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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Iowa Cubs
Founded in 1969
Des Moines, Iowa
Iowa Cubs Logo.svg
IowaCubsCap.png
Team logoCap insignia
Class-level
CurrentTriple-A (1969–present)
Minor league affiliations
LeaguePacific Coast League (1998–present)
ConferenceAmerican Conference
DivisionNorthern Division
Previous leagues
American Association (1969–1997)
Major league affiliations
CurrentChicago Cubs (1981–present)
PreviousChicago White Sox (1976–1980)
Houston Astros (1975)
Chicago White Sox (1973–1974)
Oakland Athletics (1969–1972)
Minor league titles
League titles (1)1993
Conference titles (1)2004
Division titles (8)
  • 1973
  • 1993
  • 1997
  • 1998
  • 2001
  • 2004
  • 2008
  • 2019
Team data
NicknameIowa Cubs (1982–present)
Previous names
Iowa Oaks (1969–1981)
ColorsBlue, red, white
              
MascotCubbie Bear
BallparkPrincipal Park (2004–present)
Previous parks
Sec Taylor Stadium (1969–2004)
Owner(s)/
Operator(s)
Raccoon Baseball, Inc.
ManagerMarty Pevey
General ManagerSam Bernabe

The Iowa Cubs are a Minor League Baseball team of the Pacific Coast League (PCL) and the Triple-A affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. They are located in Des Moines, Iowa, and play their home games at Principal Park, which opened in 2004. The team was originally known as the Iowa Oaks when it was established as a member of the Triple-A American Association in 1969. The Cubs took on the moniker of their major league affiliate in 1982. They joined the PCL in 1998. Their only league title in franchise history is the 1993 American Association championship.

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Transcription

Contents

History

Iowa Oaks (1969–1981)

Iowa Oaks logo during White Sox affiliation
Iowa Oaks logo during White Sox affiliation

Triple-A Minor League Baseball came to Iowa's capital city in 1969, as the Iowa Oaks of the American Association began play as an affiliate of the Oakland Athletics.[1] They played their home games at Sec Taylor Stadium, which opened in 1947 and was located at the confluence of the Des Moines and Raccoon Rivers. Many future Major League Baseball stars such as sluggers Bill McNulty, Harold Baines, Pat Tabler, and 1971 Cy Young and MVP Award winning left-handed pitcher Vida Blue spent time with the Oaks. The A's farm club experienced winning seasons in 1970 and 1971, but third and second-place finishes kept them out of the playoffs.[2][3]

The Oaks became the top affiliate of the Chicago White Sox in 1973. They won the East Division that season with an 83–53 record, earning a spot in the best-of-seven American Association championship playoffs,[4] but they were defeated by the Tulsa Oilers, 4–3.[5] Manager Joe Sparks won the American Association Manager of the Year Award.[6] Oaks pitchers tossed two no-hitters in 1974, both in away games. The first was pitched by Joe Henderson against the Wichita Aeros on July 31.[7] The second occurred on August 25 when Butch Stinson no-hit the Indianapolis Indians.[7]

After one season as the Houston Astros' Triple-A club in 1975, Iowa returned to the White Sox organization in 1976. Despite a number of winning seasons, they failed to qualify for the postseason during the five years of their second affiliation with Chicago. On September 1, 1977, Chris Knapp and Fred Howard combined to no-hit the Omaha Royals.[7] On May 26, 1978, Jack Kucek tossed a no-hitter at Sec Taylor Stadium against the Oklahoma City 89ers.[7] Former St. Louis Cardinals manager Tony La Russa managed the Iowa Oaks in 1979 prior to becoming manager of the White Sox. Pitcher Dewey Robinson was selected for the 1979 American Association Most Valuable Pitcher Award after achieving a record of 13–7 and 9 saves with a 2.93 earned run average and 76 strikeouts.[6][8]

Iowa Cubs (1982–present)

In 1981, the team affiliated with the Chicago Cubs. After a final season as the Oaks, they adopted the nickname of their parent team in 1982 becoming the Iowa Cubs. The name is often shortened to "I-Cubs" to avoid confusion with the major league team. Iowa teams of the 1980s often finished high in the standings but were unable to qualify for the championship playoffs.[1] The only exceptions being in 1983 and 1984 when they earned spots in the semi-finals, but were eliminated by Denver both years.[5][9][10]

Cubbie Bear, the team mascot
Cubbie Bear, the team mascot

Members of the 1982 team garnered several league awards. Jay Howell, who struckout 139 batters on the way to a 13–4 record and a 2.36 ERA,[11] won the AA Most Valuable Pitcher Award.[6] Skipper Jim Napier was the league's Manager of the Year.[6] Outfielder Mel Hall was the Rookie of the Year after accruing a batting average of .329 while hitting 34 doubles and 32 home runs and driving in 125 runs.[6][12] Another Cub outfielder, Joe Carter won the 1983 Rookie of the Year Award after stealing 40 bases and hitting .307 with 22 homers.[6][13] In 1984, Reggie Patterson fired a no-hitter against the Omaha Royals on August 21.[7] Vince Cotroneo was the team's radio play-by-play announcer in 1988; he was named the National Association League's Minor League Announcer of the Year.

Sec Taylor Stadium was demolished after the 1991 season and a new facility of the same name was constructed on the site in time for the Cubs' 1992 season.[14]

Following a dismal 1992 campaign in which the Cubs went 51–92,[15] they rebounded to win the 1993 West Division title at 85–59.[16] They met the Nashville Sounds in the best-of-seven championship series. Leading the series 3–1, the Cubs lost two consecutive games to force a game seven.[17] In the final game, Nashville held a 2–1 lead from the third inning to the seventh before the Cubs tied the game necessitating extra innings.[17] An eleventh-inning walk-off home run by Iowa's Tuffy Rhodes ended the game and gave the Cubs their first league title.[5][17] Outfielder Eduardo Zambrano garnered the American Association Most Valuable Player Award after collecting 115 RBI and hitting 32 homers with a .303 average.[18] Iowa did not reach the playoffs again until 1997. They captured the West Division title with a 74–69 record before defeating the New Orleans Zephyrs in the semi-finals.[19] They were swept by the Buffalo Bisons, 3–0, in the championship round.[5]

The American Association, of which the Cubs had been members since their inaugural 1969 campaign, disbanded after the 1997 season. Its teams were absorbed by the two remaining Triple-A leagues—the International League and Pacific Coast League (PCL). The Cubs joined the PCL and won the American Conference Central Division title in 1998 with a 85–59 record.[20] In the American Conference series, they were bested by the New Orleans Zephyrs, 2–1, in a rain-shortened series.[21] Manager Terry Kennedy won the Pacific Coast League Manager of the Year Award.[22] Brett Dolan called Iowa games on the radio in 1998 and 1999 before being hired by the Houston Astros. Dolan was replaced by Dave Raymond, who broadcast games from 2000 to 2004 before going on to work for several major league teams. Former Chicago Cubs manager and Iowa native Bruce Kimm managed the I-Cubs from 2001 to 2002. He led them to the 2001 division title (83–60),[23] but they were again eliminated by New Orleans in the conference series.[21]

A Cubs game at Principal Park in 2014
A Cubs game at Principal Park in 2014

Mike Quade, former manager of the Chicago Cubs, managed Iowa from 2003 to 2006. Playing at the renamed Principal Park, the Cubs ended the 2004 season at 79–64 giving them another division title.[24] This time, they defeated the Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2, to win the American Conference championship.[21] In the best-of-five Pacific Coast League championship series, they lost to the Sacramento River Cats, 3–0.[21] In 2007, catcher Geovany Soto, with a .353 average, 26 home runs, and 109 RBI, won the PCL Most Valuable Player Award.[22][25] Led by PCL Manager of the Year Pat Listach,[22] the 2008 Cubs won the American Conference North Division (83–59),[26] but were beaten in the conference series by Oklahoma, 3–2.[21]

In 2010, the team was managed by Baseball Hall of Fame inductee Ryne Sandberg who was also selected as the league's Manager of the Year.[22] First baseman Bryan LaHair won the 2010 PCL MVP Award with his .331 average, 38 homers, and 109 RBI.[22][27] On May 7, 2014, Iowa starter Chris Rusin pitched a no-hitter against the New Orleans Zephyrs.[28] In May 2014, Manny Ramirez signed a contract as a part-time player/coach for the I-Cubs. In 2015, right-hander Carlos Pimentel won the PCL Pitcher of the Year Award after achieving a 12–6 record with 118 strikeouts and a 2.95 ERA.[22][29] The Cubs returned to the postseason in 2019 having won the division 75–65,[30] but were eliminated by the Round Rock Express in the American Conference series.[31]

Many future Cubs stars have played in Des Moines before they were called up to Wrigley Field. Some notable I-Cubs alumni include Greg Maddux, Rafael Palmeiro, Mark Grace, Doug Glanville, Joe Carter, Corey Patterson, Carlos Zambrano, Kyle Farnsworth, Kerry Wood, Steve Trachsel, Tuffy Rhodes, Bruce Kimm, Shawon Dunston, Héctor Villanueva, Mark Prior, Sam Fuld, John Grabow, and Rod Beck. Wood and Prior both made rehabilitation starts for the I-Cubs in 2004 and 2005 before returning to the Chicago Cubs' active roster, and many Cubs players such as Derrek Lee, Daryle Ward, Alfonso Soriano, and Ryan Dempster have also made stops in Des Moines for rehab purposes. Many Cubs stars such as Kris Bryant, Kyle Schwarber, Anthony Rizzo, and Javier Baez made also stops in Iowa.

Season-by-season results

Finish The team's final position in the divisional standings
GB Games behind the team that finished in first place in the division that season
Class champions Class champions (1969–present)
League champions League champions (1969–present)
§ Conference champions (1998–present)
* Division champions (1970–present)
^ Postseason berth (1969–1997)
Season League Division Regular season Postseason MLB affiliate
Finish Wins Losses Win % GB
1969 AA 4th (tie) 62 78 .443 23 Oakland Athletics
1970 AA East 2nd 70 68 .507 3 Oakland Athletics
1971 AA East 2nd 71 69 .507 1​12 Oakland Athletics
1972 AA East 3rd 62 78 .443 21 Oakland Athletics
1973* AA East 1st 83 53 .610 Won East Division title
Lost AA championship vs Tulsa Oilers, 4–3
Chicago White Sox
1974 AA East 2nd 74 62 .544 12 Chicago White Sox
1975 AA East 4th 56 79 .415 2​12 Houston Astros
1976 AA East 2nd 68 68 .500 10 Chicago White Sox
1977 AA East 4th 61 75 .449 1​12 Chicago White Sox
1978 AA East 4th 66 70 .485 1​12 Chicago White Sox
1979 AA East 3rd 69 67 .507 9 Chicago White Sox
1980 AA East 3rd 59 77 .434 16 Chicago White Sox
1981 AA East 4th 53 82 .393 1​12 Chicago Cubs
1982 AA East 2nd (tie) 73 62 .541 12 Chicago Cubs
1983^ AA East 2nd 71 65 .522 12 Lost semi-finals vs Denver Bears, 3–1 Chicago Cubs
1984^ AA 2nd 80 74 .519 11 Lost semi-finals vs Denver Zephyrs, 3–1 Chicago Cubs
1985 AA West 4th 66 75 .468 1​12 Chicago Cubs
1986 AA West 2nd 74 68 .521 2 Chicago Cubs
1987 AA 6th 64 74 .464 14 Chicago Cubs
1988 AA West 2nd 78 64 .549 3 Chicago Cubs
1989 AA West 3rd 62 82 .431 11 Chicago Cubs
1990 AA West 2nd 72 74 .493 14 Chicago Cubs
1991 AA West 2nd 78 66 .542 1 Chicago Cubs
1992 AA West 4th 51 92 .357 2​12 Chicago Cubs
1993*League champions AA West 1st 85 59 .590 Won West Division title
Won AA championship vs Nashville Sounds, 4–3
Chicago Cubs
1994 AA 5th 69 74 .483 17 Chicago Cubs
1995 AA 5th 69 74 .483 1​12 Chicago Cubs
1996 AA West 3rd 64 78 .451 14 Chicago Cubs
1997* AA West 1st 74 69 .517 Won West Division title
Won semi-finals vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 3–0
Lost AA championship vs Buffalo Bisons, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
1998* PCL American Central 1st 85 59 .590 Won American Central Division title
Lost American Conference title vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 2–1
Chicago Cubs
1999 PCL American Midwest 4th 65 76 .461 16 Chicago Cubs
2000 PCL American Central 4th 57 87 .396 29 Chicago Cubs
2001* PCL American Central 1st 83 60 .580 Won American Central Division title
Lost American Conference title vs New Orleans Zephyrs, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
2002 PCL American Central 3rd 71 73 .493 7 Chicago Cubs
2003 PCL American Central 3rd 70 72 .493 3 Chicago Cubs
2004 PCL American Central 1st 79 64 .552 Won American Central Division title
Won American Conference title vs Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2
Lost PCL championship vs Sacramento River Cats, 3–0
Chicago Cubs
2005 PCL American North 4th 64 75 .460 12 Chicago Cubs
2006 PCL American North 1st (tie) 76 68 .528 Chicago Cubs
2007 PCL American North 2nd 76 65 .549 10 Chicago Cubs
2008* PCL American North 1st 83 57 .593 Won American North Division title
Lost American Conference title vs Oklahoma RedHawks, 3–2
Chicago Cubs
2009 PCL American North 3rd 72 72 .500 5 Chicago Cubs
2010 PCL American North 1st (tie) 82 62 .569 Chicago Cubs
2011 PCL American North 4th 66 77 .462 1​12 Chicago Cubs
2012 PCL American North 4th 53 87 .379 28 Chicago Cubs
2013 PCL American North 3rd 65 75 .464 2 Chicago Cubs
2014 PCL American North 2nd (tie) 74 70 .514 12 Chicago Cubs
2015 PCL American North 2nd (tie) 80 64 .556 6 Chicago Cubs
2016 PCL American North 3rd 67 76 .469 15 Chicago Cubs
2017 PCL American North 4th 67 72 .482 14 Chicago Cubs
2018 PCL American North 4th 50 88 .362 24 Chicago Cubs
2019* PCL American North 1st 75 65 .536 Won American North Division title
Lost American Conference title vs Round Rock Express, 3–2
Chicago Cubs
Totals Wins Losses Win % Championships
American Association regular season 1,984 2,076 .489
Pacific Coast League regular season 1,560 1,564 .499
Postseason 20 32 .385 1993 AA
All-time regular and postseason 3,544 3,640 .493

Roster

Iowa Cubs roster
Players Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches


Injury icon 2.svg 7-day injured list
* On Chicago Cubs 40-man roster
# Rehab assignment
∞ Reserve list
‡ Restricted list
§ Suspended list
† Temporary inactive list
Roster updated September 4, 2019
Transactions
→ More rosters: MiLB • Pacific Coast League
Chicago Cubs minor league players

References

  1. ^ a b "Des Moines, Iowa Encyclopedia". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  2. ^ "1970 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  3. ^ "1971 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  4. ^ "1973 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d "American Association Playoff Results". Triple-A Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "American Association Special Award Winners". Triple-A Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  7. ^ a b c d e McGill, Chuck. "Minor League No-Hitters". Baseball-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  8. ^ "Dewey Robinson Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  9. ^ "1983 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  10. ^ "1984 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  11. ^ "Jay Howell Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  12. ^ "Mel Hall Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  13. ^ "Joe Carter Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  14. ^ "Iowa Cubs: Ballpark". Minor League Baseball. January 12, 2006. Retrieved March 11, 2007.
  15. ^ "1992 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  16. ^ "1993 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  17. ^ a b c Taft, Larry (September 16, 1993). "Iowa Ends Sounds' Championship Charge". The Tennessean. Nashville. p. 1C. Retrieved April 26, 2019.
  18. ^ "Eddie Zambrano Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  19. ^ "1997 American Association". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  20. ^ "1998 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  21. ^ a b c d e "Past Champions". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  22. ^ a b c d e f "Pacific Coast League Award Winners". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  23. ^ "2001 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  24. ^ "2004 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  25. ^ "Geovany Soto Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  26. ^ "2008 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  27. ^ "Bryan LaHair Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  28. ^ Dykstra, Sam (May 7, 2014). "Rusin Tosses First PCL No-hitter Since '09". Minor League Baseball. Retrieved August 12, 2015.
  29. ^ "Carlos Pimentel Minor League Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 12, 2019.
  30. ^ "2019 Pacific Coast League". Baseball-Reference. Sports Reference. Retrieved October 11, 2019.
  31. ^ "2019 Pacific Coast League Playoffs". Pacific Coast League. Minor League Baseball. Retrieved October 11, 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 14 October 2019, at 10:59
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