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James Underwood

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Sir James Underwood
Born (1942-04-11) 11 April 1942 (age 78)
NationalityBritish
Alma materSt Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College
Known forGeneral and Systematic Pathology[1]
AwardsThe Cunningham Medal,[2] The Doniach Award[3]
Scientific career
FieldsMedicine, Pathologist
InstitutionsSchool of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Sheffield

Sir James Cresseé Elphinstone Underwood FMedSci (born 11 April 1942) is a British pathologist who was awarded a knighthood for services to medicine in the 2005 New Year honours list.[4]

Early life and education

Underwood was born at Walsall in 1942, where his father, John Underwood, was a general practitioner.[5] The family settled in Cheltenham in 1948. He was educated at Downside School, Somerset.[6] From 1960-1965 he was a medical student at St Bartholomew's Hospital Medical College,[7] and a house doctor at St Stephen's Hospital, Chelsea.

Career

He was formerly the Dean of Sheffield University's Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and the Joseph Hunter Professor of Pathology at the same university as well as Consultant Histopathologist to the Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust.[8] From 2000–2002, by election, he served as the President of the British Division of the International Academy of Pathology[9] and he was later elected as the President of the Royal College of Pathologists from 2002–2005.[10][11]

He led his profession's response to the problems arising from tissue retention and use in the UK.[12] Just before retirement, at the age of 64, professor Underwood became a fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.[13]

He was a member of the Human Tissue Authority, which monitors and regulates use of human organs in research and education.[14] During his career Sir James recalled making a mistake when he mistook a benign adenomatoid tumor for a malignant testicular tumor, which resulted in the patient having a testicle removed unnecessarily.[15]

Research interests

Personal

Sir James Underwood and his wife, Lady Alice, have three children.[19][20] Outside work, he finds music interesting and he enjoys walks with his family.[21]

Books

  • The book Underwood's Pathology: a Clinical Approach (published in 2013), was named after Sir James,[22] and it won the 2014 British Medical Association Student Textbook Award.[23]
  • Co-editor of General and Systematic Pathology, Churchill Livingstone, 2009 (5th edition). Previous editions have won Sir James and contributing authors the Royal Society of Medicine Book Award (2000, 3rd Edition) and the British Medical Association Student Textbook Award (2005, 4th Edition) and a first prize in the British Book Design and Production Awards (2001, 3rd Edition).[7]
  • Former co-editor of Recent Advances in Histopathology[24][25][26][27][28]
  • Editor of Introduction to biopsy interpretation and surgical pathology[29]
  • Editor of Pathology of the nucleus[30]
  • Editor of Case studies in General and Systematic Pathology[31]
  • Former editor of the journal Histopathology

References

  1. ^ J.C.E Underwood, S.S Cross (2009). General and Systematic Pathology (5th ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. p. 872. ISBN 978-0-443-06888-1.
  2. ^ "The Cunningham Medal". Archived from the original on 27 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2009.
  3. ^ "The Doniach Award". Archived from the original on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 13 August 2009.
  4. ^ "Royal College of Pathologists". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 25 July 2007.
  5. ^ BMJ Obituary. Retrieved 2007-09-08
  6. ^ Underwood, Sir James Cresseé Elphinstone, in Who's Who 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-15
  7. ^ a b "International Academy of Pathology limited". Archived from the original on 22 September 2007. Retrieved 27 July 2007.
  8. ^ "The University of Sheffield". Archived from the original on 24 April 2007. Retrieved 25 July 2007.
  9. ^ "The BDIAP Newsletter" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 July 2011. Retrieved 6 June 2009.
  10. ^ "The Royal College of Pathologists". Archived from the original on 14 August 2007. Retrieved 27 July 2007.
  11. ^ "The Jean Shanks Foundation". Retrieved 6 June 2009.
  12. ^ "Alder Hey: Leading pathologist James Underwood quizzed". BBC News. 31 January 2001. Retrieved 25 July 2007.
  13. ^ "The Academy of Medical Sciences: Directory". Retrieved 6 June 2009.
  14. ^ "Human Tissue Authority". Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 25 July 2007.
  15. ^ National Patient Protection Agency, retrieved 21 November 2010[permanent dead link]
  16. ^ "The 47th Annual Congress of the Federation of South African Societies of Pathology". Archived from the original on 13 October 2007. Retrieved 27 July 2007.
  17. ^ "Pub Med". Retrieved 12 August 2009.
  18. ^ "Nottingham Trent University distinguished lecturer series". Archived from the original on 21 December 2010. Retrieved 18 July 2011.
  19. ^ "The Shipman Inquiry". Archived from the original on 19 June 2009. Retrieved 6 June 2009.
  20. ^ J.C.E Underwood (2004). General and Systematic Pathology (4th ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. p. 839. ISBN 978-0-443-07334-2.
  21. ^ Amazon:General and Systematic Pathology (Paperback). ASIN 0443052824.
  22. ^ Cross, Simon S. (2013). Amazon. ISBN 978-0702046728.
  23. ^ "BMA Medical Book Awards". 2014. Retrieved 15 February 2015.
  24. ^ D.G Lowe, J.C.E Underwood (1999). Recent advances in histopathology (18 ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. p. 280. ISBN 978-0-443-06036-6.
  25. ^ D.G Lowe, J.C.E Underwood (2001). Recent advances in histopathology (19 ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone. p. 248. ISBN 978-0-443-06347-3.
  26. ^ D.G Lowe, J.C.E Underwood (2003). Recent advances in histopathology (20 ed.). London: Royal Society of Medicine. p. 250. ISBN 978-1-85315-511-6.
  27. ^ J.C.E Underwood, M. Pignatelli (2005). Recent advances in histopathology (21 ed.). London: Royal Society of Medicine press. p. 141. ISBN 978-1-85315-598-7.
  28. ^ J.C.E Underwood, M. Pignatelli (2007). Recent advances in histopathology (22 ed.). London: Royal Society of Medicine. p. 223. ISBN 978-1-85315-649-6.
  29. ^ J.C.E Underwood (1981). Introduction to biopsy interpretation and surgical pathology. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. p. 149. ISBN 978-0-387-10434-8.
  30. ^ J.Crocker, J.C.E Underwood (1990). Pathology of the nucleus. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. p. 343. ISBN 978-0-387-51018-7.
  31. ^ J.C.E Underwood (1996). Case studies in General and Systematic Pathology. New York: Churchill Livingstone. p. 175. ISBN 978-0-443-05096-1.

External links

Educational offices
Preceded by
Sir John Lilleyman
President of the Royal College of Pathologists
2002 – 2005
Succeeded by
Adrian Newland
This page was last edited on 18 February 2020, at 00:16
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