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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Kerins
Johnkerins.jpg
First baseman
Born: (1858-07-15)July 15, 1858
Indianapolis, Indiana
Died: September 8, 1919(1919-09-08) (aged 61)
Louisville, Kentucky
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
May 1, 1884, for the Indianapolis Hoosiers
Last MLB appearance
June 15, 1890, for the St. Louis Browns
MLB statistics
Hits561
Home runs20
Runs batted in217
Teams
As player
As manager

John Nelson Kerins (July 15, 1858 – September 8, 1919), sometimes known as Jack Kerins, was an American Major League Baseball player who appeared mainly at first base but also at catcher and in the outfield. He played for the Indianapolis Hoosiers (1884), Louisville Colonels (1885-1889), Baltimore Orioles (1889) and St. Louis Browns (1890). He was a player-manager for Louisville in 1888 and for St. Louis in 1890, and he umpired American Association games through 1891.

Biography

Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, Kerins began his major league career with the 1884 Indianapolis Hoosiers of the American Association. After the season, the Hoosiers folded, and John moved on to the Louisville Colonels, where he spent the next few seasons.[1]

Though Kerins played twice as many career major league games at first base as he did at catcher, he was often known more for his play at the latter position. In Louisville, he was the personal catcher for left-handed knuckleball pitcher Toad Ramsey.[2] He led the league's catchers in 1886 with 157 assists despite catching only 65 games. Many of those assists came on one of Ramsey's 499 strikeouts that season when Kerins would mishandle a Ramsey knuckleball, which necessitated a throw to first base to complete the strikeout.[3] Offensively, the 1887 season may have been his best; he hit .294 with a league-leading 19 triples and 49 stolen bases.[1]

Kerins finished the 1889 season with the Baltimore Orioles. Before the 1890 season, Kerins was working as a bartender in Indianapolis. He returned to the Orioles for the 1890 season but did not play in any regular season games before he was released in May of that year; he played for the St. Louis Browns for the rest of the season, concluding his playing career.[1] In addition to playing, twice he was named interim manager, once with the Colonels in 1888 and also in his one season with the Browns.[1] He also umpired a total of 246 major league games, mostly in the American Association from 1889 to 1891. His appointment as an AA umpire was made official in April 1891, after Kerins had retired as a player.[4]

By 1895, Kerins was working as a bartender at a Louisville bar partly owned by major league outfielder Tom Brown.[5] In 1907, when another man of the same name was hired as an AA umpire, Kerins was still working as a bartender.[6] Late in life, Kerins worked as a houseman at the Tyler Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky. He suffered from rheumatism and died after two weeks in a Louisville hospital in 1919.[2] He was buried in a potter's field, but he was later reinterred at Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d John Kerins Stats. Baseball-Reference.com. Accessed April 14, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Former catcher passes away". The Tennessean. September 28, 1919.
  3. ^ Nemec, David (2011). Major League Baseball Profiles, 1871-1900, Volume 1: The Ballplayers Who Built the Game. U of Nebraska Press. p. 310. ISBN 9780803230248.
  4. ^ "Umpire appointed". The Inter Ocean. April 19, 1891.
  5. ^ "Can this be true?". Washington Times. November 10, 1895.
  6. ^ "Funny yarn about Old Jack Kerins". Courier-Journal. January 31, 1907.
  7. ^ Cava, Pete (2015). Indiana-Born Major League Baseball Players: A Biographical Dictionary, 1871-2014. McFarland. p. 104. ISBN 9781476622705.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 June 2020, at 03:12
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