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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Farrow
John Farrow family 1950.jpg
John Farrow and family in 1950
Born
John Villiers Farrow

(1904-02-10)10 February 1904
Sydney, Australia
Died27 January 1963(1963-01-27) (aged 58)
Resting placeHoly Cross Cemetery, Culver City
OccupationActor, director, producer, screenwriter
Years active1927–1962
Spouse(s)
Felice Lewin
(m. 1924; annulled 1934)

Children8, including Patrick, Mia, Prudence, and Tisa Farrow

John Villiers Farrow, KGCHS (10 February 1904 – 27 January 1963)[1] was an Australian-born American film director, producer and screenwriter. In 1957, he won the Academy Award for Best Writing/Best Screenplay for Around the World in Eighty Days and in 1942, he was nominated as Best Director for Wake Island. He had seven children by his wife, actress Maureen O'Sullivan, including actress Mia Farrow.

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  • ✪ Prudence Farrow Bruns | Conversations with Jeff Weeks | WSRE

Transcription

THANK YOU. >> THIS ORIGINAL WSRE PRESENTATION IS MADE POSSIBLE BY VIEWERS LIKE YOU. THANK YOU. >> THE BEATLES, GROWING UP IN HOLLYWOOD AND MEDITATION, PRUDENCE FARROW BRUNS ON THIS EDITION OF CONVERSATIONS. >> BY ANY DEFINITION PRUDENCE FARROW BRUNS HAS LIVED A FASCINATING AND INTRIGUING LIFE. SHE GREW UP IN HOLLYWOOD. THE DAUGHTER OF ACTRESS MAUREEN O'SULLIVAN FAMOUS FOR PLAYING JANE IN TARZAN MOVIES AND FILM DIRECTOR JOHN FARROW. HER SISTER IS ACTRESS MIA FARROW. BUT FOR PRUDENCE, HER PASSIONS WERE A WORLD AWAY IN INDIA WHERE SHE WOULD STUDY AND LEARN TRANSMEDICATION. HER ENTHUSIASM WAS SUCH THAT IT INSPIRED JOHN LENNON TO WRITE A SONG ABOUT HER. YES, SHE'S THAT PRUDENCE, DEAR PRUDENCE, FROM THE 1968 BEATLES WHITE ALBUM. SHE'S AN EXPERT AND RESPECTED TEACHER IN THE PRACTICE OF MEDITATION. SHE'S AN ACCOMPLISHED FILM PRODUCER, SPEAKER AND AUTHOR. HER MEMOIR IS ENTITLED, DEAR PRUDENCE, THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG. WE WELCOME PRUDENCE FARROW BRUNS TO CONVERSATIONS. THANK YOU FOR JOINING US. >> YOU'RE WELCOME. >> FASCINATING LIFE YOU HAVE LIVED. I ENJOYED READING THEK BOOM TELL ME ABOUT THAT, THE STORY MIND THE SONG. WHAT IS THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG? >> THAT'S A GOOD QUESTION. THE BOOKENDS IN INDIA WITH THE SONG BEING WRITTEN BUT THE STORY BEHIND IT IS WHAT BROUGHT ME TO INDIA. IT'S ACTUALLY THE STORY OF A LOT OF PEOPLE MY AGE, A GENERATION WE CALL THE '60s. AND IT KIND OF EXPLAINS WHAT TO PLACE -- TOOK PLACE DURING THAT TIME FROM A PERSPECTIVE NOT USUALLY ADDRESSED. WE SEE IT IN TERMS OF VIETNAM WAR, IN TERMS OF MUSIC, AND THE DIFFERENT THINGS THAT WENT ON BUT NOT IN TERMS OF SORT OF THE CRISIS THAT A LOT OF US WENT THROUGH PERSONALLY. WHETHER IT -- PEOPLE WERE DRAFTED INTO A WAR THAT NOBODY QUITE UNDERSTOOD, THERE WERE NO HEROES. OR WHETHER YOU KNOW, IT WAS THE INTRODUCTION OF LSD AND HALLUCINOGENS THAT BROUGHT CONFUSION TO OUR COMING OF AGE OR WHETHER IT WAS BECAUSE OF A TSUNAMI OF ALL THOSE THINGS WITH THE WAR AND WITH WE WATCHED AS WE CAME OF AGE OUR PRESIDENT BE SHOT BEFORE OUR EYES WHO REPRESENTED HOPE. SO THERE WERE A LOT OF US INCLUDING THE BEATLES THAT FELT THE NEED TO TURN IN WARD TO FIND MORE THAN OUR SOCIETY OR WORLD WAS OFFERING. WE WERE ON THE PRECIPICE OF WHAT WE FELT OUR CULTURE FELT COULD BE A THIRD WORLD WAR. WE HAD THE H BOMB. WE HAD GONE THROUGH THE BAY OF PIGS WHICH WAS VERY FRIGHTENING. MY FATHER BUILT A WHOLE BOMB SHELTER UNDER OUR HOUSE. AND STOCKED IT FOR A YEAR. SO THERE WERE A LOT OF O THINGS THAT MADE US QUESTION WHAT IT MEANT TO BE AN ADULT AND WHAT DIRECTION DID WE WANT TO TAKE THE WORLD. THAT IF WE TOOK IT IN THE WAY IT HAD BEEN GOING WITH THE TECHNOLOGY WE HAD THEN WHICH WAS THE H BOMB, THAT WE WOULDN'T SURVIVE. SO THERE WAS A REAL PUSH TO TRY AND FIND A SOLUTION TO OUR WORLD AND TO US AS HUMAN BEINGS AND AS INDIVIDUALS. SO IT WAS KIND OF AN IDENTITY CRISIS, A LOT OF PEOPLE WENT THROUGH IN THEIR OWN WAY BUT IT WAS VERY MUCH COLLECTIVE AS WELL. >> WHEN DID YOU FIRST LEARN ABOUT TRANSINDENTAL MEDITATION? >> THAT'S A GOOD QUESTION. I FIRST LEARNED ABOUT IT FROM A FRIEND OF MY BROTHERS. WHO HAD BEEN TO INDIA. IN FACT, HE TOOK HIS -- HE LIVED IN THE SAME NEIGHBORHOOD AS WE DID IN LOS ANGELES AND SO HE TOOK ALL OF HIS COLLEGE MONEY, SOMEHOW GOT HOLD OF IT, AND WENT OFF TO INDIA. AND HE WAS FIRST WITH A WOMAN WHO WAS CONSIDERED A GREAT SAINT OF THE 20th CENTURY NAMED ANANDA AND THEN HE SPENT SIX MONTHS WITH HER AND SHE SAID YOU SHOULD GO STUDY UNDER THIS PARTICULAR GREAT YOGI, HE'S REALLY FOR THE WEST. HE UNDERSTANDS THE WESTERN MIND. SO HE WENT THERE AND HE HAD JUST COME BACK AND THAT'S WHEN I MET HIM AND HE WAS TELLING ME ABOUT MEDITATION. BUT I HAD -- WHEN I WAS 15 MY FATHER DIED. AND I HAD MY FIRST VERY PROFOUND SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE. SO I WAS LOOKING FOR DEEPER MEANING TO LIFE IN A SPIRITUAL WAY. AND I HAD READ SID HARTHA AND I FELT THAT THE REAL ANSWERS WERE INSIDE. I WAS LOOKING FOR MEDITATION WHEN HE CAME ALONG. THE SIMPLICITY THAT HE DESCRIBED IN THE MEDITATION HE DESCRIBED BECAUSE I HAD BEEN DOING ALL DIFFERENT KINDS OF MEDITATION AND READING ABOUT THEM, THE SIMPLICITY THAT WHERE HE SAID DEEP INSIDE OF ALL OF US IS PART OF THE MIND THAT WE CAN TAP INTO. IT'S SILENT, IT'S PEACEFUL, IT'S CREATIVE. AND IT BRINGS JOY AND PEACE TO THE WHOLE BEING. WE CAN TAP INTO THAT VERY EASILY AND BRING IT INTO OUR LIFE. SO WHEN I HEARD HIM SAY THAT, ON SOME VERY OBVIOUS LEVEL TO ME, I FOUND MYSELF SAYING THIS IS IT. THIS IS WHAT I HAVE BEEN LOOKING FOR. BECAUSE IT WAS SO SIMPLE AND DIRECT. AND THAT'S ALL I WANTED. I DIDN'T -- I DIDN'T REALLY WANT TO DO THE PRACTICE OF MEDITATION, I WANTED TO GET WHAT MEDICATION COULD GIVE YOU AND THIS SEEMED TO BE A VERY DIRECT WAY. TO GET IT. >> WHAT IS TRAININGSINDENTAL MEDITATION? >> THAT COMES OUT OF THE THE YOGA TRADITION. THE YOGA TRADITION IN INDIA IS VERY, VERY OLD. WE DON'T KNOW HOW OLD IT IS BECAUSE THEY HAVE IN HARAPA WHICH WAS 2700 BC, A SALE OF SOMEBODY SITTING IN THE FULL LOTUS, OBVIOUSLY MED MEDITATING. SO WE DON'T KNOW HOW OLD IT IS, BUT IT'S A TRADITION OF SELF-IMPROVEMENT, OF MAKING -- DEVELOPING YOUR POTENTIAL FROM THE INSIDE OUT. DEEPENING THE MIND. CONNECTING WITH THE DEEPEST PART OF THE MIND SO THAT YOU CAN STABILIZE IT AND BRING THAT INFLUENCE INTO YOUR LIFE BECAUSE OF THE MIND LIKE THE ROOTS OF THE TREE, IT AFFECTS EVERYTHING. SO IF YOU CAN STABILIZE THAT, AND DEEPEN IT, YOU'RE LESS VULNERABLE, YOU'RE MORE -- YOU'RE FEELING MORE CONNECTED, MORE CENTERED AND THAT ALLOWS YOU TO BE STRONGER. AND IT AFFECTS ALL -- EVERYTHING RELATIONSHIPS, ACHIEVEMENTS, ALL OF THAT. >> HOW DO YOU DO THAT? HOW DO YOU MEDITATE? >> GOOD QUESTION TOO. IT WAS ALWAYS TAUGHT. SO YOU DON'T -- IT'S LIKE A MARSHALL ART. YOU DON'T -- YOU CAN'T GET IT FROM READING A BOOK. YOU HAVE TO BE INSTRUCTED. AND THAT'S WHAT I -- WHEN I WENT TO INDIA, I HAD BEEN INSTRUCTED AT UCLA, THEY HAD A COURSE IN 1966, SUMMER OF '66 THAT I TOOK. AND I'VE FOUND THAT IT WAS IN FACT WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR. AND THE NEXT STEP WAS TO STUDY WITH THE PERSON WHO BROUGHT THIS OUT. HE KNEW ALL ABOUT IT. HE KNEW WHAT WE WERE TAPPING INTO, WHAT THE LONG TERM RESULTS -- JUST THE WHOLE GAMUT. SO I WANTED TO STUDY WITH HIM. AND WENT TO INDIA AS A RESULT OF THAT. YOU HAVE TO BE TAUGHT BECAUSE IT'S SOMETHING YOU DO. SO YOU'RE GUIDED. IT'S VERY SIMPLE BECAUSE THE MIND ITSELF IT'S NATURE IS TO ALWAYS MOVE TOWARDS MORE AND WHEN IT'S POINTED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION INWARD IT WILL MOVE IN THAT DIRECTION. AND IT WILL FIND THAT PART OF ITSELF THAT'S SILENT. AND THAT'S SORT OF ITS FOUNDATION. ONCE YOU TAP INTO THAT YOU REALIZE THAT WHAT WE HAVE BEEN CALLING OUR MIND, BUSY, OUR EMOTIONS OUR PERCEPTIONS, ALL OF THAT, IT'S LACKING A FOUNDATION. AND THAT WHEN YOU CAN BRING THE FOUNDATION IN, IT BALANCES IT. IT HELPS THAT BUSY MIND HAVE A GRAVITAS TO IT SO IT'S MORE STABLE, IT'S DEEPER AND LESS REACTIVE. AND SO IT'S VERY IMPORTANT PART OF THE MIND WE'RE NEGLECTING AND MAYBE WE JUST HAVEN'T HAD A WAY TO GET TO IT BUT NOW THAT THIS TECHNIQUE IS AVAILABLE WE CAN ALL GET TO IT. IT'S NECESSARY. AND ONCE YOU FIND THAT PART OF YOUR MIND AND GET ACCESS TO IT, IT'S REMARKABLE HOW IT WILL AFFECT EVERYTHING ELSE BECAUSE THE MIND PLAYS SUCH A CENTRAL ROLE IN OUR DECISIONS, IN OUR REACTIONS AND/EVEN THE GOALS WE SET OR SEE. SO IT'S VERY, VERY IMPORTANT. IT'S JUST BEEN LACKING. IT'S SORT OF LIKE SOMEBODY BEING MADE WISE. WISE PEOPLE HAVE MORE FOR SIGHT, THEY DON'T RUN -- REACT TO EVERYTHING. THAT'S WHAT DEEPENING YOUR MIND AND STABILIZING IT CONNECTING IT WITH ITS OWN FOUNDATION DOES. WE CALL THAT FOUNDATION OURSELVES, WE CALL IT OURSELF, OUR CENTER, BUT IT'S TOO ABSTRACT FOR US AT THIS POINT. WE CAN GET IT. IF WE GET IT, WE WILL BECOME BETTER STRONGER PEOPLE AND MORE ABLE TO EMBRACE THE DIFFERENCES AROUND US BECAUSE QUITE FRANKLY OUR WORLD WILL CONTINUE TO GET SMALLER BUT ALSO GROW. WE'RE GOING TO HAVE TO ACCEPT DIFFERENCE THAT PEOPLE ARE GOING TO BE DIFFERENT FROM US. AND IT'S NOT A BAD THING, IT'S ACTUALLY A GOOD THING. IN ORDER TO DO THAT YOU CAN'T BE THREATENED. THIS IS ABOUT MAKING IT SO YOU'RE STRONG ENOUGH TO BE ABLE TO SEE A DIFFERENCE AND IT WON'T THREATEN YOU. >> WITNESS YOU START MEDITATING, HOW LONG DOES IT TAKE A PERSON WHO HAS NEVER DONE THAT -- TO START SEEING AFFECTS OR START FEELING DIFFERENTLY? >> RIGHT AWAY. >> RIGHT AWAY. >> WHAT YOU DO IS YOU TAP INTO THAT DEEPEST PART OF YOUR MIND. IF YOU LOOK AT THE MIND LIKE A BODY OF WATER, LIKE THE GULF OF MEEK CO-, LARGE, THE SURFACE IS ACTIVE. BUT AS YOU GO DEEPER IT BECOMES LESS ACTIVE AND THE FOUNDATION CAN BE VERY STILL. SO IF YOU THINK OF THE MIND THERE, WHAT YOU DO WHEN YOU TRANSCEND WHICH IS A WORD THAT DOESN'T MEAN MUCH TO MOST OF US, IT DIDN'T TO ME, I DIDN'T KNOW WHAT THEY WERE TALKING ABOUT, BUT IT MEANS YOU GO DEEP INSIDE AND SORT OF PUT AN ANCHOR THERE AT THAT DEEPEST PART, THAT SILENT FOUNDATION. AND THEN YOU CONTINUE TO MOVE BETWEEN THE TWO. SO RIGHT NOW WE'RE RELEGATED TO THE SURFACE PART OF THE MIND. THAT'S ALL WE KNOW. BUT THERE'S THIS OTHER PART. ONCE YOU FIND IT, THEN YOU MOVE BETWEEN THE TWO, WHEN YOU'RE TRANSCENDING YOU GO TO THAT DEEPEST PART YOU COME OUT, YOU GO TO THAT DEEPEST PART, YOU COME OUT. AND WHAT THAT DOES IS IT STARTS TO DEVELOP A RELATIONSHIP FOR THE MIND WHERE IT STARTS TO IDE PHI OR WORK FROM OR COME FROM THAT DEEPER PART THAT SILENT PART. SO THAT THAT'S ITS PLACE OF OPERATION RATHER THAN BUSY CONSTANTLY CHANGING REACTION TO THIS, THAT KIND OF MIND. SO THE OTHERS STILL THERE BUT THE PART OF YOU THAT CAN GO BETWEEN THE TWO STARTS TO OPERATE FROM ITS BASE RATHER THAN FROM THE OTHER. THAT GIVES YOU MORE CONTROL OVER THE OTHER MEANING THAT YOU CAN DECIDE IF YOU'RE GOING TO REACT THAT WAY OR NOT. BECAUSE YOU'RE COMING FROM A SILENT PLACE RATHER THAN FROM A BUSY PLACE. YOU ALSO HAVE -- HOW YOU DEFINE YOURSELF CHANGES. YOU START TO SEE YOURSELF AS A HEALTHIER PERSON RATHER THAN A CONSTANT CHANGING EMOTIONAL. THAT'S YOUR STRESSES A LOT OF THE TIME WHEREAS YOU HAVE THIS SENSE OF BEING CENTERED IN YOURSELF, OPERATING FROM THE ZONE, THAT KIND OF THING STARTS TO HAPPEN FROM -- FOR YOU. IT JUST HAPPENS NATURALLY BY ASSOCIATING WITH THAT DEEPER PART OF THE MIND. >> TELL ME WHAT IT WAS LIKE STUDYING IN INDIA AND OBVIOUSLY THE BEATLES WERE THERE, WHAT'S THAT EXPERIENCE? >> IT WAS EXTRAORDINARY. BACK THEN INDIA WAS VERY FAR AWAY. YOU DIDN'T HAVE COMPUTERS AND EVEN TELEPHONES DIDN'T REALLY WORK. SO LEAVING MY WORLD AND GOING THERE IT WAS SO EXOTIC. PEOPLE WERE RIDING CAMELS IN THE STREET AND ELEPHANTS AND THEY ALL DRESSED DIFFERENTLY. THEY WERE IN THESE LONG BEAUTIFUL LONG SARIs AND WHAT THEY CALL PAJAMAS, THAT'S WHERE WE GOT THE WORD PA JAMA FROM. MOST WERE NOT DRESSED IN WESTERN CLOTHES. THE MOST PROFOUND WAS WHEN I GOT OFF THE PLANE THE SENSE OF TIME, I NEVER KNEW THAT TIME COULD BE RELATIVE UNTIL THAT MOMENT. TIME WAS DIFFERENT THERE. THEY WERE STILL -- THOUGH I WAS IN THE CITY, THEY WERE STILL PRIMARILY IN AGRICULTURAL COUNTRY. SO EVEN IF THE CITIES YOU HAD COWS, YOU HAD GOATS, YOU HAD CHICKENS, YOU HAD EVERYTHING, PIGS, EVERYTHING, BUT BUT THE SENSE OF TIME WAS VERY, VERY DIFFERENT. NOBODY RAN BY THE CLOCK. YOU WOULD NEVER SAY SOMETHING TO SOMEBODY LIKE MEET ME AT 12:10. THEY WOULDN'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT. YOU MIGHT SAY WHEN THE SUN STARTS TO GO DOWN, MAKES SENSE OF LIKE YOU GOT TO BE PLACE THAT DIDN'T WORK THERE. IT WAS LIKE LIKE SEEING TO THE MIDDLE AGES. IT REALLY BLEW MY MIND, AS THEY SAY. IT WAS AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE. WE HAVE TALKED ABOUT TRAVELING AFFECTING PEOPLE. BECAUSE YOU SEE DIFFERENT MENTALITIES AND WAYS OF LOOKING AT THE WORLD AND THINGS BUT THIS WAS LIKE NOTHING I HAD EVER SEEN BEFORE, IT WAS TOTALLY DIFFERENT. AND IT WAS QUITE AN EXPERIENCE, IT ALMOST FRIGHTENED ME. THEN WE WENT FROM THIS EXOTIC PLACE WHERE PEOPLE WERE RIDING CAMELS, TO -- AND HORSES WERE DRAWING THINGS, THERE WERE SOME CARS BUT THEY WERE NOT THE MAJOR THING. BUT THEN GOING IN TO THE JUNGLES IN INDIA, BECAUSE THE LAND WHERE THE COURSE WAS GIVEN WAS UP ON A HILL IN A JUNGLE RESERVE, THAT OVERLOOKED THE GHENGIS AS IT COMES OUT OF THE HIM LAYIAS, SPECTACULAR BUT IT WAS THE JUNGLE. SO IT WAS VERY -- IT WAS JUST THE EXPERIENCE WAS COMPLETELY LIFE CHANGING. >> WHAT WAS IT LIKE BEING WITH THE BEA, THELES AND DID YOU KNOW HE WAS GOING TO WRITE THE SONG ABOUT YOU? >> NO IDEA. SEE, I HAD BEEN AROUND FAMOUS PEOPLE BECAUSE MY FATHER MADE MOVIES WITH JOHN WAYNE AND THINGS. AND I -- ONE OF THE THINGS I HAD LEARNED WAS THAT IT WAS DISAPPOINTING FROM ME, WHEN I WAS SEVEN YEARS OLD MY MOTHER -- I WAS WILD ABOUT AN OPERA STAR AND SHE HAD ME SPEND MY 7TH BIRTHDAY WITH HIM AND HIS FAMILY. AND IT WAS -- HE WAS DRINKING ALL THE TIME AND HE WAS ANGRY AND IT WAS SUCH A DISAPPOINTMENT, I WAS SO SHOCKED. HERE IS THIS GUY SANG HEAVENLY, HIS VOICE. AND IN REAL LIFE HE WAS REALLY HORRIBLE, WHAT I THOUGHT WAS A HORRIBLE PERSON. IT JUST WENT DOWNHILL FROM THERE, MEETING FAMOUS PEOPLE. AND I DIDN'T WANT THE MEET THE BEATLES FOR THAT REASON. I JUST DIDN'T -- BECAUSE I ACTUALLY LIKED THEIR MUSIC, I LIKED WHAT THEY WERE SAYING. AND THEY WERE -- THE BEATLES WERE LIKE STEVE JOBS WAS FOR US, IF YOU REMEMBER WHEN HE WOULD COME OUT WITH A iPHONE, THE FIRST DIFFERENT -- >> iPOD, THINGS OF THAT NATURE. >> IT WAS AMAZING. IT WAS PHENOMENAL. WE WOULD BE SO EXCITED WHEN HE CAME WITH THE NEXT. THE BEATLES MUSIC WAS THAT LIKE THAT. WHEN THEIR MUSIC CAME OUT, IT WAS MAYBE A HUNDRED TIMES MORE THAN THAT. EVERYONE WAS GOING THROUGH THE SHAME COLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE HOE SAME COLLECTIVE EXPERIENCE AND THEIR MUSIC WAS THE VOICE TO THAT. SO WHEN THEY CAME OUT WITH AN ALBUM, WE ALL, EVERYBODY WOULD COME AND JUST SIT AROUND IT AND LISTEN. IT WAS VERY POWERFUL KIND OF THING. TO MEET THE BEATLES, I DIDN'T WANT TO MEET THEM. I DIDN'T WANT TO MEET PEOPLE WHO ARE FULL OF THEMSELVES. I HAD ENOUGH OF THAT. WHICH YOU MEET A LOT IN HOLLYWOOD. AND I WAS PLEASANTLY SURPRISED THEY WERE NOT LIKE THAT. >> THEY WEREN'T THAT WAY. >> THEY WERE ONE OF THE RARE PEOPLE THAT WERE NOT LIKE THAT. ALL OF THEM. AWFUL THEM WERE NOT LIKE THAT. THERE WAS ONE POINT WHERE MAURICE SAID TO THEM, WE'LL GIVE YOU YOUR OWN DINING AREA SO THAT YOU HAVE YOUR PRIVACY. AND THEY SAID NO, WE DON'T WANT THAT. WE WANT TO BE TREATED LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE. SO THEY WERE VERY DIFFERENT THAN MOST FAMOUS PEOPLE I MET. >> INTERESTING. WHEN DID YOU FIND OUT ABOUT THE SONG? >> I FOUND OUT ABOUT IT IN INDIA. IT WAS AT A LECTURE. AND MY GLASSES HAD BROKEN. IN INDIA SO I COULDN'T SEE. I NOW HAD -- I HAVE HAD SURGERY WHERE THE EYES -- CATARACTS. SO I CAN SEE NOW WITHOUT MY GLASSES. >> OKAY. >> BUT I WAS VERY NEARSIGHTED LIKE MINUS 950. REALLY NEARSIGHTED. SO I LEARNED TO FUNCTION WITHOUT GLASSES SOMEHOW OR OTHER, GIRLS THAT WEAR GLASSES NEVER GET PASSES KIND OF THING. SO I WOULD KIND OF FEEL MY WAY AND WE WERE AT THIS -- IN THE LECTURE HALL THERE WERE MAYBE 60 OF US AND THEY WERE LEAVING SUDDENLY. THAT'S -- I DON'T KNOW WHAT WAS GOING ON BUT THEY HAD TO LEAVE SUDDENLY. AND GEORGE WAS TRYING TO GET MY ATTENTION. SO HE WAS STANDING OVER THERE AND I WAS IN THE LECTURE HALL BUT I COULDN'T SEE. AND PEOPLE SAID GEORGE IS THERE, HE'S TRYING TO TELL YOU SOMETHING BUT I KNEW IF I LOOKED I WOULDN'T BE ABLE TO SEE SO I PRETENDED AS THOUGH I DIDN'T HEAR. AND THEN HE TOLD SOMEBODY TELL PRUDENCE THAT WE HAVE WRITTEN A SONG -- HE DIDN'T SAY IT WAS JOHN HE SAID WE HAVE WRITTEN A SONG FOR HER. WE WANTED TO SAY GOODBYE SO I GOT THAT MESSAGE THROUGH PEOPLE BUT I COULDN'T -- IF I HAD WALKED OVER I WOULD HAVE STUMBLED ON PEOPLE -- THAT'S HOW BAD MY EYES WERE, IT WAS HORRIBLE AND I DIDN'T WANT TO HAVE TO GO THROUGH THAT. SO I JUST PRETENDED AND IGNORED, THAT WAS ONE OF THE WAYS I DEALT WITH THINGS. LIKE A BOY SOMEBODY SAY THAT GUY IS LOOKING AT YOU, I COULDN'T SEE IF HE WAS LOOKING OR NOT, SO IGNORE. THAT WAS HOW I FOUND OUT. >> SPEAKING OF YOUR LIFE AND YOU MENTIONED IT MEETING FAMOUS PEOPLE GROWING UP IN HOLLYWOOD. I WANT TO PUT UP A COUPLE OF PICTURES AND HAVE YOU TALK BECAUSE YOUR BOOK TALKS ABOUT MUCH OF WHAT IT WAS LIKE GROWING UP IN HOLLYWOOD AND YOU MENTION JOHN WAYNE, I ENJOYED THE PART WHERE YOU TALK WHEN YOU FIRST MET JOHN WAYNE. TELL THAT REAL QUICK. >> JOHN WAYNE, IT WAS A MOVIE MY FATHER WAS MAKING, THEY HAVE ALL THESE SEATS FOR ALL N THE STARS AND THE DIRECTOR AND THERE WAS ONE BIG GIANT LEATHER WOOD SEAT MUCH TALLER THAN ANY OF THE OTHER SEATS. I GUESS JUST BY NATURE I WAS CURIOUS, I COULDN'T RESIST THIS, SO I WENT AND CLIMBED UP ON THIS BIG SEAT AND LOOKED OVER ALL THE OTHER SEATS. FACING THE STAGE. AS I SAT THERE JOHN WAYNE CAME UP BEHIND ME AND HE SAID WELL, PARTNER, SOMEBODY IS SITTING IN MY CHAIR. AND I TURNED AROUND AND HE WAS VERY TALL AND HE HAD THAT DEEP VOICE. AND IT WAS MY FIRST REAL EXPERIENCE OF MAN VERSUS WOMAN, IT WAS LIKE WHOA THERE IS SOMETHING TO BEING A MAN, VERY NICE. >> >> YOU LIKE THAT. >> I DID. HE LIFTEDDED ME UP AND -- LIFTED ME UP AND -- SO HE WAS A BIG HERO. BUT I SAW HIM YEARS LATER AND I WAS DISAPPOINTED BECAUSE HE UNFORTUNATELY HAD STARTED DRINKING A LOT/THINK. >> LET ME SHOW A COUPLE OF PICTURE, I THINK WE HAVE A PICTURE OF MOM AND DAD. >> THAT IS THEM WHEN THEY WERE VERY YOUNG. THERE ARE FEW PICTURES OF THEM THAT EARLY, THAT'S WHY I CHOSE THAT PICTURE. ONLINE YOU CAN FIND PICTURES OF THEM AFTER THEY'RE MARRIED BUT THIS WAS A VERY EARLY PICTURE, COULD HAVE BEEN RIGHT AFTER THEIR WEDDING OR SOMETHING BUT VERY EARLY PICTURE. >> YOUR DAD AS YOU SAID WAS A DIRECTOR. MOM WAS ACTRESS. >> FIRST GENERATION AMERICAN. SEW BOTH MY PARENTS CAME AND LEFT THEIR FAMILIES, NONE OF THEIR FAMILIES LEFT. MY MOTHER WAS FROM IRELAND AND HER FAMILY, NONE OF HER FAMILY LEFT SO ALL MY COUSINS ARE STILL THERE. SAME WITH MY FATHER HE'S FROM AUSTRALIA. HE LEFT HOME AT 15 AND FOUND HIS WAY TO HOLLYWOOD EVENTUALLY AND MADE HIS WAY INTO BECOMING A MOVIE DIRECTOR. >> I THINK WE MAY HAVE A COUPLE MORE OF YOUR HOME IN BEVERLY HILLS PERHAPS WITH YOUR SIBLINGS THAT WE WERE GOING TO SHOW REAL QUICK. OR MAYBE NOT. THERE WE GO. >> YES, THAT'S BY OUR SWIMMING POOL AND MY SISTER MIA IS IN THE CENTER, I'M WITH THE DARK HAIR WITH MY MOUTH OPEN. MY BROTHER JOHNNY ON THE SIDE OF ME, PATRICK, MY MOTHER GOING TO THE RIGHT. MY SISTER, THE BABY AND MICHAEL, THE OLDEST OF OUR SIBLINGS. HE WAS KILLED WHEN HE WAS 19 IN AN AIRPLANE CRASH. >> WE HAVE ABOUT THREE MINUTES LEFT. PRUDENCE, TELL ME WHAT IS ON YOUR AGENDA IN THE COMING YEARS. THERE IS YOUR FAMILY THERE. >> THERE'S MANY I FAMILY, YEAH. GRANDCHILDREN AND CHILDREN. THREE CHILDREN AND FOUR GRANDCHILDREN. I AM E PRETTY MUCH RETIRED DOWN IN NORTHWEST FLORIDA IN THE SEAGROVE BEACH SEASIDE AREA, 30A. AND I TEACH TM. I COME HERE SOMETIMES AND I MET A WONDERFUL GROUP OF PEOPLE. OVER THE YEARS I HAVE TAUGHT HERE AND SO I MAINLY NOW I WANT TO GIVE BACK. SO TEACHING TM I THINK IS SUCH A POWERFUL TECHNIQUE FOR ANY OF US AND IT'S A PART OF THE MIND WE NEGLECTED FOR WHATEVER REASONS, OUR CULTURE HASN'T GONE THERE BUT I THINK IT'S SOMETHING, IT'S TIMELY NOW, IT'S TIME. IT HELPS WITH STRESS IN AN AMAZING WAY. WHEN THE MIND BECOMES QUIET AND RESTED IN THE WAY IT DOES, THEN THE BODY FOLLOWS. SO WE GET TREMENDOUS RELIEF FROM STRESS WHICH IS A MAJOR PROBLEM FOR MOST OF US NOWADAYS. >> AND STRESS CAN CAUSE HEALTH PROBLEMS TO GO WITH IT. >> AND FAMILY PROBLEMS, DIVORCE AND WORLD PROBLEMS. SO WE NEED TO WORK ON OURSELVES A LITTLE BIT, WE HAVE GOT GREAT TECHNOLOGY BUT IT'S GOING TO DO US NO GOOD IF WE DON'T START WORKING ON OURSELVES. SO IT'S TIME AND I'M GOING TO DEVOTE THE REST OF MY LIFE TO THAT. >> IF PEOPLE WANT TO FOLLOW YOU AND LEARN WHAT YOU'RE DOING AND GET SOME INSIGHT ON TRANSENDENTAL MEDICATION, WHETHER WHERE DO THEY GO. >> TM.ORG. THEY CAN GET IN TOUCH WITH ME THROUGH THAT. I HAVE A WEBSITE WHICH IS PRUDENCEFARROW.COM. SO EITHER ONE, I WILL DIRECT THEM TO THE TM TEACHING BUT THE TM.ORG WILL CONNECT THEM WITH ME IN THIS AREA. >> PRUDENCE FARROW BRUNS, THE NAME OF HER BOOK IS "DEAR PRUDENCE, THE STORY BEHIND THE SONG". SHE INDEED SHE IS THAT PRUDENCE. THANK YOU VERY MUCH, PLEASURE TO TALK TO YOU. >> THANK YOU FOR LISTENING. >> YOU ARE SO WELCOME. BEST TO YOU. >> YOU TOO, THANK YOU. >> BY THE WAY YOU CAN SEE MORE OF OUR CONVERSATIONS ONLINE AT WSRE.ORG/CONVERSATIONS. YOU CAN ALSO FIND US ON YOUTUBE AND WE'RE ON FACEBOOK AND OF COURSE JUST FEEL FREE TO GOOGLE PRUDENCE AND YOU WILL FIND OUT ALL KINDS OF GREAT INFORMATION ABOUT HER AND WHAT SHE HAS DONE IN THE PAST AS WELL AS WHAT SHE'S GOING TO BE WORKING ON IN THE FUTURE AND ALSO LEARN ABOUT SOME MORE ABOUT THE TRANSINDENTAL MEDITATION WHICH IS VERY FASCINATING. GREAT CONVERSATION WE HAVE HAD HERE TODAY. I'M JEFF WEEKS, THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH FOR WATCHING. I HOPE YOU ENJOYED THE BROADCAST. TAKE A WONDERFUL CARE OF YOURSELF AND WE'LL SEE YOU SOON. ♪ >> SUPPORT FOR THIS PROGRAM IS PROVIDED IN PART BY GULF POWER, A SOUTHERN COMPANY. AND BY VIEWERS LIKE YOU. THANK YOU.

Contents

Early life

Farrow was born in Sydney, Australia, the son of Lucy Villiers (née Savage; 1881-1907), a dressmaker, and Joseph Farrow (1880-1925), a tailor's trimmer. His mother died when he was three years old. His parents were both of English descent.[2] Farrow was educated at Newtown Public School and Fort Street Boys' High School and then started a career in accountancy.

He claimed to have run away to sea in an American barquentine, sailed "all over the Pacific", and fought in revolts in Nicaragua and Mexico. Reaching California, he enrolled at St. Ignatius College (later known as the University of San Francisco) in 1923, but left after one month.[3]

He traveled throughout the Pacific, including Fiji, Hawaii and Guam.[4] On arrival in Hollywood, Farrow fabricated his education, saying he had attended Newington College in Sydney, Australia (he lived in a street below its ovals), Winchester College in England and the US Naval Academy. Many publications and websites still contain this information.[5]

Writer

Farrow started writing while working as a sailor and became interested in screenwriting after a chance voyage in the South Seas with the film-maker Robert J. Flaherty. Re-entering the United States, allegedly by jumping ship at San Francisco, he found his way to Hollywood where from 1927, his nautical expertise brought him work as a script consultant and technical adviser. He had already earned minor recognition as a poet and writer of short stories.

He soon established himself as a notable screenwriter.[6] He worked for DeMille Productions, doing titles for White Gold (1927) and The Wreck of the Hesperus (1927).[7]

He adapted Richard Connell's A Friend of Napoleon[8] but it does not appear to have been made. He also wrote the original story for The Blue Danube (1928) and the script for The Bride of the Colorado (1929). At Warner Bros he wrote A Sailor's Sweetheart (1927) for director Lloyd Bacon.

Paramount and RKO

At Paramount Farrow worked a series of "woman's pictures" Three Weekends (1928), with Clara Bow; The Woman from Moscow (1928) for Pola Negri; The First Kiss (1928), with Fay Wray and Gary Cooper, and Ladies of the Mob (1929) with Bow. At that studio he also made The Showdown (1928), The Four Feathers (1929), The Wheel of Life (1929), A Dangerous Woman (1929) and Wolf Song (1929) with Gary Cooper.

He wrote The Bad One (1930) for United Artists. Shadow of the Law (1930) and Seven Days' Leave (1930) (with Cooper) were for Paramount.

Farrow began to work increasingly at RKO: Inside the Lines (1930); The Common Law (1931), with Constance Bennett, and a big hit; A Woman of Experience (1931) with Helen Twelvetrees;

Britain

He compiled an English-French-Tahitian dictionary and wrote a novel, Laughter Ends (1933). In 1932 he went to England where he wrote The Impassive Footman (1932) for Basil Dean. He worked as a writer and assistant director on G. W. Pabst's film of Don Quixote, and briefly visited Tahiti again.[9]

Return to Hollywood and arrest

Farrow returned to Hollywood and re-established himself as a screenwriter. On 27 January 1933, while dancing at the Cocoanut Grove nightclub, he was arrested for breach of his visa, as part of a general crackdown against illegal immigrants in the film industry.[10] Farrow was charged with making a false statement while entering the US, having claimed he was Romanian.[11] Although threatened with deportation, eventually he was given five years' probation,[12] before being acquitted of the charges the following year.[13]

At MGM Farrow wrote Last of the Pagans (1935), partly set in Tahiti, and directed a short, The Spectacle Maker (1934). He received a plum appointment to work on Tarzan Escapes (1936) but the film was subsequently rewritten and reshot.[14]

Film director

Warner Bros

In 1930, it was announced that Farrow would direct his own story First Love but this did not materialize.[15] He signed to Warner Bros in 1936 looking to direct and was linked with a number of projects, including a foreign legion story and an adaptation of The Pit and the Pendulum.[16] Farrow finally made his directorial debut in 1937 with Men in Exile, a remake of Safe in Hell (1931).

Following this, he accompanied his wife to Europe, where she was making A Yank at Oxford (1938), lecturing on Father Damien, about whom Farrow had written a book (published in 1937), and receiving a Papal knighthood.[17]

On his return to Hollywood, Farrow resumed working as a B-picture director for Warners with West of Shanghai (1937) with Boris Karloff and She Loved a Fireman (1937) with Dick Foran and Ann Sheridan. He was reunited with Karloff in The Invisible Menace (1938) then made Little Miss Thoroughbred (1938) with John Litel and Sheridan, the first film for Peggy Ann Garner.[18]

Farrow followed this with Broadway Musketeers (1938) with Margaret Lindsay and Sheridan, a remake of Three on a Match, and My Bill (1938) with . Kay Francis, the first of Francis' B movies for Warners. He did some uncredited work on Comet Over Broadway (1938), starring Francis, when Busby Berkeley fell ill.

Farrow left his contract for a number of months, ostensibly to finish a book he was writing on the history of the papacy, and also due to disputes over the script for his next film, another starring Kay Francis, Women in the Wind.[19] He then re-emerged as a contract director for RKO.[20]

RKO

Farrow's tenure at RKO began well with the highly profitable The Saint Strikes Back (1939), the second in the "Saint" series and the first to star George Sanders in the lead. He followed it with Sorority House (1939), from a script by Dalton Trumbo and produced by Robert Sisk. RKO then announced Farrow would direct a film version of the director's book Damien the Leper produced by Sisk and starring Joseph Calleia[21] but it was never made. Instead he directedFive Came Back (1939), which, although a "B", became a surprise hit and received excellent reviews.

"I deliberately set out to become the damndest commercial director in the business," he said later. "The only way to get anywhere in Hollywood is to make money pictures. Then you can get some measure of respect and authority from the studio bosses, and little by little you get to do more of the things you want to do."[22]

Farrow went on to direct Full Confession (1939), with Victor McLaglen; Reno (1939); Married and in Love (1940); and A Bill of Divorcement (1940), a remake of the 1932 Katharine Hepburn film with Maureen O'Hara in the lead. All these films were produced by Sisk. Bill of Divorcement was Farrow's first "A" as director.

War service

Despite his flourishing career and recently having become a father for the first time, Farrow was keen to be involved in World War II. He went to Vancouver in November 1939 and enlisted in the Canadian Navy.[23] He went back to RKO to finish Bill of Divorcement then joined the navy. RKO promised to hold his job when he returned.[24]

Farrow was appointed lieutenant in March 1940 and assigned to Naval History and the Controller of Information Unit. He worked on anti-submarine patrols and in April 1941 was loaned to the Royal Navy and appointed to HMS Goshawk naval base in Trinidad, and served as assistant to the Senior British Naval Officer, Curaçao. He contracted typhus fever and returned to Naval Headquarters, Ottawa, in late 1941.[25]

It was announced he would direct a Canadian war film starring his wife Maureen O'Sullivan while on leave, but this did not eventuate.[26]

Farrow was invalided out of the Canadian Navy with typhus in January 1942 at the rank of Commander but remained in the naval reserve.[27] He was gravely ill when he returned but was nursed back to health by his wife. His illness meant he was unable to return to active service.[28]

Paramount

Farrow resumed his directing career at Paramount, whose then-head of production, Buddy de Sylva, had been impressed by Five Came Back and offered Farrow a contract.[29] For the first time, Farrow was directing nothing but "A" movies. The association began brilliantly with Wake Island (1942), which earned him an Oscar nomination for Best Director, and was one of the year's biggest hits.

Farrow followed it with another war film, Commandos Strike at Dawn (1942), which also proved popular. China (1943), with Alan Ladd and Loretta Young,was another big hit.[30]

In February 1943, Farrow signed a long term contract with Paramount. [31] In July 1943 he served as technical consultant for the proposed Royal Canadian Navy show.[4] He directed The Hitler Gang (1944); Two Years Before the Mast (filmed 1944, not released until 1946), with Ladd; and You Came Along (1945), from a script co-written by Ayn Rand.

In May 1945, Farrow was briefly recalled to active duty, travelling to Britain for work in connection with the Director of Special Services.[4][32] Shortly after he made Calcutta (1947) with Ladd, though it was not released until two years later, to strong box office.

Two Years Before the Mast was released in 1946 and became the tenth most popular movie of the year. In 1946 Farrow was reportedly writing a biography of Junipero Serra but it appears to have never been made.[33]

Ladd was meant to star in Farrow's California (1947) but dropped out over money and was replaced by Ray Milland. It was a big hit. Less popular were two films with Sonny Tufts: Blaze of Noon (1947), about flyers, and Easy Come, Easy Go (1947), with Barry Fitzgerald.

Farrow became an American citizen in July 1947.[34]

Film noir and westerns

In 1947, Farrow made one of his most highly regarded films, the noir The Big Clock (1948) with Ray Milland and O'Sullivan. He was reunited with Ladd for a military drama, Beyond Glory (1948), then returned to noir with Night Has a Thousand Eyes (1948), starring Edward G. Robinson from a Cornell Woolrich novel, and Alias Nick Beal (1949), with Milland.

As a change of pace he produced and directed a comedy with Betty Hutton, Red, Hot and Blue (1949), followed by a popular Western with Milland, Copper Canyon (1950). Farrow did some uncredited work on the Ladd Western, Red Mountain (1951), with William Dieterle fell ill. He also published a history of the papacy, Pageant of the Popes (1950).

For Howard Hughes at RKO he directed Robert Mitchum in a noir, Where Danger Lives (1950). Hughes liked Farrow's work enough to hire him again for His Kind of Woman (1951), also with Mitchum, although the film would be extensively re-shot by Richard Fleischer.

Back at Paramount he made Submarine Command (1951) with William Holden. He wound up his contract with a final movie with Ladd, Botany Bay (1952), a half-successful attempt to repeat Two Years to the Mast.

Freelancer

Farrow directed Robert Taylor and Ava Gardner in the MGM Western, Ride, Vaquero! (1953), which was a hit. He made two produced by John Wayne for Wayne's company, Batjac: Plunder of the Sun (1953), an adventure story with Glenn Ford, and Hondo (1953) with Wayne, from a story by Louis L'Amour; the latter especially was popular at the box office.

He made A Bullet Is Waiting (1954) at Columbia, then he had another big hit with Wayne, The Sea Chase (1955), where Wayne played a German sea captain in World War Two. The early part of the film was set in Sydney, Australia, although not filmed there.

Farrow was the original director of Around the World in 80 Days (1956) but was fired by producer Michael Todd shortly after filming commenced. However Farrow remained credited for his contribution to the screenplay, which won an Oscar in 1956.[35]

He also published a collection of poetry and a biography of Sir Thomas More.

RKO

Farrow signed a three-picture deal with RKO.[36] He only made two of them, neither successful: Back from Eternity (1956), a remake of Five Came Back, and The Unholy Wife (1957), a failed attempt to launch Diana Dors to US audiences.

Samuel Bronston

He received an offer from Samuel Bronston to make two films, a biography of John Paul Jones and a story of the life of Jesus Christ, which Farrow had been trying to make for years. He directed the first one - John Paul Jones. However he was replaced as director on the second by Nicholas Ray – it was released as King of Kings (1961).

Personal life

Farrow was a notorious playboy in his youth, being linked to Dolores del Río and Diana Churchill[37] among others.[38] He married Felice Lewin in 1924.

In 1934, he became engaged to actress Maureen O'Sullivan[39] and they married on 12 September 1936. Farrow and O'Sullivan had seven children: four daughters, who became actresses, Mia (born 1945), Prudence (born 1948), Stephanie (born 1949), Tisa (born 1951); and three sons, Michael Damien (1939–1958), Patrick Villiers (1942–2009), and John Charles (born 1946).[40] Maureen O'Sullivan was his second wife, after he converted to Catholicism and received an annulment of his first marriage.[41] Farrow often wrote about Catholic themes.[42]

Death

Farrow died in Beverly Hills, California on January 27, 1963 at the age of 58 and was buried in the Holy Cross Cemetery, Culver City.

Awards and honours

Australian connection

As one of the few high-profile Australians in Hollywood during the 1930s, Farrow's activities were well covered by the Australian media. He accepted the Oscar won by the Australian documentary Kokoda Front Line! (1943),[44] met Australian Senator Richard Keane, the Minister for Trade and Customs, when he visited Hollywood during the war[45] and offered to assist in the establishment of an Australian information service in the US.[46] He also often expressed a desire to make a film back in Australia[47] and later made two films with Australian connections, Botany Bay (1953) and The Sea Chase (1955), despite having ceased to be a British subject in 1947 and thus never acquired Australian citizenship when it was created in 1949.

In 1927 he was described as an Australian member of Hollywood, along with May Robson, the New Zealander Rupert Julian, Josephine Norman and E.O. Gurney.[48]

Filmography

Writer only

Director

Screenplays for unrealized films

  • A Friend of Napoleon (1927) – adapted from story by Richard Connell for director William K Howard and produced Cecil B de Mille[64]
  • Father Damien (1939), adapted from Farrow's book Damien the Leper (1937)[65][66]

Books

  • The Bad Ones (1930) – novel
  • Laughter Ends (1933) – novel
  • Damien the Leper (1937) – biography of Father Damien[67]
  • The Royal Canadian Navy 1908–1940 (1940) – history
  • Pageant of the Popes (1950) – history of the papacy[68]
  • Seven Poems in Pattern (1955) – collection of poetry
  • Story of Sir Thomas More (1956) – biography of Thomas More

Play

  • A Registered Woman (1931)

References

  1. ^ According to the State of California. California Death Index, 1940–1997. Center for Health Statistics, California Department of Health Services, Sacramento, California. Searchable at http://www.familytreelegends.com/records/caldeaths
  2. ^ "Mia Farrow's Interactive Family Tree". PBS. 9 March 2016. Retrieved 16 June 2016.
  3. ^ Hazlehurst, Cameron (2006). "Farrow, John Villiers (1904–1963)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Retrieved 15 October 2010.
  4. ^ a b c John Farrow: "Commander Hollywood", CFB Esquimalt Naval & Military Museum Archived 8 February 2012 at the Wayback Machine.
  5. ^ Profile, Tcm.com; retrieved 3 May 2014.
  6. ^ "MOTION PICTURE STARS". Portland Guardian. Vic.: National Library of Australia. 20 September 1928. p. 5 Edition: EVENING. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  7. ^ Kingsley, G. (1927, Jun 03). NEW TWIN LAUGH-PAGERS. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/162067891?accountid=13902
  8. ^ French actress has major role in gish picture. (1927, Feb 27). Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/162029030?accountid=13902
  9. ^ "Letter from London". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 17 December 1932. p. 9. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  10. ^ "AUSTRALIAN ARRESTED IN FILM RAID". The Mail. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 28 January 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  11. ^ "GENERAL CABLE NEWS". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 10 February 1933. p. 10. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  12. ^ "U.S.A. IMMIGRATION". The Mercury. Hobart, Tas.: National Library of Australia. 29 March 1933. p. 8. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  13. ^ "U.S.A. IMMIGRATION". The Mercury. Hobart, Tas.: National Library of Australia. 11 January 1934. p. 8. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
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  21. ^ Special to THE NEW,YORK TIMES. (1939, May 17). 'DAMIEN THE LEPER' PURCHASED BY RKO. New York Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/102931063?accountid=13902
  22. ^ Thomas F. Brady, "ALARUM IN HOLLYWOOD: Varied Viewpoints STUDIO JOTTINGS FROM HOLLYWOOD Questioned by the Code Title Furor Cinecolor Up", New York Times (1923-Current file) [New York, N.Y] 13 October 1946: p. 65
  23. ^ "War News In Brief". The Advertiser. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 8 November 1939. p. 20. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  24. ^ Schallert, E. (1940, Mar 25). 'Baron of colorados' now robinson feature. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165024828?accountid=13902
  25. ^ "GENERAL CABLE NEWS". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 22 March 1940. p. 8. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  26. ^ "Hollywood has its patriots..." The Australian Women's Weekly. National Library of Australia. 5 October 1940. p. 21 Section: The Movie World. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  27. ^ "FILMS YOU'LL BE SEEING SOON". The Mail. Adelaide: National Library of Australia. 29 May 1943. p. 12. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  28. ^ By, L. O. (1943, Jan 31). Farrow puts his experience into pictures. The Washington Post (1923-1954) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/151664139?accountid=13902
  29. ^ Schallert, E. (1942, Feb 09). DRAMA. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165314488?accountid=13902
  30. ^ "Town Called Hollywood" Scheuer, Philip K. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) 08 Nov 1942: C3.
  31. ^ DRAMA: 'Outlaw' Stars to Tour; 'Army' Eligibles Named Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) [Los Angeles, Calif] 06 Feb 1943: A7.
  32. ^ "Hollywood's New Romantic Team". Sunday Times. Perth: National Library of Australia. 6 May 1945. p. 4 Section: The Sunday Times COMICS. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  33. ^ John farrow to pen life of padre serra. (1946, Apr 14). Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/165676503?accountid=13902
  34. ^ "JOHN FARROW NOW U.S. CITIZEN". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 14 July 1947. p. 3. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  35. ^ "Around the World in 80 Days notes". Turner Classic Movies.
  36. ^ Scheuer, P. K. (1956, Jan 03). Drama. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/166898306?accountid=13902
  37. ^ "Secret Marriage Denial". The Barrier Miner. Broken Hill, NSW: National Library of Australia. 25 October 1932. p. 1. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  38. ^ "SCREEN SHORTS". Western Mail. Perth: National Library of Australia. 27 November 1930. p. 4. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  39. ^ "AUSTRALIAN SCENARIO WRITER". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 27 September 1934. p. 11 Supplement: Women's Supplement. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  40. ^ "California Births 1905–1995". Familytreelegends.com. Retrieved 2016-06-16.
  41. ^ "GENERAL CABLE NEWS". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 7 September 1936. p. 12. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  42. ^ THRAPP, D. L. (1956, Apr 29). Film man's life is epic of sea, faith. Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/166928355?accountid=13902
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  44. ^ "Flag dipped to honor film servicemen". The Australian Women's Weekly. National Library of Australia. 20 March 1943. p. 19. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  45. ^ "MINISTER'S U.S.A. VISIT EMPHASISED AUSTRALIA'S LACK OF REPRESENTATION". Townsville Daily Bulletin. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 22 January 1945. p. 2. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
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  47. ^ "Kennedys Home From Hollywood". The Argus. Melbourne: National Library of Australia. 8 August 1944. p. 8. Retrieved 3 March 2012.
  48. ^ "BRAINS ENHANCES HER PULCHRITUDE: BEAUTIFUL AUSTRALIAN GIRL ARRIVES Antipodean Prize Winner Comes to Woo Fame as Picture Actress" Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) 14 June 1927: A8.
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  63. ^ LEAD IN FOX FILM TO LINDA DARNELL: Actress Is Named by Studio to Role in 'The Guy Who Sank the Navy,' Football Story Marton to Direct "Pedley" By THOMAS F. BRADY Special to THE NEW YORK TIMES.. New York Times (1923-Current file) [New York, N.Y] 26 Oct 1950: 38.
  64. ^ "French Actress Has Major Role in Gish Picture" Los Angeles Times (1923-Current File) 27 Feb 1927: C11.
  65. ^ "'Damien the Leper' Purchased by RKO; Robert Sisk to Be the Producer — Joseph Calleia Has Been Assigned to Title Role". The New York Times. May 17, 1939. Retrieved 2015-11-27.
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  67. ^ Farrow, John (1937). Damien the Leper. Camden, N.J.: Sheed and Ward. OCLC 8018072.
  68. ^ "PAGEANT OF THE POPES", by John Farrow. Sheed & Ward. 394 pp. $4.50. The Washington Post (1923-1954) [Washington, D.C] 12 Mar 1950: B6.

External links

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