at the Swan Theatre in Stratford-Upon-Avon.[2][12][13] The following year, he took over the role of Donaghy in Florence Foster Jenkins, starring Meryl Streep and Hugh Grant, and starred as Donald in the short film Best Man. From 2016 to 2019, he played the role of Lawrence "Larry" Durrell in the ITV comedy-drama The Durrells.

In 2017, he starred as the young sheep farmer Johnny Saxby in the British drama film God's Own Country directed by Francis Lee. In preparation for his role, he worked with a Yorkshire farmer, laboring in the fields in between takes to learn the proper techniques and get the right physicality, and eventually birthed over 150 lambs.[14][7] The film premiered at the Sundance Film Festival to critical acclaim.[15] For his performance, he received multiple recognition including the British Independent Film Award for Best Actor and the Empire Award for Best Male Newcomer, and was nominated for the BAFTA Rising Star Award.[16]

In 2018, O'Connor starred as Peter in the segment The Colour of His Hair in Boys on film 18: Heroes, and starred alongside Laia Costa in Harry Wootliff's critically acclaimed directorial debut Only You,[17] which premiered in competition at the London Film Festival. For his performance, he received his second British Independent Film Award for Best Actor.[18] In 2019, he portrayed Marius Pontmercy in the British television adaptation of Victor Hugo's Les Miserables. He also starred as Jamie in Hope Gap, which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival, earning the Best Actor award at the Barcelona-Sant Jordi International Film Festival. It had a limited release in theaters before dropping digitally in May 2020.[2]

Critical acclaim with The Crown

In the same year, O'Connor began portraying Charles, Prince of Wales in Season 3 of the award-winning Netflix programme The Crown (2019), starring alongside Olivia Colman, Tobias Menzies, and Helena Bonham-Carter. In 2020, he was nominated for a British Academy Television Award for Best Supporting Actor for his role while the cast won the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series.[19] He revealed that the role did not initially interest him and that he had to be persuaded to audition, saying that it did not excite him thinking he cannot add anything to it. Creator Peter Morgan asked him to read a scene in which Charles compares himself to a character in Saul Bellow's 1944 novel Dangling Man, in which the character waits to be drafted into war because the war will give his life meaning. “[Charles] says, ‘I’m essentially waiting for my mother to die in order for my life to take meaning,’” It was the "aimlessness and purposelessness of Charles’s life as heir to the throne" that ultimately sparked his interest.[1][7]

“He’s one of the most beautiful actors to work opposite. He’s out there with the greats, in my mind.”

 – Olivia Colman on Josh O'Connor[20]

He reprised the role for Season 4 of The Crown (2020), and admitted that his character is "horrible" in that season. Still, he understands the source of Charles' discontent saying it all boils down to the fact that he's spent his entire life not being heard. “The one time he’s supposed to be the center of attention, he marries a woman who’s single-handedly the most popular woman in the world, and it’s too much for him," he explained.[6] O'Connor won accolades in 2021 including the Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series, the Golden Globe Award, the Critics' Choice Award, and the Hollywood Critics Association TV Awards for Best Television Actor in a Drama Series and received a nomination for the British Academy Television Award for Best Actor for his performance. The cast also won its second Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series. On the culmination of his journey as Prince Charles he said,“To take a character from being, in my eyes, entirely sympathetic, who’s seemingly unappreciated [but] is trying hard to fill these incredibly difficult and huge boots, to go to someone who’s in this total rut of a marriage— It was the experience of a lifetime."[21]

O'Connor also played Mr. Elton in the period comedy-drama film Emma based on Jane Austen's 1815 novel of the same name. In 2021, he portrayed Romeo in the Royal National Theatre's television film adaptation of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet. He also played Paul Sheringham in Mothering Sunday, which explores class divides and postwar survivor’s guilt in 1924, starring alongside Olivia Colman and Colin Firth. In the same year, it was announced that he would be working with Francis Lee again on a horror film with themes of "class and queerness".[22] In October 2021, he was set to star in The History of Sound a World War I love story film to be directed by Oliver Hermanus.[23]

Artistry and public image

The Guardian described O'Connor as a different type of actor who is unguarded, a huncher, a ready smiler with dyslexia who finds reading difficult but still enjoys it, and has the boyish and engaging energy of a primary schoolteacher, which most parents only half-fancy.[1]

"By the end of the film I was so skinny. I was in character the whole way through. It was really lonely and hard. I don’t think I’d do it again. You isolate yourself from all your friends. By week four we had to stop filming because I was so sick...probably because I didn’t wash my hands."

 – Josh O'Connor on method acting in God's Own Country (2017)[3]

It was his ears based on a photograph that drew director Francis Lee to invite O’Connor to audition for God's Own Country. “He delivered this incredibly brilliant portrayal of an emotionally repressed and difficult man, and I thought he must just be playing himself,” which is slightly concerning for Lee. When they finally met, Lee was shocked “because in walks this incredibly funny, upbeat, polite, middle-class boy was a million miles away from the character that he was going to play,” he said. “He’s one of those rare actors that is a real shape-shifter.”[20] His success in the movie confirmed his place on casting agents' scouting radar as one of those subtle, humble chameleons who can disappear into parts and are dubbed "actor's actors."[1]

The Crown creator Peter Morgan has compared O'Connor to former Barcelona midfielder Andrés Iniesta, a footballer with massive but unobtrusive skill.[1] “I was drawn to his sensitivity and the fact that he was complex but likable,” Morgan said on casting O'Connor as Prince Charles.[20] Olivia Colman praised him for the tenderness he displayed on-screen as well as his ability to inhabit the role, “Fragility, sparkle, strength, doubt: It’s all there in a second. Every scene we had together became my favorite scene.”[21]

Charity work and advocacies

O'Connor created the Waterlogged initiative to raise funds for Mind, a mental health charity working across England and Wales. Inspired by his mother who swam 60 times in her 60th year and by Roger Deakin's Waterlog, he attempted 30 swims around the UK and Ireland in his 30th year.[24][25] In January 2020, he and Olivia Colman visited the Stars Appeal, which aims to enhance the patient experience at the Salisbury District Hospital.[26] In December 2020, he and Emma Corrin offered their company for tea as part of a series of prize draws in support for War Child UK's Torn From Home appeal.[27] In March 2021, he starred in Loewe's campaign shot in the Baja California Desert for the Eye/Loewe/Nature collection made with sustainable thinking and recycling ethos. It pledged 15 euros of every sale to Fundación Global Nature, a charity for the protection of wildlife species in danger of extinction.[28]

Personal life

Prior to his recent relocation in New York,[21] O'Connor lived in a Victorian house in Shoreditch. In his spare time, he enjoys reading and drawing. He also likes to go camping and swimming.[2]

He is a Southampton FC supporter.[29]

His partner Margot Hauer-King, sister of actor Jonah Hauer-King,[30][31] is a former partnerships director at communications company, WPP,[32] and currently works as an account director at a digital start-up.[33] Turning 30 during the lockdown period in 2020 brought him to a realisation, “I don’t actually like clubbing, or hanging out in groups, or pretending to be cool. Overnight I decided I don’t have to like it. If I’m 30, I can admit that I like one-to-one dynamics, staying in, and reading.”[1]

Political views

O'Connor is a supporter of the Labour Party, campaigned for Jeremy Corbyn in the 2019 general election, and has described himself as a "liberal left-winger". The fact that The Crown upholds and validates the monarchy does not sit well with his own political views. “I’m a republican, although not in any kind of fist-waving, campaigning way. I was always mostly uninterested in them."[1][34][35][36] In an interview with The New York Times he expressed, “I think the queen is an extraordinary woman. Time after time, lots of men have failed, and this one woman in power has been consistent and remained dutiful and generally apolitical. In that sense, I have huge respect for her — and for Charles [who] is another level of someone who’s literally been waiting his entire life for this moment that still hasn’t come.”[20]

Filmography

Films

Year Title Role Notes
2011 Michael Myers in Love None Composer - Short film
2012 The Eschatrilogy: Book of the Dead Zombie
2013 The Magnificent Eleven Andy
2014 Hide and Seek Max
The Riot Club Ed
2015 Bridgend Jamie
Cinderella Ballroom Palace Guard
Holding on for a Good Time Charlie Short film
The Program Rich
2016 Florence Foster Jenkins Donaghy
Best Man Donald Short film
2017 God's Own Country Johnny Saxby
The Colour of His Hair Peter Short film / Documentary film
2018 Only You Jake
2019 Hope Gap Jamie
2020 Emma Mr. Elton
2021 Mothering Sunday Paul Sheringham
TBA Aisha Conor Healy Post-production
The History Of Sound David Pre-production
Lee Pre-production

Television

Year Title Role Notes
2012 Lewis Charlie Stephenson Episode: "Generation of Vipers"
2013 Doctor Who Piotr Episode: "Cold War"
Law & Order: UK Rob Fellows Episode: "Dependent"
The Wipers Times Dodd Television film
London Irish James Episode: "1.2"
2014 Peaky Blinders James 3 episodes
Ripper Street PC Bobby Grace 8 episodes
2015 Father Brown Leo Beresford Episode: "The Curse of Amenhotep"
2016–2019 The Durrells Lawrence Durrell 26 episodes
2019 Les Misérables Marius Pontmercy 3 episodes
2019–20 The Crown Prince Charles 13 episodes
2021 Romeo and Juliet Romeo Television play

Theatre

Year Title Role Director Playwright Theatre
2013 Farragut North Ben Fowles Guy Unsworth Beau Willimon Southwark Playhouse
2014 Versailles Hugh Skidmore Peter Gill Peter Gill Donmar Warehouse
2015 The Shoemaker's Holiday Rowland Lacy Philip Breen Thomas Dekker Swan Theatre
Oppenheimer Luis Alvarez Angus Jackson Tom Morton-Smith Swan Theatre, Vaudeville Theatre
2021 Romeo and Juliet Romeo Simon Godwin William Shakespeare Filmed at the Royal National Theatre

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Work Result Ref
2017 LesGaiCineMad Best Actor God's Own Country Won [37]
Stockholm Film Festival Best Actor Won [38][39]
British Independent Film Awards Best Actor Won [40]
2018 London Film Critics Circle Awards British/Irish Actor of the Year Nominated [41]
Evening Standard British Film Awards Best Actor Nominated [42]
Breakthrough of the Year Himself Nominated [43]
Empire Awards Best Male Newcomer God's Own Country Won [44]
British Academy Film Awards Rising Star Award Himself Nominated [45]
Faroe Islands International Film Festival Golden Carp Film Awards Favorite Actor – International God's Own Country Nominated [46]
2019 British Independent Film Awards Best Actor Only You Won [47]
2020 Barcelona-Sant Jordi International Film Festival Best Actor Hope Gap Won [48]
International Online Cinema Awards Halfway Award - Best Supporting Actor Emma Nominated [49]
Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series The Crown Nominated [49]
Online Film and Television Awards Best Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Nominated [50]
Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble Cast in a Drama Series Won [51]
British Academy Television Awards Best Supporting Actor Nominated [52]
Gold Derby TV Awards Best Drama Supporting Actor Nominated [53]
Breakthrough Performer of the Year Nominated [53]
2021 Critics' Choice Television Awards Best Actor in a Drama Series Won [54]
Golden Globe Awards Best Actor – Television Series Drama Won [55]
Satellite Awards Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film Nominated [56]
Screen Actors Guild Awards Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Drama Series Nominated [57]
Outstanding Performance by an Ensemble in a Drama Series Won [58]
British Academy Television Awards Best Actor Nominated [59]
International Online Cinema Awards Best Actor in a Drama Series Won [60]
Gold Derby TV Awards Best Drama Actor Won [61]
Hollywood Critics Association TV Awards Best Actor in a Streaming Series, Drama Won [62]
Primetime Emmy Awards Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Won [63]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Josh O'Connor: 'I had to advocate for Prince Charles on set. He's always told: shut up'". The Guardian. 28 November 2020. Archived from the original on 7 December 2020. Retrieved 8 December 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "Josh O'Connor". En Primeur. Archived from the original on 2 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  3. ^ a b c Brown, Emma. "Josh O'Connor". Interview Magazine. Archived from the original on 2 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  4. ^ Herman, James Patrick. "Verge List: Sundance 2017 – Josh O'Connor". Verge. Archived from the original on 2 December 2017. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  5. ^ Bunting, Madeleine (2016). Love of Country: A Journey Through the Hebrides. Granta Books. p. 16. ISBN 978-1847085177. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 28 November 2020.
  6. ^ a b Singh-Kurtz, Sangeeta (17 November 2020). "The Passion of Prince Charles". The Cut. Archived from the original on 29 November 2020. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  7. ^ a b c "5 Facts About Josh O'Connor". Masterpiece. Archived from the original on 17 January 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  8. ^ Sandwell, Ian. "Josh O'Connor, Stars of Tomorrow 2016". Screendaily. Archived from the original on 17 January 2018. Retrieved 12 March 2018.
  9. ^ "Farragut North". Jude Obermüller. Archived from the original on 2 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  10. ^ "Farragut North". Southwark Playhouse | Theatre and Bar. 4 September 2013. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  11. ^ "REVIEW: Versailles, Donmar Warehouse ✭✭✭✭". British Theatre. 7 March 2013. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  12. ^ "Oppenheimer five-star review – father of atomic bomb becomes tragic hero at RSC". The Guardian. 23 January 2015. Archived from the original on 2 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  13. ^ "The Shoemaker's Holiday review – cobblers drama gets a first-rate revival". The Guardian. 19 December 2014. Archived from the original on 2 September 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  14. ^ "BIFA 2017: Meet the Leads · BIFA · British Independent Film Awards". BIFA · British Independent Film Awards. 1 January 1970. Archived from the original on 12 August 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  15. ^ "Shudder Films' First Completed Feature Selected for Premiere at Sundance ‹ News and Opportunities ‹ Homepage". NFM. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 11 January 2017.
  16. ^ "God's Own Country · BIFA · British Independent Film Awards". British Independent Film Awards. Archived from the original on 17 November 2017. Retrieved 19 March 2020.
  17. ^ Kermode, Mark (14 July 2019). "Only You review – a perfectly realised story of love and longing". The Observer. Guardian Media Group. Archived from the original on 26 February 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  18. ^ "Only You · BIFA · British Independent Film Awards". British Independent Film Awards. Archived from the original on 19 January 2020. Retrieved 19 May 2020.
  19. ^ "Bafta TV Awards 2020: Winners in full". BBC News. 31 July 2020. Archived from the original on 24 November 2020. Retrieved 8 December 2020.
  20. ^ a b c d Shattuck, Kathryn (18 November 2020). "Josh O'Connor Didn't Care About the Crown Until He Became a Prince". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 30 August 2021. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  21. ^ a b c Schneider, Michael (22 September 2021). "'The Crown' Star Josh O'Connor on His Emmy Win and Why He's Eager to Shed Prince Charles". Variety. Retrieved 22 September 2021.
  22. ^ Tabberer, Jamie. "Josh O'Connor to star in queer horror film by Francis Lee". Attitude.co.uk. Archived from the original on 27 April 2021. Retrieved 27 April 2021.
  23. ^ Hipes, Patrick. "Josh O'Connor And Paul Mescal To Star In 'The History Of Sound'; Oliver Hermanus To Direct WWI Love Story – AFM". Deadline Hollywood.
  24. ^ "WATERLOGGED". JustGiving. Archived from the original on 24 February 2021. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  25. ^ Hodgkin, Beatrice (3 January 2020). "Josh O'Connor on life beyond The Crown". www.ft.com. Archived from the original on 24 November 2020. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  26. ^ "Olivia Colman and Josh O'Connor Visit the Stars Appeal". Stars Appeal. 18 January 2020. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  27. ^ "Your chance to have tea with Charles & Di". Grantham Matters. 7 December 2020. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  28. ^ AnOther (24 March 2021). "Josh O'Connor Heads to the Desert for Loewe's New Campaign". AnOther. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 3 September 2021.
  29. ^ Jocelyn Silver (13 November 2019). "The Little Mermaid Remake Finally Has Its Prince Eric". W Magazine. Archived from the original on 9 December 2020. Retrieved 28 November 2020.
  30. ^ "Cute Details About 'The Crown' Star Josh O'Connor's Relationship With Girlfriend, Margot Hauer-King". YourTango. 18 November 2020. Archived from the original on 1 December 2020. Retrieved 20 January 2021.
  31. ^ Hardington, Brooke (30 November 2020). "The truth about Josh O'Connor's girlfriend". NickiSwift.com. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 8 December 2020.
  32. ^ "The Drum's 50 Under 30: outstanding women in creative and digital, part 2". The Drum. Archived from the original on 28 January 2021. Retrieved 12 December 2020.
  33. ^ "Petite amie de Josh O'Connor: Qui est Margot Hauer-King?". 45secondes.fr. Archived from the original on 24 February 2021. Retrieved 20 January 2021.
  34. ^ O'Connor, Josh [@JoshOConnor15] (9 December 2019). "Morning. Vote Labour" (Tweet). Retrieved 8 December 2020 – via Twitter.
  35. ^ Shattuck, Kathryn. "The Crown's Josh O'Connor: 'I'm a republican. I'm not interested in the royal family'". The Irish Times. Archived from the original on 5 December 2020. Retrieved 8 December 2020.
  36. ^ "The Crown's Josh O'Connor Doesn't Even Want a Royal Family, Really". Esquire. 16 October 2020. Archived from the original on 15 November 2020. Retrieved 27 February 2021.
  37. ^ "Palmarés 2017 - 22º LesGaiCineMad". LesGaiCineMad 2021 (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  38. ^ "28th Stockholm International Film Festival Awards - JEUNE FEMME Wins Best Film". VIMooZ. 19 November 2017. Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  39. ^ Mitchell2017-11-20T07:38:00+00:00, Wendy. "'I Am Not A Witch', 'God's Own Country' among Stockholm winners". Screen. Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  40. ^ "Winners Nominations · BIFA · British Independent Film Awards". BIFA · British Independent Film Awards. 25 October 2017. Archived from the original on 22 January 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  41. ^ Cline, Rich (19 December 2017). "Three Billboards leads nominees for Critics' Circle Film Awards". The Critics' Circle. Archived from the original on 19 August 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  42. ^ Desk, Evening Standard Arts (15 December 2017). "Find out which films made the Evening Standard British Film Award longlist". www.standard.co.uk. Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  43. ^ Osullivan, Charlotte (24 January 2018). "Meet the breakthrough stars of this year's British Film Awards". www.standard.co.uk. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  44. ^ "Star Wars: The Last Jedi Wins Big at Rakuten TV Empire Awards 2018". Empire. Archived from the original on 19 March 2018. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  45. ^ "2018 Film EE Rising Star | BAFTA Awards". awards.bafta.org. Archived from the original on 28 October 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  46. ^ "Faro Island Film Festival (2018)". IMDb. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  47. ^ "Winners & Nominations · BIFA · British Independent Film Awards". BIFA · British Independent Film Awards. 21 October 2019. Archived from the original on 1 November 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  48. ^ "Palmarés". BCN Film Fest. Archived from the original on 3 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  49. ^ a b "International Online Cinema Awards (INOCA) (2020)". IMDb. Archived from the original on 2 August 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  50. ^ "Online Film & Television Association (2020)". IMDb. Archived from the original on 11 August 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  51. ^ "Outstanding Film and Television Performances Honored at the 26th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® | Screen Actors Guild Awards". www.sagawards.org. Archived from the original on 2 February 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  52. ^ "BAFTA TV 2020: Winners of the Virgin Media British Academy Television Awards and British Academy Television Craft Awards". www.bafta.org. 3 June 2020. Archived from the original on 24 December 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  53. ^ a b Sheehan, Daniel Montgomery,Chris Beachum,Marcus James Dixon,Joyce Eng,Zach Laws,Paul; Montgomery, Daniel; Beachum, Chris; Dixon, Marcus James; Eng, Joyce; Laws, Zach; Sheehan, Paul (16 September 2020). "2020 Gold Derby TV Awards winners: 'Schitt's' sweeps, 'Succession' succeeds, Reese Witherspoon rules and much more". GoldDerby. Archived from the original on 30 November 2020. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  54. ^ "Critics Choice Awards | Critics Choice Awards". Archived from the original on 9 December 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  55. ^ "Winners & Nominees 2021". www.goldenglobes.com. Archived from the original on 2 August 2019. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  56. ^ "2020 Winners | International Press Academy". Archived from the original on 1 February 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  57. ^ "Nominations Announced for the 27th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards | Screen Actors Guild Awards". www.sagawards.org. Archived from the original on 4 February 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  58. ^ "27th Annual Screen Actors Guild Awards® Celebrate Outstanding Film and Television Performances | Screen Actors Guild Awards". www.sagawards.org. Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  59. ^ "BAFTA TV 2021: The Winners and Nominations for the Virgin Media British Academy Television Awards and British Academy Television Craft Awards". www.bafta.org. 28 April 2021. Archived from the original on 5 June 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  60. ^ "International Online Cinema Awards (INOCA) (2021)". IMDb. Archived from the original on 27 July 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  61. ^ Sheehan, Daniel Montgomery,Chris Beachum,Marcus James Dixon,Joyce Eng,Tom O'Neil,Christopher Rosen,Paul; Montgomery, Daniel; Beachum, Chris; Dixon, Marcus James; Eng, Joyce; O'Neil, Tom; Rosen, Christopher; Sheehan, Paul (18 August 2021). "Gold Derby TV Awards winners announced; Watch 20+ acceptance speeches by big winners from 'Ted Lasso,' 'The Crown' and …". GoldDerby. Archived from the original on 26 August 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  62. ^ Schneider, Michael (30 August 2021). "'Ted Lasso,' 'The Crown,' 'The Mandalorian,' 'Cruel Summer,' 'New Amsterdam' Among HCA TV Awards Winners". Variety. Archived from the original on 1 September 2021. Retrieved 1 September 2021.
  63. ^ Cordero, Rosy (20 September 2021). "'The Crown' Star Josh O'Connor Wins Best Actor In A Drama Series". Deadline. Retrieved 20 September 2021.

External links

This page was last edited on 18 November 2021, at 16:45
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.