To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

January 2023 Speaker of the United States House of Representatives election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

January 2023 Speaker of the United States
House of Representatives election

← 2021 January 3–7, 2023 October 2023 →

Needed to win: Majority of votes cast
First ballot: 434 votes cast, 218 needed for a majority
Fifteenth ballot: 428 votes cast, 215 needed for a majority
  Majority party Minority party
 
Candidate Kevin McCarthy Hakeem Jeffries
Party Republican Democratic
Leader's seat California 20th New York 8th
First ballot 203 (46.8%) 212 (48.8%)
Final ballot 216 (50.5%) 212 (49.5%)

  Third party
 
Candidate Andy Biggs Others
Party Republican
Leader's seat Arizona 5th
First ballot 10 (2.3%) 9 (2.1%)
Final ballot withdrawn

Speaker before election

Nancy Pelosi
Democratic

Elected Speaker

Kevin McCarthy
Republican

At the opening of the 118th United States Congress, the members-elect of the House of Representatives elected in the 2022 midterms held an election for its speaker, marking the 128th speaker election since the office was created in 1789.[1][2] It began on January 3, 2023, and concluded in the early morning hours of January 7 when Kevin McCarthy of California, leader of the House Republican Conference, won a majority of votes cast on the fifteenth ballot.[3] After the longest speaker election since December 1859 – February 1860, McCarthy won the speakership by making concessions to Republican Party hardliners,[4][5] who had refused to support him through several rounds of voting, finding him too weak and untrustworthy.[6][7]

Republicans won a narrow majority of House seats over the Democratic Party in the 2022 elections. McCarthy won the nomination within the Republican conference but faced public opposition from far-right House Republicans before the vote.[8][9][10] The opposition consisted mainly of members of the Freedom Caucus.[11] With 19 Republicans voting for candidates other than McCarthy on the first ballot, no candidate achieved a majority and the election proceeded to additional ballots for the first time since 1923.[12] In the first round of voting, House Democratic Caucus leader Hakeem Jeffries of New York received 212 votes, McCarthy received 203 votes, and Andy Biggs of Arizona received 10 votes; other candidates who were not formally nominated received 9 votes.[13]

On the second through the fourteenth votes, McCarthy again failed to receive a majority of votes cast. Jeffries received the support of all Democrats present on each ballot.[14] Most or all of the Republican opposition voted for Jim Jordan of Ohio on the second and third rounds and Byron Donalds of Florida on the fourth through eleventh rounds.[15] Kevin Hern of Oklahoma and former president Donald Trump were also nominated and received votes in various rounds. On the fourth day of voting, January 6, many of the Republicans who opposed McCarthy began voting for him following negotiations between rounds. On the fifteenth and final ballot, the six remaining anti-McCarthy holdouts voted "present", which reduced the threshold of votes needed for a majority from 218 to 215, thus allowing McCarthy to be elected with 216 votes.[3]

Process and conventions

As the clerk of the House, Cheryl Johnson oversaw the 2023 election of a speaker as the acting presiding officer.

The speaker is the presiding officer of the U.S. House of Representatives. The House elects its speaker at the beginning of a new Congress (i.e. biennially, after Election Day) or when a speaker dies, resigns, or is removed from the position intra-term. Since 1839, the House has elected speakers by roll call vote.[16] Following a congressional election and the adjournment of the prior congress, there being no speaker, the House clerk summons, convenes, and calls the House to order. After prayer offered by the House chaplain, the clerk leads the representatives in the Pledge of Allegiance before ordering a roll call conducted by the reading clerk. The clerk and its officers then order and oversee the election of a speaker. During these processes, the clerk must "preserve order and decorum and decide all questions of order", which is subject to appeal to the body.[17]

Traditionally, each of the party caucuses and conferences selects a candidate for the speakership from among its senior leaders prior to the roll call. Representatives are not restricted to voting for the candidate nominated by their party but generally do, as the outcome of the election effectively determines which one is the majority party and consequently will organize the House.[18] Without a speaker, members-elect of the House cannot be sworn in.[a] The House is unable to conduct any business other than electing the speaker.[19][20] Because the rules of the House are adopted for each new Congress, the House will not have rules until the election is complete allowing the members to be sworn in and the House to adopt rules.[21]

Representatives that choose to vote for someone other than their party's nominated candidate usually vote for another member within the party or vote present, which entails abstention. Moreover, as the Constitution does not explicitly state that the speaker must be an incumbent member of the House, it is permissible for representatives to nominate and vote for someone who is not a member of the House at the time, and non-members have been nominated and received a few votes in various speaker elections over the past several years.[22] Nevertheless, every person elected speaker has been a member.[18] Upon winning election, the new speaker is immediately sworn in by the House dean, the chamber's longest-serving member.[23][24] The new speaker then administers the oath en masse to the rest of the members of the House.[25]

To be elected speaker, a candidate must receive a majority of the current votes cast, as opposed to a majority of the entire membership of the House—at the time 218 votes, in a House of 434 members, due to one vacancy caused by the death of Donald McEachin of Virginia.[26] There have only been a few instances during the past century where a person received a majority of the votes cast and thus won the election while failing to obtain a majority of the full membership. It had happened most recently in 2021, when Nancy Pelosi was elected with 216 votes (as opposed to 218). Such a variation in the number of votes necessary to win a given election might arise due to vacancies, absentees, or members being present but not voting. If no candidate wins a majority of the votes cast for a person by name, then the roll call is repeated until a speaker is elected.[18] The most recent multi-ballot election prior to the January 2023 contest occurred in December 1923, when a closely divided House needed nine ballots to elect Frederick H. Gillett speaker.[27]

Democratic nomination

Nancy Pelosi of California, the outgoing speaker, retired from the position and announced her support for Hakeem Jeffries of New York.

During the run-up to the 2019 speaker election, Nancy Pelosi, who had been the Democratic Caucus' leader and nominee in every speaker election since 2003,[28] struck a deal with several caucus members in which she promised that she would retire from the position of speaker after the 2022 congressional elections in exchange for those members' votes in that speakership election, which she saw as necessary in order for her to win a majority.[29] By early 2022, Congressman Hakeem Jeffries of New York was viewed as the top prospect to succeed Pelosi if she were to retire as the leader of the Democratic Caucus.[30] However, ahead of the 2022 election Pelosi refused to confirm whether she intended to honor her pledge to serve no further terms as leader.[31] On November 17, 2022, the same day that news outlets projected that Democrats had failed to defend their House majority in the midterm elections,[32] Pelosi delivered a speech on the House floor in which she announced that she would not run again for a leadership position.[33] The following day, Jeffries distributed a letter to House Democratic Caucus members declaring his intent to run to succeed Pelosi.[34] No opponent challenged Jeffries, and on November 30 the Democratic Caucus voted to make Jeffries its leader during the 118th Congress and its nominee for the speakership election.[35] Jeffries is the first black person ever nominated for House speaker.[36]

Candidates

Nominee

Declined to run

Result

On November 30, Jeffries was selected by acclamation.[41]

Candidate Votes Percent
Hakeem Jeffries Green tickY 100%

Republican nomination

On November 15, 2022, in a secret ballot the House Republican Conference voted to retain Kevin McCarthy as its leader and nominee for the House speakership. However, McCarthy did not receive the votes of 218 members of the conference, the support needed to have a majority of all House members that would be in office at the start of the 118th Congress.[42]

As Republican Conference leader, McCarthy had been the Republican Conference's nominee for the speakership in both the 2019 and 2021 speaker elections in which Democratic majorities elected Nancy Pelosi as speaker.[43] However, McCarthy's first pursuit of the House speakership had been the October 2015 speaker election, which was held after John Boehner resigned under pressure from conservative hardliners and the Freedom Caucus,[10][44] Kevin McCarthy sought the Republican nomination and was initially judged as the party's preferred candidate.[45] After the House Freedom Caucus refused to vote for McCarthy in a floor vote for the speakership, it became evident that McCarthy had not secured the support of a congressional majority that would be needed to elect him speaker.[46][47] As a result, McCarthy withdrew from the race, and Paul Ryan was elected speaker.[48][49] Ryan did not seek reelection to the House during the 2018 elections. After the elections, in which Republicans lost their House majority to the Democrats, the Republican Conference elected McCarthy to serve as their leader in the next congress.[50][51] During the 116th Congress and 117th which followed, McCarthy was the House minority leader.

Candidates

Nominee

Lost nomination

Results

The House Republican Conference vote was held on November 15, 2022, and despite a challenge from Biggs, McCarthy won the majority of votes, becoming the Republican nominee for speaker of the House. As McCarthy won less than 218 votes, a majority of the seats in the House, the media started questioning his ability to be voted in as Speaker.[54][55][56]

Candidate Votes Percent
Kevin McCarthy Green tickY 188 85.8%
Andy Biggs 31 14.2%

Election of the speaker

Background

The election for speaker began on January 3, 2023, at the start of the 118th Congress. At the time of the proceedings, there was one vacant seat, Virginia's 4th district.[26][57]

Andy Biggs of Arizona was nominated on the first ballot as part of the right-wing opposition to Kevin McCarthy of California.

In anticipation of right-wing opposition to McCarthy's election as speaker, Don Bacon of Nebraska threatened to form a coalition of moderate Republicans who would work with the Democrats to successfully install a speaker.[58] Several names were floated as a potential compromise candidate, the most prominent of which was Fred Upton, a moderate Republican who had been the representative for Michigan's 6th congressional district up to his retirement in the 2022 election cycle.[59] McCarthy and his supporters spent December and the first days of January negotiating with right-wing opponents of McCarthy to persuade them to support him on the floor. At a closed-door meeting shortly before the speaker vote on January 3, Mike Rogers of Alabama threatened dissident Republicans with removal from House committees.[60]

Prior to the vote, Politico reported that at least five Republican representatives had refused to support McCarthy, while another nine had not publicly commented on whether they would. As the Republican Party won a slim majority (222–212) and assuming Democratic members would not vote for him, McCarthy could only sustain as many as four Republican members voting for other candidates or nine Republican members either voting present or not voting at all, for McCarthy to be elected as speaker.[61][62] Bob Good of Virginia said that McCarthy "has not done anything to earn my vote", explaining that "[t]here's many times where we ... asked him to fight on various opportunities and various issues, and I have not seen the demonstrated fight that we're looking for."[63] The Club for Growth, a conservative political advocacy group, openly called for House Republicans to oppose his nomination.[64]

It was reported that these representatives demanded that McCarthy make concessions before they would support him, such as lowering the barriers for caucus members to force a vote to remove a sitting speaker and other procedural matters.[65] Chip Roy of Texas became a leader in the negotiation process for the holdouts to McCarthy's speakership nomination. The goals that Roy and a group of about 20 Republicans included to bring down the threshold for calling a vote of no confidence against the speaker to one member, more enforcement to allow more time to read bills, a greater role for the House Freedom Caucus in Republican leadership, requiring Republican leadership to refrain from being involved in primary elections,[66] and an end to U.S. aid to Ukraine.[67]

Candidates

The following individuals received at least one vote in the election for speaker or expressed interest in serving in the role.

Summary

On the first through the fourteenth votes, McCarthy failed to receive a majority of votes cast,[70] while Jeffries received the support of all Democrats present on each ballot.[71] Jim Jordan of Ohio received all votes of Republicans opposed to McCarthy on the second and third rounds.[72] Following three unsuccessful votes on January 3, the House adjourned until noon on January 4.[73] During the fourth vote, Roy nominated Byron Donalds of Florida, who replaced Jordan as the Republican alternative to McCarthy.[74] In the fourth ballot until the eleventh ballot, Victoria Spartz of Indiana voted present, lowering the necessary threshold to 217 votes.[75]

Following three more unsuccessful ballots on January 4, the House again adjourned until 8 pm the same day, then voted to adjourn again until noon on January 5.[76] The House reconvened on January 5, and from the seventh to the eleventh ballots no candidate achieved a majority of the vote, making this the longest speaker election since that of December 1859 – February 1860.[77] After initially voting to adjourn the proceedings until the following Monday, seconds before the voting to adjourn closed, McCarthy and his allies reversed their votes, which brought about a fifteenth ballot.[78] On this fifteenth and final ballot, McCarthy received 50.5% of the votes cast for a candidate by name, as all four members-elect who had voted for other candidates on the fourteenth ballot voted present instead. McCarthy was elected speaker, and the early morning of January 7 marked the end of one of the highest number of ballots needed to elect a House Speaker in U.S. history.[3][79][80]

In each round, Jeffries's received the unanimous vote of every present Democrat.[28] This marked the first speakership balloting since 2009 in which Democratic members voted unanimously for the House Democratic Caucuses' nominee.[81]

Ballots 1–3 (January 3)

On the first ballot, Elise Stefanik of New York gave a nominating speech for McCarthy, Pete Aguilar of California nominated Jeffries, and Paul Gosar of Arizona nominated Andy Biggs.[73][82] In total, 19 Republicans voted for candidates other than McCarthy, while Jeffries received the most votes of any candidate with all Democrats present voting in his favor.[83] Since no nominee received an outright majority of the vote, a second ballot took place for the first time since the December 1923 U.S. speaker election.[26][84]

On the second ballot, Jordan nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Matt Gaetz of Florida nominated Jordan. The same 19 Republicans voted against McCarthy, this time coalescing their votes around Jordan. No candidate received an outright majority of the vote.[72][85][86]

Jim Jordan of Ohio was nominated on the second and third ballots as anti-McCarthy Republicans coalesced their votes around him. He never voted for himself.

On the third ballot, Steve Scalise of Louisiana nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Roy nominated Jordan. Jordan again voted for McCarthy, not for himself.[73] Byron Donalds of Florida, who had voted for McCarthy on the first two ballots, instead voted for Jordan, increasing Jordan's vote total to 20.[87] Donalds wrote on Twitter about his decision to change his vote, stating that "the reality is Rep. Kevin McCarthy doesn't have the votes."[72][88]

After the third ballot, Tom Cole of Oklahoma moved to adjourn the meeting until 12:00 p.m. on January 4, and the motion was approved by voice vote.[73][89]

January 2023 election for speaker (1st through 3rd ballots)
Party Candidate 1st ballot 2nd ballot 3rd ballot
Votes % Votes % Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries (NY 8) 212 48.8% 212 48.8% 212 48.8%
Republican Kevin McCarthy (CA 20) 203 46.8% 203 46.8% 202 46.5%
Republican Jim Jordan (OH 4) 6 1.4% 19 4.4% 20 4.6%
Republican Andy Biggs (AZ 5) 10 2.3%
Republican Jim Banks (IN 3) 1 0.2%
Republican Byron Donalds (FL 19) 1 0.2%
Republican Lee Zeldin[b] 1 0.2%
Total votes 434 100% 434 100% 434 100%
Vacant 1 1 1
Votes needed to win 218 >50% 218 >50% 218 >50%

Ballots 4–6 (January 4)

Ahead of the fourth ballot of voting on January 4, former president Donald Trump reaffirmed his support for McCarthy to be speaker of the House and urged all House Republicans to vote for him.[90] Kat Cammack of Florida described those who did not vote for McCarthy as "the radical 2 percent".[91][92] Ralph Norman of South Carolina, one of the Republicans opposed to McCarthy, stated that McCarthy would win over additional votes from the Republican holdouts by committing to shutting down the U.S. government over raising the United States debt ceiling.[93]

Victoria Spartz of Indiana voted present on the fourth through eleventh ballot, switching her vote from McCarthy.

After a quorum call, Wisconsin Republican Mike Gallagher nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Roy nominated Byron Donalds.[75] Despite Trump's endorsement,[94] the 20 members who had voted for Jordan in the third ballot again opposed McCarthy, voting in this round for Donalds.[95] Victoria Spartz, who had voted for McCarthy on each previous ballot, voted present.[75] Spartz explained her vote of present as a message that more deliberations are needed.[96]

On the fifth ballot, Warren Davidson of Ohio nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Lauren Boebert of Colorado nominated Donalds.[76] All members voted for the same candidates on the fifth ballot as they did on the fourth.[97]

On the sixth ballot, Cammack nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Scott Perry of Pennsylvania nominated Donalds.[76] Prior to the ballot, Ken Buck of Colorado suggested to CNN that McCarthy should withdraw from consideration for Speaker if he could not reach a majority; he nonetheless voted again for McCarthy.[98] All members voted for the same candidates on the sixth ballot as they did on the fourth and fifth.[76]

Following the sixth ballot, Steve Scalise of Louisiana was seen as a possible alternative to McCarthy.

The House agreed to adjourn until 8:00 p.m. the same day by voice vote.[76] After reconvening at 8:00, the House agreed to adjourn again until 12:00 p.m. the next day, January 5,[99] by a vote of 216–214.[100] Of those who voted against adjournment, 210 were Democrats and four were Republicans: Biggs, Boebert, Gaetz, and Eli Crane of Arizona.[101] Following the sixth ballot, Politico reported that Donalds was unlikely to be the final choice of the anti-McCarthy Republicans, with the chair of the Republican Study Committee, Kevin Hern of Oklahoma, being floated as a potential candidate.[102] Pete Sessions of Texas also suggested that Republicans should begin to consider other speaker candidates,[103] with Scalise, the House Majority Leader-elect, being specifically named.[104]

Ahead of a seventh vote on the speakership, McCarthy offered several concessions, including allowing a single party member to motion for a vote to remove the speaker, appointing additional Freedom Caucus members to the House Rules Committee, and holding votes on bills concerning congressional term limits in the United States and border security.[105] At the same time, the Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with McCarthy, reached an agreement with the Club for Growth not to spend money in the primary election of Republicans in open districts that are considered safe seats for the party.[106]

January 2023 election for speaker (4th through 6th ballots)
Party Candidate 4th ballot 5th ballot 6th ballot
Votes % Votes % Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries (NY 8) 212 49.0% 212 49.0% 212 49.0%
Republican Kevin McCarthy (CA 20) 201 46.4% 201 46.4% 201 46.4%
Republican Byron Donalds (FL 19) 20 4.6% 20 4.6% 20 4.6%
Total votes 433 100% 433 100% 433 100%
Voted present 1 1 1
Vacant 1 1 1
Votes needed to win 217 >50% 217 >50% 217 >50%

Ballots 7–11 (January 5)

Byron Donalds of Florida was among those Republicans who were not nominated but received at least a vote on the first ballot; he was officially nominated from the fourth ballot and received at least a vote until the eleventh ballot.

On the seventh ballot, John James of Michigan nominated McCarthy, Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, and Dan Bishop of North Carolina nominated Donalds. Gaetz, who had voted for Donalds on the fourth, fifth, and sixth ballots, instead voted for Trump. All other members voted for the same candidates as they did on the fourth, fifth, and sixth ballots.[107][108]

On the eighth ballot, Brian Mast of Florida nominated McCarthy, Katherine Clark of Massachusetts nominated Jeffries, and Biggs nominated Donalds. Boebert, as well as Josh Brecheen of Oklahoma, who had both previously supported Donalds, cast their votes for Hern, who was not formally nominated. All other members voted for the same candidates as they did on the seventh ballot.[109]

On the ninth ballot, Troy Nehls of Texas nominated McCarthy, Ted Lieu of California nominated Jeffries, Matt Rosendale of Montana nominated Donalds, and Boebert nominated Hern.[110] All members voted for the same candidates as they did on the eighth ballot, except Gaetz, who voted for Hern instead of Trump.[111] Buck, who had been a McCarthy supporter, was absent from the vote and subsequent votes due to travel for a planned non-emergency medical procedure in Colorado.[112]

On the tenth ballot, Juan Ciscomani of Arizona nominated McCarthy,[113] Aguilar again nominated Jeffries, Anna Paulina Luna of Florida nominated Donalds,[114] and Boebert again nominated Hern.[115] Donalds continued as the main Republican opposition to McCarthy,[116] while Hern was nominated for the ninth, tenth, and eleventh ballots, receiving as many as seven votes.[115]

On the eleventh ballot, French Hill of Arkansas nominated McCarthy,[117] Joe Neguse of Colorado nominated Jeffries, Gaetz nominated Trump,[118] and Good nominated Hern.[119] After the ballot, the House voted 219−213 to adjourn until 12:00 p.m. on January 6.[120] Tim Burchett of Tennessee joined all Democrats in voting against adjournment.[121] McCarthy continued to negotiate with the Republican hardliners with further concessions, including seats on influential committees (such as the Rules Committee) and lowering the threshold to a single House member for triggering a vote on whether to unseat the speaker.[6]

January 2023 election for speaker (7th through 11th ballots)
Party Candidate 7th ballot 8th ballot 9th ballot 10th ballot 11th ballot
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries (NY 8) 212 49.0% 212 49.0% 212 49.1% 212 49.1% 212 49.1%
Republican Kevin McCarthy (CA 20) 201 46.4% 201 46.4% 200 46.3% 200 46.3% 200 46.3%
Republican Byron Donalds (FL 19) 19 4.4% 17 3.9% 17 3.9% 13 3.0% 12 2.8%
Republican Kevin Hern (OK 1) 2 0.5% 3 0.7% 7 1.6% 7 1.6%
Republican Donald Trump 1 0.2% 1 0.2% 1 0.2%
Total votes 433 100% 433 100% 432 100% 432 100% 432 100%
Voted present 1 1 1 1 1
Absent 0 0 1 1 1
Vacant 1 1 1 1 1
Votes needed to win 217 >50% 217 >50% 217 >50% 217 >50% 217 >50%

Ballots 12–15 (January 6)

When the House reconvened on January 6,[c] Mike Garcia of California nominated McCarthy for the twelfth ballot. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina nominated Jeffries, Gaetz nominated Jordan, and Boebert again nominated Hern. On the twelfth ballot, 14 Republicans who had previously opposed McCarthy voted for him, while seven others voted for Jordan or Hern. Buck, David Trone of Maryland,[122] and Wesley Hunt of Texas were absent. Buck and Trone were absent due to scheduled medical procedures; Hunt returned to Texas because his wife was in a hospital following the premature birth of their son.[123] This ballot marked the first time McCarthy won a plurality of the votes, after receiving votes from 14 Republicans who had previously opposed his nomination; he nonetheless fell short of a majority.[124]

On the thirteenth ballot, James Comer of Kentucky nominated McCarthy and Veronica Escobar of Texas nominated Jeffries. For the first time, there were no other nominations. Andy Harris of Maryland voted for McCarthy for the first time on this ballot. This left only six Republicans who did not vote for McCarthy. Trone, who was absent on the previous ballot due to undergoing shoulder surgery that morning, returned to the House to continue voting for Jeffries.[125][126] Scalise then moved to adjourn until 10:00 p.m., in order to allow time for the two absent Republicans to return to Congress. The motion was adopted following a 220–212 vote split along party lines.[127]

When the House reconvened at 10 p.m., Patrick McHenry of North Carolina nominated McCarthy and Aguilar again nominated Jeffries on the fourteenth ballot. Boebert and Gaetz voted present, Buck and Hunt returned to vote for McCarthy, and four Republicans voted against McCarthy, with two votes for Biggs and two votes for Jordan. McCarthy, who was one vote short of becoming speaker, approached Boebert and Gaetz on the floor and attempted unsuccessfully to convince them to vote for him. As Rogers was arguing with Gaetz, he had to be physically restrained by Richard Hudson of North Carolina.[128] According to The New York Times, Gaetz was seeking a subcommittee chairmanship in the House Armed Services Committee, of which Rogers was in line to become chairman.[129]

After a confrontation between McCarthy and Gaetz, 1:28 into the video, Richard Hudson of North Carolina is seen restraining Mike Rogers of Alabama from leaning towards Gaetz.

The House then proceeded to vote on a motion to adjourn until 12 p.m. on January 9, with McHenry making the motion to adjourn. The plan was to give time to convince the four Republicans who continued to vote for someone other than McCarthy on the 14th ballot to switch their votes to present in order to lower the threshold needed to elect a speaker. It was determined that the plan would not be able to yield a winner if executed on January 9 because a couple of Republicans were unable to attend the session on that day due to family obligations. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia then called Donald Trump on her cell phone, and passed the phone around to the members-elect who continued to refuse to vote for McCarthy. The remaining holdout Republicans eventually agreed to switch their votes, and as a result many Republicans, including McCarthy, scrambled to change their vote from supporting adjournment to opposing it in hopes of a successful fifteenth ballot to take place immediately.[130] As the vote to adjourn drew to a close, many members began to chant "One more time!"[131] Due to the Republicans' switch, the motion failed 155−279, and the House remained in session; 67 Republicans were counted in opposition of adjournment, joined by all Democrats.[132]

On the fifteenth ballot, Bruce Westerman of Arkansas nominated McCarthy and Dean Phillips of Minnesota nominated Jeffries. The final vote began at 11:50 p.m.,[133] and the threshold of 215 members present and voting needed for a majority (excluding those present and not voting) was reached at 12:29 a.m.[134] With a majority of votes cast, McCarthy was elected speaker at 12:37 a.m. after the results were read by the clerk.[135][136]

Following the election, Hal Rogers of Kentucky, the House dean, administered the oath of office to McCarthy as speaker, and McCarthy swore in all members of the House en masse. The House then agreed at 1:52 a.m. to adjourn until 5:00 p.m. on January 9 by voice vote, without any audible opposition.[137]

January 2023 election for speaker (12th through 15th ballots)
Party Candidate 12th ballot 13th ballot 14th ballot 15th ballot[c]
Votes % Votes % Votes % Votes %
Republican Kevin McCarthy (CA 20) 213 49.4% 214 49.5% 216 50.0% 216 50.5%
Democratic Hakeem Jeffries (NY 8) 211 49.0% 212 49.1% 212 49.1% 212 49.5%
Republican Jim Jordan (OH 4) 4 0.9% 6 1.4% 2 0.45%
Republican Kevin Hern (OK 1) 3 0.7%
Republican Andy Biggs (AZ 5) 2 0.45%
Total votes 431 100% 432 100% 432 100% 428 100%
Voted present 0 0 2 6
Absent 3 2 0 0
Vacant 1 1 1 1
Votes needed to win 216 >50% 217 >50% 217 >50% 215 >50%

All ballots: votes not cast for party nominee

All House members of the 118th Congress voted for their party's nominee on every ballot except as noted here.[28]

Member Party District Ballot vote cast
January 3 January 4 January 5 January 6
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15[c]
Andy Biggs Republican AZ 5 Biggs Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan present
Dan Bishop Republican NC 8 Biggs Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Lauren Boebert Republican CO 3 Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan present
Josh Brecheen Republican OK 2 Banks Jordan Donalds Hern McCarthy
Ken Buck Republican CO 4 McCarthy absent[d] McCarthy
Michael Cloud Republican TX 27 Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Andrew Clyde Republican GA 9 Biggs Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Eli Crane Republican AZ 2 Biggs Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan Biggs present
Byron Donalds Republican FL 19 McCarthy Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Matt Gaetz Republican FL 1 Biggs Jordan Donalds Trump Hern Trump Jordan present
Bob Good Republican VA 5 Biggs Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan present
Paul Gosar Republican AZ 9 Biggs Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Andy Harris Republican MD 1 Zeldin Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan McCarthy
Wesley Hunt Republican TX 38 McCarthy absent[e] McCarthy
Anna Paulina Luna Republican FL 13 Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Mary Miller Republican IL 15 Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Ralph Norman Republican SC 5 Biggs Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Andy Ogles Republican TN 5 Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Scott Perry Republican PA 10 Biggs Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Matt Rosendale Republican MT 2 Biggs Jordan Donalds Hern Jordan Biggs present
Chip Roy Republican TX 21 Donalds Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Keith Self Republican TX 3 Jordan Donalds McCarthy
Victoria Spartz Republican IN 5 McCarthy present McCarthy
David Trone Democratic MD 6 Jeffries absent[f] Jeffries

All ballots: summary of votes

  Democratic nominee
  Republican nominee
Speaker ballot
Date January 3 January 4 January 5 January 6
Ballot 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th[c]
Lee Zeldin 1
Jim Banks 1
Donald Trump 1 1
Kevin Hern 2 3 7 3
Byron Donalds 1 20 19 17 13 12
Jim Jordan 6 19 20 4 6 2
Andy Biggs 10 2
Hakeem Jeffries 212 211 212
Kevin McCarthy 203 202 201 200 213 214 216 216
Votes needed 218 217 216 217 215
Total votes 434 433 432 431 432 428
Present 1 2 6
Not voting 1[d] 3[d][e][f] 2[d][e]

Impact

McCarthy holds the gavel following his election as Speaker of the House

Historical context

Thirteen of the fourteen prior U.S. speaker elections that took more than one ballot occurred before the American Civil War. The 68th Congress in 1923 was the last time it took more than one ballot to elect a speaker, and the 36th Congress in 1859 was the last time it took more than nine ballots to elect a speaker.[2] The record number is 133 ballots during the 34th Congress in 1855,[138][139] and this election had the fifth-highest number of ballots.[27] In 2023, the election results and its length causing instability were widely reported by media around the world.[140]

Consequences while there was no speaker

While the House was without a speaker, Congress could not pass bills or adopt resolutions. Incoming members could not set up their constituent services and were barred from accessing their security clearances. The speaker's place in the U.S. presidential line of succession was skipped, and the president pro tempore of the U.S. Senate (in 2023, Patty Murray of Washington) became second in the line after the vice president (Kamala Harris of California).[141][142][143]

Moreover, the government of the District of Columbia was unable to enact any laws. Because the District of Columbia Home Rule Act specifies that laws passed by the district are subject to a congressional review period before becoming law, the district must hand-deliver physical copies of the laws to both the Senate's president pro tempore and the House's speaker. Therefore, with no speaker to receive the copies, the congressional review period could not begin.[144]

C-SPAN popularity

C-SPAN, an American non-governmental cable and satellite television network that televises proceedings of the House, was approved before the speaker election to operate its cameras with its own staff, free of the restrictions by government employees who usually provide its feed. This deviation from its typical broadcast style captured members huddled and reaction shots that viewers do not normally see.[145] C-SPAN aired extremely unlikely conversations between unaligned members, such as Gosar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York,[146] and focused on George Santos of New York, a newly elected Republican member accused of lying about much of his biography.[147] The network saw increased popularity as it broadcast the election.[146]

On January 8, Chip Roy, one of the Republicans who held out on voting for McCarthy, stated that C-SPAN's increased independence was a good thing and that he may be open to it being permanent.[148] The restrictions traditionally placed upon C-SPAN went back into effect after the House established its rules. Matt Gaetz, another Republican holdout, introduced an amendment that would allow C-SPAN "to broadcast and record the floor proceedings of the House with not less than 4 cameras owned and operated by [them]".[149] C-SPAN also submitted a formal petition to McCarthy to give it more independence. Democrat Maxwell Frost of Florida also announced his support for C-SPAN's requests.[149]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The Twentieth Amendment states that all members' terms begin at noon on January 3. Until officially sworn-in, members are referred to as members-elect.
  2. ^ Zeldin, whose term as a House member had ended with the close of the 117th and previous Congress, was no longer an incumbent representative. He received one or more votes on this ballot without being formally nominated.
  3. ^ a b c d The January 6 legislative day extended slightly into the calendar day of January 7.
  4. ^ a b c d Buck missed votes due to a previously scheduled medical procedure.
  5. ^ a b c Hunt missed votes to return home after his wife was readmitted to the hospital following the premature birth of their child earlier in the week.
  6. ^ a b Trone missed a vote due to a previously scheduled medical procedure.

References

  1. ^ Tomasky, Michael (January 3, 2023). "Get Ready for the Most Chaotic, Do-Nothingest Congress in Modern History". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023. Today [January 3, 2023] marks the opening of the new session of the Congress of the United States of America, a ritual convening that goes all the way back to March 4, 1789, when the 26 senators and the 65 members of the House of Representatives who made up that 1st legislative session began our great democratic tradition, those 234 years ago.
  2. ^ a b Linton, Caroline (January 5, 2023). "Only 8 House speaker votes in history have taken more ballots than this one". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  3. ^ a b c Morgan, David; Warburton, Moira; Sullivan, Andy (January 7, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy elected U.S. House speaker, but at a cost". Reuters. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  4. ^ Wolf, Zachary B. (January 4, 2023). "What do these hardliners want? Here's what they've said". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  5. ^ Sotomayor, Marianna; Alemany, Jacqueline; Wang, Amy B.; Kane, Paul (January 5, 2023). "McCarthy makes fresh concessions to try to woo hard-right Republicans in speaker bid". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  6. ^ a b Matza, Max (January 5, 2023). "Three days. Eleven votes. Still no US House speaker". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  7. ^ Zurcher, Anthony (January 7, 2023). "What has Kevin McCarthy given up, and at what price?". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  8. ^ Ivory, Danielle; Smart, Charlie; Yourish, Karen (January 4, 2023). "How Far Right Are the 20 Republicans Who Voted Against McCarthy?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  9. ^ Shephard, Alex (January 5, 2023). "The Anti-McCarthy Right Has No End Goal Other Than Humiliating Him". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  10. ^ a b Cortellessa, Eric (January 5, 2023). "How McCarthy's Concessions Could Transform the House". Time. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  11. ^ Debusmann, Bernd; Murphy, Matt (January 6, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy elected US House Speaker after 15 rounds of voting". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  12. ^ Dorn, Sara (January 3, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy's Historic Loss: House Adjourns After He Fails To Win Speaker Vote After 3 Rounds". Forbes. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  13. ^ "House adjourns without choosing Speaker after Republican revolt". BBC News. January 3, 2023. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  14. ^ Sotomayor, Marianna; Alemany, Jacqueline; Caldwell, Leigh Ann (January 3, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy faces open GOP revolt as House fails to elect speaker". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  15. ^ Slattery, Gram; Morgan, David; Slattery, Gram (January 7, 2023). "Hardline Republicans dig in against McCarthy's House speaker bid". Reuters. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  16. ^ Forte, David F. (October 19, 2010). "Essays on Article I: Speaker of the House". Heritage Guide to The Constitution. The Heritage Foundation. Archived from the original on August 22, 2020. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  17. ^ "The First Day of a New Congress: A Guide to Proceedings on the House Floor, rev. Dec. 19, 2018" (PDF). Congressional Research Service. December 19, 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 27, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  18. ^ a b c Heitshusen, Valerie; Beth, Richard S. (January 4, 2019). "Speakers of the House: Elections, 1913–2019" (PDF). CRS Report for Congress. Washington, D.C.: Congressional Research Service. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 3, 2021. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  19. ^ 2 U.S.C. § 25
  20. ^ Jalonick, Mary Clare (January 5, 2023). "US House has no members, no rules as speaker race drags on". Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  21. ^ Forrest, Jack; et al. (January 4, 2023). "The lack of a new speaker has ground House business to a halt". CNN. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  22. ^ Grier, Peter (September 25, 2015). "John Boehner exit: Anyone can run for House speaker, even you". The Christian Science Monitor. Archived from the original on November 25, 2018. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  23. ^ "Election of the Speaker Overview". Laws.com. October 28, 2011. Archived from the original on August 27, 2019. Retrieved January 11, 2019.
  24. ^ "Fathers/Deans of the House". United States House of Representatives. November 9, 2016. Archived from the original on January 12, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  25. ^ "Oath of Office". US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. January 3, 2013. Archived from the original on November 9, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  26. ^ a b c Looker, Rachel; Elbeshbishi, Sarah; Woodall, Candy; Jackson, David; Tran, Ken (January 3, 2023). "McCarthy loses first ballot in House speaker race in face of GOP infighting: live updates". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  27. ^ a b The Associated Press (January 5, 2023). "No end to deadlock: U.S. House adjourns as McCarthy fails on 11th ballot to be Speaker". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  28. ^ a b c McCartney, Allison; Parlapiano, Alicia; Wu, Ashley; Zhang, Christine; Williams, Josh; Cochrane, Emily; Murphy, John-Michael (January 6, 2023). "Vote Count: McCarthy Elected House Speaker After 15 Ballots". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  29. ^ Caygle, Heather; Bade, Rachael; Bresnahan, John (December 12, 2018). "Pelosi clinches deal with rebels in speakership standoff". Politico. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  30. ^ Marcos, Cristina; Schnell, Mychael (January 26, 2022). "Pelosi says she will run for reelection in 2022". The Hill. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  31. ^ Walsh, Deirdre (January 25, 2022). "Pelosi is running for reelection but is silent on a bid to retain her leadership post". NPR. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  32. ^ Quinn, Melissa; Becket, Stefan; Navaroo, Aaron; Linton, Caroline; Corujo, Cristina; Woolley, John (November 17, 2022). "House 2022 midterm elections results - Republicans win majority to control House, CBS News projects". CBS News. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  33. ^ a b Vazquez, Maegan; Vogt, Adrienne; Chowdhury, Maureen; Hammond, Elise; Myer, Matt (November 17, 2022). "Pelosi addresses her future plans after GOP wins House". CNN. Archived from the original on November 22, 2022. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  34. ^ Chatelain, Ryan; Frey, Kevin (November 18, 2023). "Hakeem Jeffries announces bid to lead House Democrats". NY1. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  35. ^ Jackson, Herb (November 30, 2022). "Jeffries elected first Black leader of a congressional caucus". Roll Call. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  36. ^ Burnett, Elena; Kenin, Justine (January 4, 2023). "Hakeem Jeffries is the first Black lawmaker to have been nominated for Speaker of the House". NPR. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  37. ^ Martin, Jonathan (November 4, 2022). "How a secret meeting put Hakeem Jeffries on track to replace Pelosi". Politico. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  38. ^ a b c d Grayer, Annie; Raju, Manu; Diaz, Daneilla (November 11, 2022). "House Democrats quietly plot leadership plans while waiting for Nancy Pelosi's next move". CNN. Archived from the original on December 29, 2022. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  39. ^ a b Lillis, Mike (November 17, 2022). "Hoyer won't seek House leadership, Clyburn eyeing run for No. 4 spot". The Hill. Archived from the original on November 18, 2022. Retrieved November 18, 2022.
  40. ^ Ferris, Sarah; Wu, Nicholas (November 16, 2022). "Schiff passes on Dem leadership bid as Pelosi's future stays murky". Politico. Archived from the original on November 18, 2022. Retrieved November 18, 2022.
  41. ^ Mascaro, Lisa (November 30, 2022). "Jeffries wins historic bid to lead House Dems after Pelosi". Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  42. ^ Choi, Matthew (November 15, 2022). "Kevin McCarthy elected House GOP leader over objections from Chip Roy, Michael Cloud and other hard-liners". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  43. ^ Multiple sources:
  44. ^ Bialik, Carl; Bycoffe, Aaron (September 25, 2015). "The Hard-Line Republicans Who Pushed John Boehner Out". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved February 18, 2023.
  45. ^ Newton-Small, Jay (September 25, 2015). "Meet Kevin McCarthy: The Frontrunner to Replace John Boehner". Time. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  46. ^ Temple-West, Michael (October 11, 2015). "House Freedom Caucus would look 'favorably' on Ryan as speaker". Politico. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  47. ^ Shegreen, Deirdre (October 21, 2015). "Ryan wins Freedom Caucus majority, but not endorsement for Speaker". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  48. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer (October 8, 2015). "Kevin McCarthy Drops Out of House Speaker Race". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 6, 2020. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  49. ^ Steinhauer, Jennifer (October 29, 2015). "Paul Ryan Is Elected House Speaker, Hoping to Manage Chaos". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  50. ^ Cheney, Kyle; Ferris, Sarah (November 14, 2018). "McCarthy hits hard at Dems after winning minority leader post". Politico. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  51. ^ Foran, Clare Foran; Killough, Ashley; Landers, Elizabeth (November 14, 2018). "Kevin McCarthy elected minority leader, will lead House Republicans after Paul Ryan's exit". CNN. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  52. ^ Jones, Dustin (November 9, 2022). "Rep. Kevin McCarthy has announced his bid for House speaker". NPR. Archived from the original on December 22, 2022. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  53. ^ House, Billy; Wasson, Erik (November 14, 2022). "McCarthy Gets GOP Challenge for US House Speaker From Arizona Conservative". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  54. ^ Brooks, Emily (November 25, 2022). "Whip List: McCarthy searches for 218 GOP Speakership votes". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  55. ^ Rakich, Nathaniel (December 9, 2022). "How Kevin McCarthy Could Lose The Election For Speaker Of The House". FiveThirtyEight. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  56. ^ Rodgers, Alex (November 15, 2022). "Kevin McCarthy beats far-right challenger 188–31 to lead House GOP". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  57. ^ LeBlanc, Paul (December 12, 2022). "Youngkin schedules February special election in Virginia to fill Donald McEachin's seat". CNN. Archived from the original on December 20, 2022. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  58. ^ Griffing, Alex. "Moderate Republican Doubles Down on Threat to Work With Democrats to Elect a House Speaker if GOP Rebels Tank McCarthy". Mediaite. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023 – via MSN.
  59. ^ Carney, Jordain; Moneymaker, Anna (December 3, 2022). "With Kevin McCarthy's quest for the speaker's gavel in turbulent waters, lawmakers are publicly and privately floating alternatives". Politico. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  60. ^ Ferris, Sarah; Beavers, Olivia; Carney, Jordain (January 3, 2023). "Open revolt: McCarthy rejected a second time". Politico. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  61. ^ "Gingrich: This could turn into chaos for Republicans". Fox News. January 2, 2023. Archived from the original on January 10, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023 – via YouTube.
  62. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Carney, Jordain (January 2, 2023). "Conservatives threaten to withhold critical McCarthy support, hours before speaker vote". Politico. Archived from the original on January 2, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  63. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Carney, Jordain (November 10, 2022). "House Freedom Caucus ties itself in knots over challenging McCarthy". Politico. Archived from the original on December 19, 2022. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  64. ^ Solender, Andrew (December 9, 2022). "Right-wing demand list further complicates McCarthy's speaker bid". Axios. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  65. ^ Ferris, Sarah; Beavers, Olivia. "McCarthy relents on key conservative demand — but uncertainty remains over speaker bid". Politico. Archived from the original on January 2, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  66. ^ Choi, Matthew (January 5, 2023). "Chip Roy, key McCarthy opponent, steps up as top negotiator in House speaker standoff". Texas Tribune. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 9, 2023.
  67. ^ Hooks, Christopher (January 5, 2023). "Chip Roy, Bless His Heart". Texas Monthly. Archived from the original on January 8, 2023. Retrieved January 9, 2023.
  68. ^ "Justin Amash offers to serve as 'nonpartisan' Speaker". The Hill. November 16, 2022. Retrieved June 14, 2023.
  69. ^ MLive, Julie Mack | special to (January 4, 2023). "Fred Upton on potential House Speaker bid: 'Intriguing proposal'". mlive. Retrieved June 14, 2023.
  70. ^ "House Adjourns Without a Speaker". The New York Times. January 3, 2023. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  71. ^ Wilkie, Christina; Cox, Chelsey; Kopecki, Dawn (January 6, 2023). "GOP leader McCarthy elected House Speaker on 15th vote in historic run". CNBC. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  72. ^ a b c Wagner, John; et al. (January 3, 2023). "McCarthy fails to win House speakership on third ballot". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  73. ^ a b c d Hammond, Elise; SangaL, Aditi; Chowdhury, Maureen; Powell, Tori B. (January 3, 2023). "The latest on the new Congress and House speaker vote". CNN. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  74. ^ Segers, Grace (January 5, 2023). "No Speaker, No Rules, No End in Sight: Inside the House's Descent Into Purgatory". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  75. ^ a b c Wagner, John; Alfaro, Mariana (January 4, 2023). "McCarthy loses 4th House speaker vote as GOP standoff continues". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  76. ^ a b c d e Sangal, Aditi; Vogt, Adrienne; Hayes, Mike; Chowdhury, Maureen; Hammond, Elise (January 4, 2023). "GOP deadlocked over House speaker vote". CNN. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  77. ^ "This has officially been the longest fight for House speaker since before the Civil War". Semafor. January 5, 2023. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  78. ^ Goodwin, Liz; Sotomayor, Marianna; Alemany, Jacqueline; Wang, Amy B.; Wells, Dylan (January 6, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy elected House Speaker, breaking historic deadlock". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  79. ^ Mascaro, Lisa; Amiri, Farnoush (January 7, 2023). "McCarthy elected House speaker in rowdy post-midnight vote". Associated Press. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  80. ^ Adragna, Anthony; Wu, Nicholas; Hill, Meredith Lee; LeVine, Marianne (January 7, 2023). "McCarthy claims speakership on 15th ballot". Politico. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  81. ^ Kamisar, Ben; Tablot, Haley; Todd, Chuck (January 3, 2023). "McCarthy short on first speaker ballot but Jeffries consolidates Dems". NBC News. Retrieved October 25, 2023.
  82. ^ Watson, Kathryn; Linton, Caroline (January 3, 2023). "House adjourns without electing speaker after McCarthy fails to win in three rounds of voting". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  83. ^ Schnell, Mychael (January 3, 2023). "Here are the 20 GOP lawmakers who voted against McCarthy for Speaker". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  84. ^ Edmondson, Catie (January 3, 2023). "Live Updates: McCarthy Fails in First Vote on Speaker". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  85. ^ Brooks, Emily (January 3, 2023). "McCarthy blocked from Speakership as House moves to second ballot". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  86. ^ Treene, Alayna (January 3, 2023). "19 Republicans vote against McCarthy on second House speaker ballot". Axios. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  87. ^ Collins, Eliza (January 3, 2023). "A McCarthy Supporter Switches to Jordan During Third Vote". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  88. ^ Fung, Katherine (January 3, 2023). "Byron Donalds Shares Why He Flipped Vote Against Kevin McCarthy". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  89. ^ "House Speaker Election Coverage: House adjourns after McCarthy suffers defeat on third ballot". The Hill. January 3, 2023. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 3, 2023.
  90. ^ Hooper, Kelly (January 4, 2023). "Trump endorses McCarthy after three failed speaker votes". Politico. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  91. ^ Jacobs, Ben (January 3, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy's once-in-a-century House speakership failure". Vox. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  92. ^ Segers, Grace (January 3, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy Has Lost Control of the House GOP". The New Republic. ISSN 0028-6583. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  93. ^ Grim, Ryan (January 4, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy Must Commit to Government Shutdown Over Raising Debt Ceiling, Says Freedom Caucus Holdout". The Intercept. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  94. ^ Jude, Sheerin (January 5, 2023). "McCarthy loses historic 11th vote for House Speaker". BBC News. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  95. ^ Schnell, Mychael (January 4, 2023). "These 21 Republicans did not support McCarthy on Day 2 of the Speaker's vote". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  96. ^ Shapero, Julia (January 4, 2023). "Rep. Spartz explains reasoning behind 'present' vote for Speaker". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  97. ^ Hutzler, Alexandra; Cathey, Libby; Axelrod, Tal; Oppenheim, Oren (January 4, 2023). "New Congress live updates: McCarthy suffers 5th defeat as speaker standoff now in 2nd day". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  98. ^ Mueller, Julia (January 4, 2023). "GOP Rep. Ken Buck says McCarthy should consider stepping aside". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 4, 2023.
  99. ^ "House Speaker election coverage: Chamber narrowly votes to adjourn for day". The Hill. January 5, 2023. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  100. ^ "Final Vote for Roll Call 8". Office of the Clerk, U.S. House of Representatives. January 4, 2023. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  101. ^ House, Billy; Wasson, Erik (January 4, 2023). "House Adjourns as Deal on McCarthy Speaker Bid Remains Elusive". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  102. ^ Carney, Jordain; Ferris, Sarah; Beavers, Olivia (January 4, 2023). "GOP debates: Who could take McCarthy's place?". Politico. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  103. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Ferris, Sarah; Bade, Rachael; Carney, Jordain (January 5, 2023). "GOP stalemates on speaker vote despite McCarthy's proposed deal". Politico. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  104. ^ Blake, Aaron (January 4, 2023). "Here's who could become House Speaker if Kevin McCarthy isn't elected". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  105. ^ Foran, Clare; Zanona, Melanie; Raju, Manu; Fox, Lauren (January 4, 2023). "First on CNN: McCarthy proposes key concessions after House adjourns for second day without electing a speaker". CNN. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  106. ^ Weaver, Al (January 4, 2023). "McCarthy-backed PAC agrees to not spend in safe GOP open-seat primaries in Speakership concession". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  107. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Ferris, Sarah; Bade, Rachael (January 5, 2022). "McCarthy heads to 7th vote with fate still murky". Politico. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  108. ^ Sangal, Aditi; Vogt, Adrienne; Hayes, Mike; Chowdhury, Maureen; Hammond, Elise (January 5, 2023). "GOP deadlocked over House speaker vote". CNN. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  109. ^ Wagner, John; Alfaro, Mariana; Paybarah, Azi; Wang, Amy B.; Scott, Eugene (January 5, 2023). "House moves to an 8th speaker ballot after McCarthy falls short again". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  110. ^ "Reps.-elect McCarthy, Jeffries, Donalds, and Hern Nominated for Speaker on the Ninth Ballot". C-SPAN. January 5, 2023. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  111. ^ Chasmer, Jessica (January 5, 2023). "McCarthy set to lose 9th speaker vote, as Donalds and Hern split GOP votes". Fox News. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  112. ^ Beavers, Olivia; Ferris, Sarah; Carney, Jordain; Bade, Rachael (January 5, 2023). "McCarthy fails on 11th ballot amid hopes for tentative deal with conservatives". Politico. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  113. ^ Edmondson, Catie (January 5, 2023). "House Speaker Vote: Updates". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  114. ^ "In addition to McCarthy, these 3 lawmakers were nominated for House speaker". CNN. January 5, 2023. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  115. ^ a b Astor, Maggie (January 5, 2023). "Who is Kevin Hern? More about one of the rebels' protest candidates". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  116. ^ "House Speaker election coverage: House moves directly into eighth vote after McCarthy loses seventh". The Hill. January 5, 2023. Archived from the original on January 5, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  117. ^ Gold, Michael (January 5, 2023). "House Speaker Vote: Updates". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023. We'd heard chatter that there would be a motion to adjourn coming up, but French Hill of Arkansas just stood up to nominate Kevin McCarthy.
  118. ^ Gold, Michael (January 5, 2023). "House Speaker Vote: Updates". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023. It was Democrat Joe Neguse's turn to nominate Hakeem Jeffries, and he brought up the Jan. 6, 2021 attack by former President Donald Trump's supporters on the Capitol, a day before its anniversary. Matt Gaetz immediately followed and nominated Trump, lauding the former president's achievements.
  119. ^ Gold, Michael (January 5, 2023). "House Speaker Vote: Updates". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 5, 2023. As we enter the 11th ballot, we're not done with speaker nominations yet. Bob Good of Virginia, after a long wind-up speech, is putting forward Kevin Hern as a candidate.
  120. ^ Sangal, Aditi; Vogt, Adrienne; Hayes, Mike; Chowdhury, Maureen; Hammond, Elise (January 5, 2023). "The House has voted to adjourn until Friday". CNN. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  121. ^ Axelrod, Tal; Cathey, Libby; Hutzler, Alexandra; Siegel, Benjamin; Oppenheim, Oren (January 5, 2023). "House adjourns after 3 days of failed votes". ABC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023. House Republicans successfully, though narrowly, voted on Thursday night to adjourn until noon on Friday following another day of unsuccessfully trying to choose a speaker.
  122. ^ Shabad, Rebecca (January 6, 2023). "House speaker live updates: McCarthy bid heads into the fourth day: House Democrat skips votes due to surgery". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  123. ^ Sforza, Lauren (January 6, 2023). "Incoming Texas Republican returning to Texas after son born prematurely". The Hill. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  124. ^ Karni, Annie; Edmondson, Katie (January 5, 2023). "Speaker Live Updates: 14 Detractors Flip but McCarthy Loses 12th Ballot". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  125. ^ Shabad, Rebecca (January 6, 2023). "House speaker vote live updates: McCarthy bid gains support but still short: Rep. David Trone gets standing ovation after returning to vote after surgery". NBC News. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  126. ^ Alvarez, Alejandro (January 6, 2023). "After surgery, Maryland congressman rejoins marathon speaker vote—in hospital socks". WTOP. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  127. ^ Wagner, John; Alfaro, Mariana; Wang, Amy B.; Scott, Eugene (January 6, 2023). "This just in: The House moves to adjourn until 10 p.m. Eastern". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  128. ^ Wu, Nicholas; Hill, Meredith Lee (January 7, 2023). "Two lawmakers nearly come to blows — and other crazy moments from McCarthy's final speaker votes". Politico. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  129. ^ Broadwater, Luke (January 7, 2023). "The Moment When Tempers Really Got Out of Control on the House Floor". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  130. ^ Bade, Rachael (January 7, 2023). "POLITICO Playbook: Inside the 28 minutes that saved Kevin McCarthy". Politico. Archived from the original on January 8, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  131. ^ Woodall, Candy; Jackson, David; Lee, Ella; Looker, Rachel (January 6, 2023). "Recap: In dramatic 15th ballot, Republican Kevin McCarthy clinches House speaker vote; members sworn in". USA Today. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  132. ^ Collins, Elizza (January 6, 2023). "Motion to Adjourn Fails". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  133. ^ Dutton, Jack; Giella, Lauren (January 5, 2023). "House Speaker Vote Updates: Election enters third day amid GOP Conflict". Newsweek. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  134. ^ "As it happened: Kevin McCarthy finally elected Speaker on 15th vote". BBC News. January 6, 2023. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  135. ^ "House of Representatives, January 6, 2023, part 2" (PDF). Congressional Record. January 6, 2023. Archived (PDF) from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  136. ^ "Kevin McArthy [sic] elected as Speaker after 15 ballots". Now Habersham. January 7, 2023. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  137. ^ Watson, Kathryn; Quinn, Melissa (January 7, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy wins speaker race after a grueling 4 days and 15 rounds of voting". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  138. ^ "Speaker Elections Decided by Multiple Ballots". US House of Representatives: History, Art & Archives. November 30, 2015. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  139. ^ "McCarthy's GOP support splinters as House adjourns without speaker". NBC News. January 3, 2022. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  140. ^ Multiple examples:
  141. ^ Vu, Nancy (January 3, 2023). "Kevin McCarthy's troubled bid for speaker. Swearing-in ceremonies. McConnell becomes longest-serving Senate party leader". Politico. Archived from the original on January 3, 2023. Retrieved January 8, 2023.
  142. ^ Broadwater, Luke (January 4, 2023). "Lacking a Speaker, One Part of Government Ceases to Function". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  143. ^ Astor, Maggie (January 5, 2023). "Sen. Patty Murray Is Second in Line to Presidency, For Now". The New York Times. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023 – via Yahoo! News.
  144. ^ Austermuhle, Martin (January 5, 2023). "Bills Passed by D.C. Council Remain in Awkward Limbo as Republicans Fail to Elect Speaker of the House". DCist. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  145. ^ DeChalus, Camila (January 5, 2023). "With the House in Chaos, C-SPAN Shows Footage Americans Don't Usually See". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  146. ^ a b Werpin, Alex (January 5, 2023). "C-SPAN Is America's Hottest TV Drama in 2023". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on January 6, 2023. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  147. ^ Zak, Dan; Terris, Ben (January 3, 2023). "George Santos had an awkward first day at the office". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 4, 2023. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  148. ^ Olander, Olivia (January 8, 2023). "GOP Lawmaker Open to Letting C-SPAN Cameras Run Free". Politico. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
  149. ^ a b Kamisar, Ben; Stewart, Kyle (January 10, 2023). "Some Lawmakers Want McCarthy to Allow C-SPAN Cameras in House Chamber". NBCNews. Retrieved January 13, 2023.
This page was last edited on 15 June 2024, at 06:49
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.