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Jonestown: Paradise Lost

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jonestown: Paradise Lost
Written byJason Sherman
Directed byTim Wolochatiuk
Narrated byTed Biggs
Theme music composerSimon Cloquet
Country of originCanada
France
South Africa
Original languageEnglish
Production
ProducersCatherine Berthillier
Greta Knutzen
CinematographyGilles Arnaud
EditorStephan Talneau
Running time100 minutes
Production companiesFilm Afrika Worldwide
Cineflix Productions
Release
Original networkHistory Channel
Original release
  • January 15, 2007 (2007-01-15)[1]

Jonestown: Paradise Lost is a 2007 documentary television film on the History Channel about the final days of Jonestown, the Peoples Temple, and Jim Jones. From eyewitness and survivor accounts, the program recreates the last week before the mass murder-suicide on November 18, 1978.

Summary

The film documents the final days of the Peoples Temple at Jonestown, Guyana. Interspersed with interviews from survivors, dramatic recreations of the events show how Reverend Jim Jones becomes increasingly paranoid and erratic as pressures build on him, both inside the compound and from the United States. When Congressman Leo Ryan insists on visiting, Jones alternates between reluctant acceptance and refusal. Ultimately, Jones allows Ryan, several journalists, and the Concerned Relatives representatives to visit the compound. Jones coaches the Peoples Temple members on what to say, but is surprised by a series of defections. Jones orders the deaths of all involved and forces the members of the Temple to commit mass suicide. Hyacinth Thrash, an elderly member, hides and survives. Sherwin Harris, who never visited the compound itself, survives, but his estranged ex-wife, Sharon, and daughter, Lianne, both commit suicide. Vernon Gosney and Tim Reiterman escape the assassination of Ryan, but both are shot and wounded by the assassins. Stephan Jones, Jim Jones' son, was not at the compound during the massacre.

Cast

  • Ted Biggs (narrator)

Interviews

  • Stephan Jones, Jim Jones' son
  • Vernon Gosney, former Peoples Temple member
  • Tim Reiterman, journalist and author who was shot in Guyana
  • Sherwin Harris, a member of the Concerned Relatives

Dramatic recreations

  • Rick Roberts as Jim Jones
  • Quentin Krog as Stephan Jones
  • Brendan Murray as Vernon Gosney
  • Alon Nashman as Sherwin Harris
  • Greg Ellwand as Congressman Leo Ryan
  • Kevin Otto as Tim Reiterman
  • Roxanne Blaise as Monica Bagby
  • Cindi Sampson as Christine Miller
  • Victoria Bartlett as Marceline Jones
  • Nicole Crozier as Liane Harris
  • Dean Slater as Don Harris
  • Adrienne Pierce as Sharon Amos
  • Patrick Lyster as Charles Garry
  • Olive Cele as Hyacinth Thrash

Release

Jonestown: Paradise Lost aired on the History Channel on January 15, 2007.[1] It was then shown at the Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival on March 5, 2007, followed by its Canadian TV premiere on VisionTV on March 13, 2007.[2]

Reception

Ginia Bellafante of The New York Times wrote that the film "methodically clocks through the cult's final days", but Stephan Jones, Jim Jones' son, is "mesmerizing to watch". Bellafante faults the documentary for not interviewing Stephan further.[1] Stephan has said that he has no intention of watching the documentary.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c Bellafante, Ginia (2007-01-15). "Clocking a Cult's Final Days in Jonestown". The New York Times. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  2. ^ Salem, Rob (2007-03-07). "Jonestown revisited". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2014-07-31.
  3. ^ "The son who survived Jonestown". The Gazette. Montreal. 2007-03-09. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2014-07-31 – via Canada.com.

External links

This page was last edited on 10 May 2021, at 22:54
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