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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jordy Nelson
refer to caption
Nelson with the Green Bay Packers in 2011
No. 87, 82
Position:Wide receiver
Personal information
Born: (1985-05-31) May 31, 1985 (age 34)
Manhattan, Kansas
Height:6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight:217 lb (98 kg)
Career information
High school:Riley County (Riley, Kansas)
College:Kansas State
NFL Draft:2008 / Round: 2 / Pick: 36
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Receptions:613
Receiving yards:8,587
Receiving touchdowns:72
Return yards:1,436
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Jordy Ray Nelson (born May 31, 1985) is a former American football wide receiver. He played college football at Kansas State, where he received All-America honors, and was drafted by the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL) in the second round of the 2008 NFL Draft. During his tenure in Green Bay, he was regarded by sports analysts as one of the elite wide receivers in the NFL, and won Super Bowl XLV with the team over the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 2010 season.[1][2][3][4][5] After spending 10 seasons in Green Bay, he played one year with the Oakland Raiders before announcing his retirement.

Early life

Nelson was born in Manhattan, Kansas, to Alan and Kim Nelson, farmers who lived in Riley and had season tickets to Kansas State football games. The Nelson farm, established by his great-great-grandfather who immigrated from Sweden, has been in the family for four generations.[6]

Nelson attended Riley County High School in Riley, Kansas, and played football for the Falcons. During his senior year playing quarterback, he completed 62 percent of his passes for 1,029 yards and eight touchdowns. Nelson also rushed for 1,572 yards, averaging 9.8 yards per carry with 25 touchdowns. He was named Flint Hills Player of the Year by the Manhattan Mercury.[7] In 2003, he played in the Kansas Shrine Bowl.[8] In addition to football, he was an all-state basketball player, averaging 17.2 points per game his senior year.[9]

Nelson was an outstanding track and field athlete and won a national AAU championship in the 400 meters as a 10-year-old. In 2003, his senior year at Riley County High School, he won the state titles in Class 3A in the 100 meters, with a time of 10.63 seconds; 200 meters, with a time of 21.64 seconds; 400 meters, with a time of 48.79; and long jump, with a leap of 7.00 meters.[10]

College career

Nelson attended Kansas State University, where he played for coach Bill Snyder's Wildcats football team from 2003 through 2005.[11][12][13] When Snyder retired after the 2005 season,[14] Nelson remained with Kansas State and played the rest of his college career (2006[15] and 2007[16]) under Ron Prince.[17]

2003–2004 seasons

Nelson began his college career as a walk-on at Kansas State and took his redshirt year as a member of the Wildcats' 2003 Big 12 Championship team.[18]

For 2004, Nelson was set to play defensive back, but during spring practice following his first year, Snyder moved him to the wide receiver position. He did not record any meaningful statistics in the 2004 season.[19]

2005 season

Nelson started the 2005 season against FIU. Against the Golden Panthers, he had four receptions for 36 yards. He caught his first career collegiate touchdown, an eight-yard pass from quarterback Allen Webb, in the 35–21 victory.[20] Including the season opener, Nelson caught a touchdown in seven straight games that he appeared in.[21] In that seven-game stretch, Nelson's best performance came against Oklahoma in a 43–21 loss where he had three receptions for 107 yards and a touchdown, which was a 73-yard reception from Webb.[22] Kansas State struggled down the stretch of the season and did not make a bowl game. In the final game of the season, Nelson had seven receptions for 74 yards and a touchdown in a 36–28 victory over Missouri.[23]

During his sophomore season, Nelson caught 45 passes for eight touchdowns.[24]

2006 season

In his junior season, Nelson was listed on the Biletnikoff Award watchlist, which is an award for the most outstanding receiver in college football. Injuries kept him off the field most of his junior year, leading to a disappointing junior season, in which he caught only 39 passes for one touchdown.[24]

Nelson did have some highlights in the 2006 season despite not getting to play as much. In the season opener against Illinois State, Nelson had four receptions for 62 yards in the narrow 24–23 victory.[25] On November 4, against Colorado, Nelson turned in his best effort of the season with five receptions for 117 yards and a touchdown in the 34–21 victory.[26] One week later, against Texas, Nelson had a quiet day with only three receptions for 15 yards, but he threw a successful pass for 28 yards in the 45–42 victory.[27]

2007 season

After going unnoticed during his junior year, Nelson broke out during his senior year and was among the nation's best wide receivers. In the season opener against #18 Auburn, he had nine receptions for 90 yards. In addition, he threw a 21-yard touchdown pass to running back Leon Patton in the third quarter of the 23–13 loss.[28] Two weeks later, against Missouri State, he had a great performance with 15 receptions for 209 yards and a touchdown in the 61–10 victory. For the second time in his senior season, he threw a touchdown pass, which was a 24-yard pass to wide receiver Deon Murphy.[29] Two weeks later, against Texas, Nelson had 12 receptions for 116 yards and a touchdown in the 41–21 victory. In addition, he had an 89-yard punt return touchdown.[30] The next week, against Kansas, Nelson had another great outing with 10 receptions for 137 yards and a touchdown in the 30–24 loss.[31] After the 47–20 victory over Colorado, Nelson put together a string of six consecutive games with a receiving touchdown to end the season.[32] On October 20, against Oklahoma State, Nelson had 12 receptions for 176 yards and three touchdowns in the 41–39 loss.[33] Against the Baylor Bears, Nelson had eight receptions for 105 yards and a touchdown. In addition, he had a 92-yard punt return touchdown in the 51–13 victory.[34] Against Iowa State on November 3, Nelson had 14 receptions for 214 yards and touchdown in the 31–20 loss.[35] In the following game against Nebraska, Nelson had nine receptions for 125 yards and a touchdown in the 73–31 loss.[36] Against Missouri the next week, he had eight receptions for 94 yards and a touchdown in the 49–32 loss.[37] Against Fresno State, Nelson had 15 receptions for 165 yards and a touchdown in the 45–29 loss.[38] The game against Fresno State was the last game of Nelson's college career as it knocked Kansas State out of bowl eligibility.[39]

Nelson earned consensus All-American honors and was a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award after catching 122 passes for 1,606 yards and 11 touchdowns.[24] Nelson also showed his versatility by throwing two touchdown passes and returning two punts for touchdowns.[40]

College statistics

Receiving
Year Team GP Rec Yds TD
2005 Kansas State 11 45 669 8
2006 Kansas State 13 39 547 1
2007 Kansas State 12 122 1,606 11
Total 36 206 2,822 20
Source: sports-reference.com

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Ht Wt Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad Wonderlic
6 ft 2 58 in
(1.90 m)
217 lb
(98 kg)
32 12 in
(0.83 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.51 s 1.50 s 2.59 s 4.35 s 7.03 s 31 in
(0.79 m)
10 ft 3 in
(3.12 m)
28
All values are from NFL Combine[41][42][43]

Green Bay Packers

2008 season: Rookie year

Nelson was selected in the second round (36th overall) by the Green Bay Packers in the 2008 NFL Draft.[44] He was the third wide receiver taken in the draft, after Donnie Avery and Devin Thomas. In addition, he was one of two Kansas State Wildcats to be selected that year.[45]

On July 27, 2008, Nelson signed his rookie contract with the Packers.[46]

Jordy Nelson in August 2011
Jordy Nelson in August 2011

Nelson scored his first touchdown reception on September 14, 2008, against the Detroit Lions, a 29-yard pass from quarterback Aaron Rodgers. The touchdown was his lone reception in the 48–25 victory.[47] A second touchdown followed in Week 14 against the Houston Texans.[48] The season was a struggle for Nelson and the Packers as they finished 6–10 and missed the playoffs.[49] Nelson finished his rookie campaign with 33 receptions for 366 yards.[50]

2009 season

On December 20, 2009, Nelson had four receptions for a season-high 71 yards against the Pittsburgh Steelers.[51] On January 3, 2010, he had one reception for 51 yards in the regular season finale against the Arizona Cardinals.[52] In the 2009 season, Nelson played in 13 games for the Packers, catching 22 passes for 320 yards and two touchdowns.[50] In addition, he saw action as the primary kick returner for most of the 2009 season.

Nelson and the Packers finished 11–5 and made the playoffs as the fifth seed.[53][54] The Packers fell to the Arizona Cardinals in the Wild Card round by a score of 51–45. Nelson had one reception for 11 yards and a touchdown in his playoff debut.[55]

2010 season: Super Bowl season

Nelson's role with the Packers expanded in the 2010 season. On November 28, Nelson had five receptions for 61 yards and his first receiving touchdown of the season against the Atlanta Falcons.[56] On December 26, he had four receptions for 124 yards and a touchdown against the New York Giants.[57]

In the 2010 season, Nelson set career highs with 582 receiving yards and 45 catches, while catching two touchdown passes for the third straight year.[58] Following the injury to Aaron Rodgers against the Detroit Lions on December 12, 2010, it was revealed that Nelson was third on the Packers' quarterback depth chart.[59]

Nelson and the Packers made the playoffs as the sixth seed after a 10–6 regular season. Nelson had a quiet day with only one target against the Philadelphia Eagles in the 21–16 victory in the Wild Card round.[60] He picked it up in the Divisional round against the Atlanta Falcons with eight receptions for 79 yards and a touchdown in the 48–21 victory.[61] In the NFC Championship, against the longtime rival Chicago Bears, he had four receptions for 61 yards in the narrow 21–14 victory. With the victory, he advanced to his first appearance in the Super Bowl.[62][63]

Two weeks later, Nelson caught a 29-yard touchdown pass on third-and-1 with Steeler William Gay covering for the first score of Super Bowl XLV. "This was Jordy last week: 'I think we need to convert on third downs to win the game.' ... Rodgers threw a terrific pass, capping an 80-yard touchdown drive," a live-blog reported.[64] He recovered from a drop early in the fourth quarter to catch a 38-yard pass on the next play, taking the Packers to the Steelers' two-yard line.[65] Nelson was the top receiver of the game with nine receptions for 140 yards (both career highs),[66] while also gaining 19 more yards on a kick return in the 31–25 victory.[67]

2011 season

Jordy Nelson in November 2011
Jordy Nelson in November 2011

After winning his first Super Bowl Championship, Nelson and Packers looked to repeat as champions. On September 8, Nelson had six receptions for 77 yards and a touchdown against the New Orleans Saints.[68] On September 18, he had an 84-yard touchdown reception against the Carolina Panthers.[69] On October 2, he had five receptions for 91 yards and a touchdown against the Denver Broncos.[70]

Combined with his strong performance in Super Bowl XLV, and this good start to the 2011 season, Nelson signed a three-year, $13.35 million contract extension early into the season on October 2, 2011.

On October 16, Nelson had two receptions for 104 yards and a touchdown against the St. Louis Rams.[71] On November 6, he had five receptions for 105 yards and a touchdown against the San Diego Chargers.[72] He followed up his solid performance against the Chargers on November 14, when he had five receptions for 63 yards and two touchdowns against the Minnesota Vikings.[73] Nelson continued his good stretch the next week on November 20, when he had six receptions for 123 yards and two touchdowns against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[74] On Christmas Day, he had six receptions for 115 yards and two touchdowns against the Chicago Bears.[75] In the regular season finale on January 1, 2012, he had nine receptions for 162 yards and three touchdowns against the Detroit Lions.[76]

Nelson finished the 2011 regular season with career highs in touchdowns (15), receptions (68), and receiving yards (1,263).[50] He had a career-high three touchdown receptions in the season finale against the Detroit Lions, and moved into sole possession of third place for most receiving touchdowns in a single season in Packers franchise history, behind only Sterling Sharpe (18) and Don Hutson (17).[77] He was named a Pro Bowl alternate.[78]

The Packers went 15–1 in the 2011 regular season and earned the first seed in the NFC and a first round bye.[79][80] However, Nelson and the Packers fell to the eventual Super Bowl XLVI champion New York Giants in the Divisional round of the playoffs and ended their chance of a repeat championship.[81] Nelson was ranked 80th by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2012.[82]

2012 season

On September 9, 2012, Nelson started the 2012 season with five receptions for 64 yards against the San Francisco 49ers.[83] On September 30, he had eight receptions for 93 yards and a touchdown against the New Orleans Saints.[84] On October 14, he had nine receptions for 121 yards and three touchdowns against the Houston Texans.[85] On October 21, he had eight receptions for 122 yards and a touchdown against the St. Louis Rams.[86] On December 30, 2012, Nelson had three receptions for 87 yards and a touchdown against the Minnesota Vikings.[87]

In the 2012 season, Nelson played in 12 games, starting ten; he missed four games and most of another two games due to a hamstring injury.[88] He had 49 receptions for 745 yards and scored seven touchdowns in the 2012 season.[10]

Nelson and the Packers finished with an 11–5 record, won the NFC North and made the playoffs as the third seed.[89][90] In the Wild Card round, against the Minnesota Vikings, he had three receptions for 51 yards in the 24–10 victory.[91] In the Divisional round, against the San Francisco 49ers, he had five receptions for 46 yards in the 45–31 loss.[92]

2013 season

On September 8, 2013, Nelson started the season with seven receptions for 130 yards and a touchdown against the San Francisco 49ers.[93] The next week, he had three receptions for 66 yards and two touchdowns against the Washington Redskins.[94] He continued his solid start to the season the following week, when he had eight receptions for 93 yards against the Cincinnati Bengals.[95] On October 13, he had four receptions for 113 yards and a touchdown against the Baltimore Ravens.[96] On October 27, he had seven receptions for 123 yards and two touchdowns against the Minnesota Vikings.[97] On November 17, he had eight receptions for 117 yards against the New York Giants.[98] Nelson closed out his 2013 regular season on December 29, when he had 10 receptions for 161 yards against the Chicago Bears.[99]

In the 2013 season, Nelson posted career highs with 85 receptions for 1,314 yards (a 15.5 average) and eight touchdowns.[10] In the 2013 season, he started all 16 games for the first time in his career and was again named as a Pro Bowl alternate.[100]

Nelson and the Packers finished with an 8–7–1 record, won the NFC North and made the playoffs in the 2013 season.[101][102] However, they fell to the San Francisco 49ers in the Wild Card round by a score of 23–20.[103] He was ranked 83rd by his fellow players on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2014.[104]

2014 season

On July 26, 2014, Nelson signed a four-year extension worth $39 million, receiving an $11.5 million signing bonus toward a guaranteed $14.2 million.[105]

In the season opener against the defending Super Bowl XLVIII champion Seattle Seahawks, Nelson had nine receptions for 83 yards.[106] During Week 2 against the New York Jets, Nelson had nine receptions for a career-high 209 yards and a touchdown. It was his first career 200-yard receiving game as the Packers defeated the Jets, 31–24, despite having trailed 21–3.[107] He became the first Packer since Javon Walker in 2004 to have 200 or more receiving yards in a single game.[108] On September 28, he had ten receptions for 108 yards and two touchdowns against the Chicago Bears.[109] On October 2, he had a 66-yard touchdown reception against the Minnesota Vikings.[110] On October 12, he had nine receptions for 107 yards and a touchdown against the Miami Dolphins.[111] On November 9, he had six receptions for 152 yards and two touchdowns in another strong performance against the Chicago Bears.[112] The next week, he had four receptions for 109 yards and a touchdown against the Philadelphia Eagles.[113] On December 8, he had eight receptions for 146 yards and two touchdowns against the Atlanta Falcons.[114] On December 21, he had nine receptions for 113 yards and a touchdown against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers.[115]

With a career-high 1,519 receiving yards on the season, Nelson passed Robert Brooks (1,497) to capture the franchise record for receiving yards in a season.[116]

Nelson and Packers went 12–4 and made the playoffs in the 2014 season. As the second seed, they earned a first-round bye.[117] In the Division round against the Dallas Cowboys, he had a quiet day with two receptions for 22 yards but the team was able to advance in a 26–21 victory.[118] In the NFC Championship, he had five receptions for 71 yards as the Packers fell to the defending Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks by a score of 28–22 in overtime.[119] He was named to his first career Pro Bowl for the 2014 season.[120] He was ranked 18th by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2015.[121]

2015 season: Lost season

In a Week 2 preseason game against the Pittsburgh Steelers at Heinz Field, Nelson caught an eight-yard pass from Aaron Rodgers, but then fell to the turf without contact. He limped to the sidelines with an apparent knee injury and did not return to the game. MRI scans deemed that Nelson had torn the ACL in his right knee. He remained inactive for the remainder of the 2015 season.[122]

2016 season

In his first game back from injury in the season opener on September 11, 2016, Nelson had six receptions for 32 yards and a touchdown against the Jacksonville Jaguars.[123] The next week, he had five receptions for 73 yards and a touchdown against the Minnesota Vikings.[124] Nelson's hot streak continued in the next week, when he had six receptions for 101 yards and two touchdowns against the Detroit Lions.[125] On November 13, he had 12 receptions for 126 yards and a touchdown against the Tennessee Titans.[126] On December 4, 2016, he had eight receptions for 118 yards and a touchdown against the Houston Texans.[127] On December 11, he had six receptions for 41 yards and two touchdowns against the Seattle Seahawks.[128] On Christmas Eve, he had nine receptions for 154 yards and two touchdowns in another strong performance against the Minnesota Vikings.[129]

Nelson and the Packers finished with a 10–6 record, won the NFC North and reached the playoffs as the fourth seed in the 2016 season.[130][131] In the Wild Card round against the New York Giants, he had one reception for 13 yards in the 38–13 victory.[132] Due to a rib injury sustained against the Giants, he did not play in the Divisional round against the Dallas Cowboys, but the Packers won 34–31 and advanced.[133][134] The next week, Nelson returned and six receptions for 67 yards and a touchdown, but the team fell to the Atlanta Falcons by a score of 44–21 in the NFC Championship in the final NFL game at the Georgia Dome.[135]

Nelson's successful return season had 97 receptions, 1,257 receiving yards, and 14 touchdowns in 2016. His 14 receiving touchdowns led the NFL for the 2016 season.[136] In Week 15, he caught a 60-yard pass from Rodgers to put the Packers in position to kick a field goal and win against the Bears 30–27. He was named the NFL Comeback Player of the Year for the 2016 season after missing the entire 2015 season with the torn ACL.[137] At the 2017 ESPY Awards won the award for Best Comeback Athlete.[138] He finished the season in the top ten active players in touchdown and receiving yards. Nelson was ranked 48th by his peers on the NFL Top 100 Players of 2017.[139]

2017 season

On September 10, 2017, in the season opener against the Seattle Seahawks, Nelson caught the lone passing touchdown from Aaron Rodgers in the 17–9 victory.[140] In Week 2, against the Atlanta Falcons, Nelson left with a minor injury early in the game, breaking a streak of 53 consecutive games with a reception.[141] His last game with no receptions came in Week 9 of the 2012 season against the Arizona Cardinals.[142] The next week, against the Cincinnati Bengals, he caught two touchdowns to pass Sterling Sharpe for second in franchise history in the 27–24 overtime victory.[143] In Week 6 against the Minnesota Vikings, Aaron Rodgers was taken off the field by his coaches and medical personnel after suffering a shoulder injury on a hit from Anthony Barr. Shortly thereafter, it was revealed that Rodgers suffered a fractured right collarbone.[144][145] Rodgers was forced to miss time, and Nelson's usual statistical volume dropped. Over the course of the rest of the season, his best game was 35 receiving yards against the Detroit Lions in a 30–17 loss on November 6.[146] He finished the season with 53 receptions for 482 yards and six touchdowns.[147]

On March 13, 2018, Nelson was released by the Packers after 10 seasons.[148]

Oakland Raiders

On March 15, 2018, Nelson signed a two-year contract with the Oakland Raiders.[149][150] After recording 53 yards combined in his first two games with the Raiders, Nelson had six receptions for a season-high 173 receiving yards and a touchdown in Week 3 against the Miami Dolphins.[151] He scored receiving touchdowns in the next two games against the Cleveland Browns and Los Angeles Chargers.[152][153] After Amari Cooper was traded to the Dallas Cowboys, Nelson's role expanded in the offense.[154] In his last five games of the season, Nelson totaled 38 receptions for 386 receiving yards to give him 739 receiving yards on the 2018 season.[155]

On March 14, 2019, Nelson was released by the Raiders after one season.[156]

Retirement

On March 27, 2019, Nelson announced his retirement from the NFL after 11 seasons.[157] On August 4, 2019 he signed a one-day contract to retire as a Green Bay Packer.[158]

NFL career statistics

Regular season

Year Team Games Receiving Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Fum Lost
2008 GB 16 2 33 366 11.1 29 2 0 0
2009 GB 13 0 22 320 14.5 51 2 3 1
2010 GB 16 4 45 582 12.9 80 2 3 3
2011 GB 16 9 68 1,263 18.6 93 15 0 0
2012 GB 12 10 49 745 15.2 73 7 0 0
2013 GB 16 16 85 1,314 15.5 76 8 0 0
2014 GB 16 16 98 1,519 15.5 80 13 0 0
2016 GB 16 16 97 1,257 13.0 60 14 1 1
2017 GB 15 15 53 482 9.1 58 6 0 0
2018 OAK 15 14 63 739 11.7 66 3 1 0
Total 150 102 613 8,587 14.0 93 72 8 5
Source: NFL.com

Postseason

Year Team Games Receiving Fumbles
G GS Rec Yds Avg Lng TD Fum Lost
2009 GB 1 0 1 11 11.0 11 1 1 0
2010 GB 4 3 21 286 13.6 38 2 0 0
2011 GB 1 0 3 39 13.0 17 0 0 0
2012 GB 2 0 8 97 12.1 23 0 0 0
2013 GB 1 1 7 62 8.9 19 1 0 0
2014 GB 2 2 7 93 13.3 23 0 0 0
2016 GB 2 2 7 80 11.4 27 1 0 0
Total 13 8 54 668 12.4 38 5 1 0
Source: pro-football-reference.com

Personal life

Nelson married his longtime girlfriend, Emily (née Roethlisberger), in 2007, after proposing during a family vacation to Cancun. Emily played basketball at Bethel College in Kansas.[159] The couple have two sons, Royal and Brooks,[160] and an adopted daughter, Adda Jo.[161]

Nelson is a Christian and has spoken about his faith by saying, "Now, as a husband, father and, most importantly, as a Christian, I can see the Super Bowl Champion label with a greater perspective. I know it's an opportunity to share the most important truth of life: the gospel of the Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ."[162]

On August 20, 2015, Nelson's alma mater, Kansas State, revealed that they would name their football team's locker room the "Nelson Family Locker Room" after him after Nelson donated an undisclosed amount to renovate their athletic facilities.[163]

After the end of an NFL season, Nelson returns to his family farm in Riley, Kansas. He puts in work up to 12 hours a day. Some of the tasks he does are driving a combine to cut wheat or rounding up the 1,000-cow herd in Riley. Nelson said that he identifies more as a farmer than as a football player.[164] His parents are local restaurant owners in Leonardville, Kansas.[165]

References

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  2. ^ Wesseling, Chris (October 10, 2013). "Dez Bryant climbing ATL's wide receiver rankings". NFL.com. Retrieved October 14, 2014.
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External links


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