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J. R. Hildebrand

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

J. R. Hildebrand
J.R. Hildebrand at Fort Meade.jpg
Hildebrand at Fort Meade, 2011
NationalityUnited States American
BornJohn Randal Hildebrand Jr.
(1988-01-03) January 3, 1988 (age 31)
Sausalito, California, U.S.
IndyCar Series career
49 races run over 8 years
Team(s)No. 48 (Dreyer & Reinbold Racing)
2017 position15th
Best finish11th (2012)
First race2010 Honda Indy 200 (Mid-Ohio)
Last race2019 Indianapolis 500 (Indianapolis)
Wins Podiums Poles
0 3 0
Previous series
2019
2009
2008–09
2007
2005–2006
2005
2004
Americas Rallycross Championship
Firestone Indy Lights
A1 Grand Prix
Champ Car Atlantic Series
U.S. F2000
Formula Palmer Audi Autumn Cup
SCCA Formula Russell
Championship titles
2009
2006
2004
Firestone Indy Lights
U.S. F2000
SCCA Formula Russell
Awards
2005
2011
Team USA Scholarship
Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year

John Randal "J.R." Hildebrand Jr. (born January 3, 1988) is an American race car driver. He currently competes in the IndyCar Series for Dreyer & Reinbold Racing. Hildebrand won the 2009 Indy Lights championship, and is best known for nearly winning the 2011 Indianapolis 500.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/2
    Views:
    103 923
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  • ✪ Optimal turns at Indianapolis Motor Speedway with JR Hildebrand | Physics | Khan Academy
  • ✪ Artist Intro with JR Hildebrand

Transcription

SAL KHAN: This is Sal here with famous Indy car driver-- smiling when I said famous-- JR Hildebrand. And since you're here, I thought I would ask a question that's always been on my mind. JR HILDEBRAND: Yeah. SAL KHAN: We have a picture here of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. And I've always wondered how you-- it seems like turning is a very important part of the-- JR HILDEBRAND: It's absolutely an important part of what we're doing. SAL KHAN: --of the race. JR HILDEBRAND: People get fixated on the car going straight. But the turning part is pretty important. SAL KHAN: Turning seems to be the part where a lot of the skill comes into it. And I've always wondered, what is optimal? Do y'all try to minimize your distance and kind of take the turn as quickly or as in short of a distance as possible by really hugging the corner, by going like that? But when you do that, you have to turn more. There's more g-forces. There's more kind of centripetal force that your tires have to deal with, the human has to deal with. Versus taking the outside where you have to cover more distance, but the centripetal acceleration, the g-forces aren't going to be as dramatic. So how do you think about that? JR HILDEBRAND: Well, every track ends up being a little bit different. But when we take Indianapolis here as the example, if you're already on the inside-- it's like the 800 meter runner's kind of path. It's the shortest distance. You can kind of get from point A to point B. The lap is the same every time, so it doesn't actually depend on you running a specific distance or not. For us, in this example, the car actually just won't do that. If you think about being all the way on the inside, being all the way on the inside through the corner, and then exiting all the way on the inside, it's having to do the most work to follow that path. And in Indianapolis, we're approaching turn one at upwards of 240 miles per hour. And that turn one is not-- it's hardly banked. It looks quite flat in person. So as opposed to NASCAR running at Talladega or Daytona, these big, giant super speedways, the car is having to do quite a lot of work to get through the corner here. SAL KHAN: So how do you--? Do you take the outside or--? JR HILDEBRAND: So then you look at that. And I think if you noted the radius-- if you drew a full circle out of each of those arcs-- SAL KHAN: Let's do that. So let's say that this is the shortest distance path. This is kind of a circle that looks something like this. Let me scroll over a little bit so we can see a little bit better. So this would be a circle like this if you were to keep that arc. It would be a circle that looks something like this. JR HILDEBRAND: So that's a pretty small circle in the grand scheme of things here, yeah. SAL KHAN: That's a small circle. And for the larger one, the circle would look something like this. So you have a larger radius, a larger turning radius. So you would have to have less centripetal acceleration, inward acceleration, and fewer g-forces on this outside one, the larger the circle is. JR HILDEBRAND: Right. And a different way to look at it, if you looked at the car trying to just go around these two different circles, and it's going to be going the same speed on either one, it's doing a lot less work to get around this outside circle. And therefore the speed that you could carry around that, that sort of goes up. The car has a limited ability to stick to the racetrack. So opening that up definitely makes a difference. SAL KHAN: But that's an important point. At least in Indianapolis, you're full throttle the entire way. I mean, obviously, if you hit the brakes, the car could do a very small turning radius. But you're at full throttle. You're not going to have any chance if you at all let off the gas. JR HILDEBRAND: That's right. When you qualify at Indianapolis, you've got to put in four laps, four of your best laps of the season, of your career in Indianapolis to qualify. And that you are absolutely flat trap all the way around the racetrack. There's no lifting. There's no braking. SAL KHAN: And so that's why you're saying the car just wouldn't do that. If you're going all out, the car just wouldn't even be able to make this path. JR HILDEBRAND: Exactly. That's a good point. From the driver's perspective, you have to stay flat out if you're going to go fast. If you're going to set a lap time that's relevant, you have to be able to stay flat out. And so at that point, you're searching for the line around the race track that you can do that most efficiently. And so then, in this example, increasing that radius by going from our green circle out to the purple circle does that rather effectively. SAL KHAN: I see. We're going for the purple to the green back to-- so you're saying like this. JR HILDEBRAND: Well, yeah. And so then to find the actual optimal line, what we end up doing is starting out on the outside of the track, then bending the car into the inside of the track, and going back to the outside of the track, really using all of the road that's available to us. SAL KHAN: Right. So that's interesting. So when I posed the question, it was kind of like my brain was just looking at these two circles. But you realize there's a bigger circle that you could fit here, that there's an arc like this. And this would be, if you imagine, this would be a part of a circle that's way huger than even that purple circle that we're drawing. So that center of that circle is like here or something. So you have a lot less centripetal acceleration that you have to place, inward acceleration that you have to place on the car. JR HILDEBRAND: Exactly. And therefore, the car is able to carry a massively increased level of speed through the corner. And that's really what we're looking for. And you consider, I think it's a very interesting-- when I think about what I'm doing as the driver, I don't think I really am consciously thinking that much about the mathematics that go into finding this optimal racing line. You sort of instinctually just gravitate towards what the car feels like it wants to do. But when we look at it from this perspective, you've got the car going down the straight away here. It's at 240 miles per hour. That's almost as fast as the car is going to go. So it's just this sort of terminal velocity. The drag of the air hitting the car won't allow it to go much faster than that. SAL KHAN: The engine's giving all the power it can. JR HILDEBRAND: Yeah. You're absolutely flat out. SAL KHAN: And that's just offsetting the drag of that, so that you can't accelerate to that top speed. JR HILDEBRAND: Exactly. It's almost like you're hitting a wall of air at that point. You're not going to be able to accelerate any faster. And so what you're really trying to do is you're trying to-- in order to set that fastest lap time, which ends up equating to the highest average speed around the lap, that's what's the lowest number in terms of lap time perspective-- you're trying to get the car to most efficiently get through the corners so that you can allow it to accelerate down the straights as much as you can. You're getting it to diverge from this intended course that is going on here as efficiently as you can. And so by creating the largest radius around the corner, that's how we end up finding that optimal line. SAL KHAN: That's fascinating.

Contents

Early career

At the age of 14, Hildebrand started racing go karts in the Jim Russell Arrive and Drive Championship at Infineon Raceway in Northern California; winning not only his first race but the championship that year. In 2003, he raced in the Jr. 80cc Shifter class finishing a close second, and at the end of that year made the transition from karts to cars by winning the Jim Russell Graduate Runoffs; racing in Formula Russell in 2004. That year, he went on to win the series championship; also participating in the Red Bull Driver Search. He then moved up to Pacific F2000 in 2005; finishing second overall as rookie of the year, also being chosen for the Team USA Scholarship, earning him a ride in the Formula Palmer Audi Autumn Trophy, in which he finished third. In 2006, he dominated the U.S. F2000 National Championship; winning the championship and 12 out of 14 races.

In recognition of his impressive 2006 performance, Hildebrand won the Gorsline Scholarship and was elected to the AARWBA All American Auto Racing First Team.

Hildebrand (inside) racing alongside teammate Andrew Prendeville in the 2008 Firestone Freedom 100
Hildebrand (inside) racing alongside teammate Andrew Prendeville in the 2008 Firestone Freedom 100

Atlantics and Indy Lights

For 2007, he moved to the Champ Car Atlantic series, driving for Newman Wachs Racing. He finished seventh in points and was the top US rookie in the series. After the season's conclusion he made 2 starts for RLR-Andersen Racing in the Indy Pro Series. Hildebrand then went on to contest the entire series schedule, which was renamed the Firestone Indy Lights Series, for RLR-Andersen in 2008.[1] He captured his first series win in the fourth race of the season at Kansas Speedway, his second start on an oval. He finished 5th overall in the 2008 championship.

For the 2009 season he signed with defending championship winning team AGR-AFS Racing,[2] and after winning four races and taking five pole positions, he eventually claimed the title at the penultimate round at Chicagoland. That year he also competed in the final round of the A1 Grand Prix series for A1 Team USA at Brands Hatch, finishing 4th in the Sprint race. He was again elected to the AARWBA All American Auto Racing First Team for 2009.

American Le Mans Series

American Le Mans Series' Genoa Racing signed Hildebrand to race a LMPC class car for 2010. He contested the 12 Hours of Sebring and the Long Beach Grand Prix.

Formula One

Hildebrand spent three days testing for the Force India Formula One team in December 2009, at the Jerez circuit, in a car shared with Paul di Resta.[3][4][5]

IndyCar

Hildebrand made his IndyCar Series debut in 2010, competing in two races for Dreyer & Reinbold Racing as a substitute driver for the injured Mike Conway. On Tuesday, December 14, 2010, it was announced that Hildebrand signed a multi–year contract to drive the No. 4 National Guard entry for Panther Racing, starting in 2011 after impressing the team during a test.[6]

Hildebrand driving for Panther Racing at the 2011 Indy Japan 300.
Hildebrand driving for Panther Racing at the 2011 Indy Japan 300.

Later in 2011, Hildebrand qualified for the Indianapolis 500, and was the most successful rookie during his premiere race. Hildebrand was able to lead at the halfway point for Panther Racing, and stayed on the lead lap for the entire race. This allowed him to take a gamble during his last pit stop, stretching out his fuel load to an eventual lead on the final lap. On the very last turn, he slid out of the racing lane and into the retaining wall while passing rapidly slowing Charlie Kimball, allowing Dan Wheldon to take the victory. Despite the damage to his car – including the loss of a wheel – Hildebrand retained enough speed to cross the finish line in second place.

On October 16, 2011, Hildebrand was involved in a 15-car chain reaction crash at Las Vegas Motor Speedway in the season-ending IZOD IndyCar World Championships. Hildebrand sustained an injured sternum and was transported by ground ambulance to a Las Vegas area hospital, where he was admitted for treatment. The crash claimed the life of two-time Indy winner Wheldon.[7][8]

Following a last-place finish in the 2013 Indianapolis 500, Hildebrand was released by Panther Racing.[9] He had announced earlier in the year that he would be running selected Formula DRIFT races as a teammate to Tyler McQuarrie.[10] In 2014, Hildebrand joined Ed Carpenter Racing for the Indianapolis 500, driving the No. 21.[11] On November 4, 2016, it was confirmed that Hildebrand will take over the Ed Carpenter Racing No. 21 car for the 2017 season, replacing Josef Newgarden.[12]

Personal

In 2006, Hildebrand graduated from Redwood High School in Larkspur, California as a National Merit Scholar with a 4.12 GPA. While in high school, he also played varsity baseball. He applied and was accepted by several top universities, including UCLA, Berkeley and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. M.I.T. granted a three-year deferral, but he eventually allowed it to lapse as he continued to pursue his racing career.[13][14]

Racing record

American open–wheel racing results

(key)

USF2000 National Championship

Year Entrant 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 Pos Points
2006 Cape Motorsports ATL1
1
ATL2
1
MDO1
1
MDO2
1
PIR1
1
PIR2
1
CLE1
1
CLE2
2
TOR1
1
TOR2
1
MDO3
1
MDO4
1
ROA1
13
ROA2
1
1st 361

Atlantic Championship

Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Rank Points
2006 Newman Wachs Racing LBH HOU MTY POR CLE1 CLE2 TOR EDM SJO DEN MTL ROA
Ret
43rd 2
2007 LVG
Ret
LBH
Ret
HOU
7
POR1
6
POR2
9
CLE
2
MTT
9
TOR
Ret
EDM1
Ret
EDM2
5
SJO
15
ROA
9
7th 140
2008 Genoa Racing LBH LS MTT EDM1 EDM2 ROA1 ROA2 TRR NJ UTA ATL
Ret
26th 7

Indy Lights

Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Rank Points
2007 RLR/Andersen Racing HMS STP1 STP2 INDY MIL IMS1 IMS2 IOW WGL1 WGL2 NSH MDO KTY SNM1
Ret
SNM2
Ret
CHI 37th 18
2008 HMS
10
STP1
5
STP2
2
KAN
1
INDY
24
MIL
5
IOW
8
WGL1
Ret
WGL2
9
NSH
4
MDO1
5
MDO2
6
KTY
18
SNM1
4
SNM2
4
CHI
Ret
5th 409
2009 AGR-AFS Racing STP1
3
STP2
Ret
LBH
1
KAN
14
INDY
2
MIL
2
IOW
6
WGL
1
TOR
2
EDM
1
KTY
Ret
MDO
3
SNM
1
CHI
5
HMS
2
1st 545

IndyCar Series

Year Team Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Rank Points
2010 Dreyer & Reinbold Racing Dallara
IR-05
Honda SAO STP ALA LBH KAN INDY TXS IOW WGL TOR EDM MDO
16
SNM
24
CHI KTY MOT HMS 35th 26
2011 Panther Racing STP
11
ALA
13
LBH
17
SAO
10
INDY
2
TXS
23
TXS
18
MIL
21
IOW
4
TOR
8
EDM
11
MDO
25
NHM
21
SNM
23
BAL
19
MOT
7
KTY
20
LVS1
C
14th 296
2012 Dallara DW12 Chevrolet STP
19
ALA
15
LBH
5
SAO
7
INDY
14
DET
14
TXS
5
MIL
22
IOW
22
TOR
7
EDM
21
MDO
9
SNM
8
BAL
12
FON
11
11th 294
2013 STP
19
ALA
17
LBH
5
SAO
15
INDY
33
DET DET TXS MIL IOW POC TOR TOR MDO 25th 112
Barracuda Racing Honda SNM
16
BAL HOU HOU FON
11
2014 Ed Carpenter Racing Chevrolet STP LBH ALA IMS INDY
10
DET DET TXS HOU HOU POC IOW TOR TOR MDO MIL SNM FON 26th 66
2015 CFH Racing STP NLA LBH ALA IMS
21
INDY
8
DET DET TXS TOR FON MIL IOW MDO POC SNM 31st 57
2016 Ed Carpenter Racing STP PHX LBH ALA IMS
22
INDY
6
DET DET RDA IOW TOR MDO POC TXS WGL SNM 23rd 84
2017 STP
13
LBH
11
ALA PHX
3
IMS
14
INDY
16
DET
17
DET
18
TEX
12
ROA
16
IOW
2
TOR
13
MDO
17
POC
19
GTW
18
WGL
15
SNM
14
15th 347
2018 Dreyer & Reinbold Racing STP PHX LBH ALA IMS INDY
11
DET DET TXS RDA IOW TOR MDO POC GTW POR SNM 33rd 38
2019 STP COA ALA LBH IMS INDY
20
DET DET TXS RDA TOR IOW MDO POC GTW POR LAG 33rd 20

* Season still in progress.

1 Race cancelled due to death of Dan Wheldon
Years Teams Races Poles Wins Podiums
(Non-win)
Top 10s
(Non-podium)
Indianapolis 500
Wins
Championships
8 5 56 0 0 3 14 0 0
** Podium (Non-win) indicates 2nd or 3rd place finishes.
*** Top 10s (Non-podium) indicates 4th through 10th place finishes.

Indianapolis 500

Year Chassis Engine Start Finish Team
2011 Dallara Honda 12 2 Panther Racing
2012 Dallara Chevrolet 18 14 Panther Racing
2013 Dallara Chevrolet 10 33 Panther Racing
2014 Dallara Chevrolet 9 10 Ed Carpenter Racing
2015 Dallara Chevrolet 10 8 CFH Racing
2016 Dallara Chevrolet 15 6 Ed Carpenter Racing
2017 Dallara Chevrolet 6 16 Ed Carpenter Racing
2018 Dallara Chevrolet 27 11 Dreyer & Reinbold Racing
2019 Dallara Chevrolet 21 20 Dreyer & Reinbold Racing

Complete American Le Mans Series results

Year Entrant Class Chassis Engine Tyres 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Rank Points
2010 Genoa Racing LMPC Oreca FLM09 Chevrolet 6.2L V8 M SEB
ovr:25
cls:2
LNB
ovr:7
cls:3
MON UTA LIM MID AME MOS PET 17th 36

Pikes Peak International Hill Climb

Year Car Time Pos. Class
Pos.
2018 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport 10:39.301 29th 2nd

References

  1. ^ Hildebrand Joins RLR/Andersen Racing Archived March 9, 2008, at the Wayback Machine, SpeedTV.com, March 5, 2008
  2. ^ DiZinno, Tony. Hildebrand joins AGR/AFS juggernaut Archived June 7, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Motorsport.com, November 13, 2008
  3. ^ "Rookietest Jerez: Analyse dag 1". MotorRacingBlog.nl
  4. ^ "Hildebrand and di Resta to test for Force India | joeblogsf1". Joesaward.wordpress.com. November 24, 2009. Retrieved February 10, 2017.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on July 23, 2011. Retrieved May 30, 2011.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 14, 2012. Retrieved January 12, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Dan Wheldon dies in huge crash at IndyCar finale". USA Today. October 16, 2011. Retrieved October 16, 2011.
  8. ^ "Dan Wheldon dies following IndyCar crash at Vegas". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. October 17, 2011. Retrieved October 17, 2011.
  9. ^ DiZinno, Tony (May 30, 2013). "Panther Racing terminates JR Hildebrand's contract". NBC Sports. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  10. ^ DiZinno, Tony (April 10, 2013). "JR Hildebrand will go drift racing later this year". NBC Sports. Retrieved May 31, 2013.
  11. ^ IndyCar (March 20, 2014). "Hildebrand To Compete In '500'". Indianapolis Motor Speedway. Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  12. ^ "Hildebrand confirmed as full-time Ed Carpenter driver". Motorsport.com. Motorsport Network. November 4, 2016. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  13. ^ "Famous people who didn't go to MIT" M.I.T. Admissions Office. 2011. Retrieved May 30, 2011.
  14. ^ Redwood High grad picks IRL over MIT Santa Rosa Press-Democrat. August 20, 2010. Retrieved May 30, 2011.

External links

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Raphael Matos
Firestone Indy Lights
Champion

2009
Succeeded by
Jean-Karl Vernay
Awards and achievements
Preceded by
Simona de Silvestro
Indianapolis 500
Rookie of the Year

2011
Succeeded by
Rubens Barrichello
This page was last edited on 28 October 2019, at 16:17
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