To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Franklin Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Franklin Township, New Jersey
Township of Franklin
Franklin Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Franklin Township highlighted in Gloucester County. Inset map: Gloucester County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Franklin Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Franklin Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey
Franklin Township is located in Gloucester County, New Jersey
Franklin Township
Franklin Township
Location in Gloucester County
Franklin Township is located in New Jersey
Franklin Township
Franklin Township
Location in New Jersey
Franklin Township is located in the United States
Franklin Township
Franklin Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 39°35′56″N 75°01′15″W / 39.59884°N 75.020874°W / 39.59884; -75.020874[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Gloucester
IncorporatedJanuary 27, 1820
Named forBenjamin Franklin
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorJohn "Jake" Bruno (R, term ends December 31, 2020)[3][4]
 • AdministratorNancy K. Brent[5]
 • Municipal clerkBarbara Freijomil[6]
Area
 • Total56.39 sq mi (146.04 km2)
 • Land55.83 sq mi (144.60 km2)
 • Water0.56 sq mi (1.44 km2)  0.99%
Area rank26th of 565 in state
1st of 24 in county[1]
Elevation105 ft (32 m)
Population
 • Total16,820
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
16,300
 • Rank149th of 566 in state
6th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density300.9/sq mi (116.2/km2)
 • Density rank478th of 566 in state
21st of 24 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)856[16]
FIPS code3401524840[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0882138[1][19]
Websitewww.franklintownship.com

Franklin Township is a township in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 16,820,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 1,354 (+8.8%) from the 15,466 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 984 (+6.8%) from the 14,482 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Franklin Township was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 27, 1820, from portions of Greenwich Township and Woolwich Township. Parts of the township have been taken to form Clayton Township (February 5, 1858) and Newfield (March 8, 1924).[21] The township was named for Benjamin Franklin.[22][23]

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 56.39 square miles (146.04 km2), including 55.83 square miles (144.60 km2) of land and 0.56 square miles (1.44 km2) of water (0.99%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Blue Bell, Downstown, Forest Grove. Franklinville, Fries Mills, Iona, Janvier, Lake, Malaga, Marsh Lake, Piney Hollow, Plainville, Star Cross and Porchtown.[24]

The township borders the municipalities of Clayton, Elk Township, Monroe Township and Newfield in Gloucester County; Buena and Buena Vista Township in Atlantic County; Vineland in Cumberland County; and Pittsgrove Township and Upper Pittsgrove Township in Salem County.[25][26]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
18201,137
18301,57438.4%
18402,07732.0%
18502,98443.7%
18601,778*−40.4%
18702,18823.1%
18802,48013.3%
18902,021−18.5%
19002,25211.4%
19102,60315.6%
19203,44832.5%
19303,563*3.3%
19403,464−2.8%
19505,05646.0%
19607,45147.4%
19708,99020.7%
198012,39637.9%
199014,48216.8%
200015,4666.8%
201016,8208.8%
2019 (est.)16,300[12][27][28]−3.1%
Population sources: 1820-2000[29]
1820-1920[30] 1840[31] 1850-1870[32]
1850[33] 1870[34] 1880-1890[35]
1890-1910[36] 1910-1930[37]
1930-1990[38] 2000[39][40] 2010[9][10][11]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[21]

Census 2010

The 2010 United States Census counted 16,820 people, 5,849 households, and 4,562 families in the township. The population density was 300.9 inhabitants per square mile (116.2/km2). There were 6,104 housing units at an average density of 109.2 per square mile (42.2/km2). The racial makeup was 88.44% (14,876) White, 7.18% (1,208) Black or African American, 0.20% (34) Native American, 1.27% (213) Asian, 0.03% (5) Pacific Islander, 1.03% (174) from other races, and 1.84% (310) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.49% (755) of the population.[9]

Of the 5,849 households, 33.6% had children under the age of 18; 61.5% were married couples living together; 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present and 22.0% were non-families. Of all households, 16.9% were made up of individuals and 6.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.23.[9]

24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 25.1% from 25 to 44, 31.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.0 years. For every 100 females, the population had 100.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 97.5 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $74,327 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,247) and the median family income was $80,667 (+/- $7,344). Males had a median income of $51,425 (+/- $3,105) versus $42,297 (+/- $2,605) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,141 (+/- $3,019). About 4.7% of families and 7.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.9% of those under age 18 and 15.2% of those age 65 or over.[41]

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 15,466 people, 5,225 households, and 4,190 families residing in the township. The population density was 276.1 people per square mile (106.6/km2). There were 5,461 housing units at an average density of 97.5 per square mile (37.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.22% White, 6.66% African American, 0.31% Native American, 0.41% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.25% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.51% of the population.[39][40]

There were 5,225 households, out of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.8% were non-families. 15.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.94 and the average family size was 3.29.[39][40]

In the township the population was spread out, with 27.7% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 23.5% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.[39][40]

The median income for a household in the township was $55,169, and the median income for a family was $60,518. Males had a median income of $41,159 versus $27,538 for females. The per capita income for the township was $20,277. About 3.5% of families and 5.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.8% of those under age 18 and 6.4% of those age 65 or over.[39][40]

Government

Local government

Franklin Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[42] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][43] At an annual reorganization meeting, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2020, the Franklin Township Committee is comprised of Mayor John "Jake" Bruno (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2021; term as mayor ends 2020), Deputy Mayor Heather Flaim (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2020), David P. Deegan Jr. (R, 2022), Timothy Doyle (R, 2020; appointed to serve an unexpired term) and Mary Petsch-Wilson (R, 2022).[3][44][45][46][47][48]

In January 2020, Timothy Doyle was chosen from three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by Leah Vasallo until she resigned from office the previous month.[49]

Republican Heather Flaim was appointed to fill the seat expiring in December 2018 that became vacant following the death of Ed Leopardi in September 2016; a judge ruled in May 2017 that Flaim could take the seat in a ruling in a case in which the local Democratic municipal committee claimed that it had submitted a list of three candidates to succeed Leopardi, which the township claims it never received.[50] Flaim won a full three-year term in the November 2017 general election, while Democrat Charles F. Pluta was elected to serve the balance of Leopardi's term of office.[48]

Federal, state and county representation

Franklin Township is located in the 2nd Congressional District[51] and is part of New Jersey's 3rd state legislative district.[10][52][53] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Franklin Township had been in the 4th state legislative district.[54]

For the 116th United States Congress, New Jersey's Second Congressional District is represented by Jeff Van Drew (R, Dennis Township).[55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (Paramus, term ends 2025).[57][58]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 3rd Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Stephen M. Sweeney (D, West Deptford Township) and in the General Assembly by John J. Burzichelli (D, Paulsboro) and Adam Taliaferro (D, Woolwich Township).[59][60]

Gloucester County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, whose seven members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis in partisan elections, with two or three seats coming up for election each year. At a reorganization meeting held each January, the Board selects a Freeholder Director and a Deputy Freeholder Director from among its members. As of 2020, Gloucester County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Robert M. Damminger (D, West Deptford Township; 2021),[61] Deputy Freeholder Director Frank J. DiMarco (D, Deptford Township; 2022),[62] Lyman J. Barnes (D, Logan Township; 2020),[63] Daniel Christy (D, Washington Township; 2022),[64] Jim Jefferson (D, Woodbury; 2020),[65] Jim Lavender (D, Woolwich Township; 2021),[66] and Heather Simmons (D, Glassboro; 2020).[67][68]

Constitutional officers elected countywide are: County Clerk James N. Hogan (D, Franklinville in Franklin Township; 5-year term ends 2022),[69][70][71] Sheriff Carmel Morina (D, Greenwich Township; 3-year term ends 2021)[72][73][74] and Surrogate Giuseppe "Joe" Chila (D, Woolwich Township; 5-year term ends 2022).[75][76][77][71][78][74]

Politics

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 10,760 registered voters in Franklin, of which 2,885 (26.8%) were registered as Democrats, 2,422 (22.5%) were registered as Republicans and 5,444 (50.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 9 voters registered to other parties.[79]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 50.9% of the vote (3,782 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 47.8% (3,553 votes), and other candidates with 1.4% (101 votes), among the 7,492 ballots cast by the township's 11,180 registered voters (56 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 67.0%.[80][81] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.3% of the vote (4,065 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 46.0% (3,646 votes) and other candidates with 1.7% (131 votes), among the 7,923 ballots cast by the township's 11,085 registered voters, for a turnout of 71.5%.[82] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 49.5% of the vote (3,503 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 48.7% (3,443 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (92 votes), among the 7,073 ballots cast by the township's 9,870 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 71.7.[83]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.2% of the vote (1,138 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 37.0% (677 votes), and other candidates with 0.8% (14 votes), among the 1,915 ballots cast by the township's 3,654 registered voters (86 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 52.4%.[84][85] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 49.2% of the vote (2,445 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 40.2% (1,998 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.4% (417 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (35 votes), among the 4,969 ballots cast by the township's 11,042 registered voters, yielding a 45.0% turnout.[86]

Public safety

Franklin Township is served by the Franklin Township Police Department, along with five volunteer fire companies and the County-run Emergency Medical Services. Serving are Forest Grove Volunteer Fire Company (founded 1949), Franklinville Volunteer Fire Company, Janvier Volunteer Fire Company (founded 1946), Malaga Volunteer Fire Company, Star Cross Volunteer Fire Company.[87] Since 2017, Gloucester County EMS provides emergency medical services for the whole township, after the governing body questioned the ability of the Township of Franklin Ambulance Corps to respond to calls with volunteers.[88]

Education

The Franklin Township Public Schools serve students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade.[89] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 1,408 students and 114.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1.[90] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[91]) are Mary F. Janvier Elementary School[92] with 597 students in grades K-2, Main Road School[93] with 394 students in grades 3-4 and Caroline L. Reutter School[94] with 406 students in grades 5–6.[95][96] Students from Newfield attend the Franklin Township district's schools as part of a sending/receiving relationship in which Newfield accounts for about 100 of the nearly 1,400 students in the district.[97]

For seventh through twelfth grades, students attend the Delsea Regional School District, which serves students from both Elk Township and Franklin Township.[98][99] Students from Newfield attend the district as part of a sending/receiving relationship begun in September 2010 after Newfield ended its prior relationship with the Buena Regional School District.[100] As of the 2018–19 school year, the regional high school district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 1,661 students and 123.8 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.4:1.[101] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[102]) are Delsea Regional Middle School[103] with 563 students in grades 7 and 8, and Delsea Regional High School[104] with 1,047 students in grades 9 - 12.[105][106] The seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated to the constituent municipalities based on population, with seven seats assigned to Franklin Township.[107]

The New Jersey Department of Education considered a vote by the Franklin Township Board of Education in June 2010 requesting that the district withdraw from the Delsea Regional School District, which would require that the Delsea region be dissolved as about 80% of the regional district's students come from Franklin. With the withdrawal of Franklin Township, two options being considered were to either have Franklin and Elk Townships create a new regional district with Newfield students attending on a send-receive basis, or having Franklin Township establish its own PreK-12 district which would receive students from both Elk Township and Newfield.[108][109]

Students from across the county are eligible to apply to attend Gloucester County Institute of Technology, a four-year high school in Deptford Township that provides technical and vocational education. As a public school, students do not pay tuition to attend the school.[110]

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden operates St. Michael the Archangel Regional School in Clayton; Nativity Church in Franklinville? is one of the sending parishes.[111] Our Lady of Mercy Academy is a college preparatory, all-girls Catholic high school founded in 1962 by the Daughters of Our Lady of Mercy and operated under the supervision of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[112]

Transportation

Route 55 northbound at US 40 in Franklin Township
Route 55 northbound at US 40 in Franklin Township

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 177.39 miles (285.48 km) of roadways, of which 118.84 miles (191.25 km) were maintained by the municipality, 39.04 miles (62.83 km) by Gloucester County and 19.51 miles (31.40 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[113]

U.S. Route 40[114] passes through the southern area while both Route 47[115] and the Route 55 freeway[116] both pass through the eastern area.

The county roads that pass through include CR 538, CR 555 and CR 557.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on service between Cape May and Philadelphia on the 313 and between Millville and Philadelphia on the 408 routes.[117][118]

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Franklin Township include:

Wineries

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Township Committee, Franklin Township. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020. As of date accessed, Philip Koury -- who is mayor of Franklin Township, Hunterdon County, New Jersey -- is incorrectly listed as mayor.
  5. ^ Township Administrator, Franklin Township. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  6. ^ Municipal Clerk, Franklin Township. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 24.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Franklin, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Franklin township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Franklin township Archived 2015-05-27 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  12. ^ a b QuickFacts for Franklin township, Gloucester County, New Jersey; Gloucester County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Franklinville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Franklinville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Geographic codes for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed September 1, 2019.
  19. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  21. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 138. Accessed October 25, 2012.
  22. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 31, 2015.
  23. ^ History Archived 2016-06-05 at the Wayback Machine The Franklinville Inn. Accessed August 31, 2015. "In 1820 the Township of Franklin was formed. The first town meeting was held in that hotel which was then known as Cake's Tavern.... The village of Little Ease evolved into the Town of Franklinville. The origin of this name is uncertain; however, many believe Benjamin Franklin's influence in the area, as a result of his trips to Cape May, may have been instrumental in naming the town."
  24. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed April 28, 2015.
  25. ^ Municipalities within Gloucester County, NJ, Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  26. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  27. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  28. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  29. ^ Barnett, Bob. "Population Data for Gloucester County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  30. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  31. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 232, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  32. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 257, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed September 8, 2013. "Franklin township was formed in 1820 from Greenwich and Woolwich townships. Population in 1850, 2,984; in 1860, 1,778; and in 1870, 2,188."
  33. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 138. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  34. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 258. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  35. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 98. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  36. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  37. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 716. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  38. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  39. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Franklin township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Archived 2007-07-11 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  40. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Franklin township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  41. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Franklin township, Gloucester County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at Archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  42. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  43. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 3, 2015.
  44. ^ 2019 Municipal Data Sheet, Franklin Township. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  45. ^ Gloucester County 2020 Official Directory, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  46. ^ General Election November 5, 2019 Summary Report Unofficial Results, Gloucester County, New Jersey Clerk, November 12, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  47. ^ General Election November 6, 2018 Summary Report Unofficial Results, Gloucester County, New Jersey Clerk, November 12, 2018. Accessed January 1, 2019.
  48. ^ a b General Election November 7, 2017 Summary Report Unofficial Results, Gloucester County, New Jersey Clerk, November 14, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  49. ^ Resignation Letters, OPRAmachine, December 20, 2019. accessed April 1, 2020.
  50. ^ Gray, Matt. "Judge rules resident can fill vacant township committee seat", NJ Advance Media for NJ.com, May 31, 2017. Accessed September 19, 2018. "The township committee appointed Heather Flaim to fill the seat in October, but Leopardi's wife, Rene' Pistilli-Leopardi, and the Democratic Executive Committee of Franklin Township sued to block the move, saying the committee had not selected one of three replacements the township Democratic party had submitted. Township officials responded that they had not received the list."
  51. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  52. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  53. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  54. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government Archived 2013-06-04 at the Wayback Machine, p. 57, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed May 22, 2015.
  55. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  56. ^ About Cory Booker, United States Senate. Accessed January 26, 2015. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  57. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "He currently lives in Paramus and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  58. ^ Senators of the 116th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed April 17, 2019. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  59. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2018.
  60. ^ District 3 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  61. ^ Robert M. Damminger, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  62. ^ Frank J. DiMarco, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  63. ^ Lyman Barnes, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  64. ^ Daniel Christy, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  65. ^ Jim Jefferson, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  66. ^ Jim Lavender, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  67. ^ Heather Simmons, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  68. ^ Board of Freeholders, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  69. ^ James N. Hogan, Gloucester County. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  70. ^ Members List: Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  71. ^ a b 2017 Gloucester County Election Results, Office of the Gloucester County Clerk. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  72. ^ Sheriff Carmel M. Morina, Gloucester County. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  73. ^ Members List: Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  74. ^ a b 2018 Gloucester County Election Results, Office of the Gloucester County Clerk. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  75. ^ Surrogate Giuseppe Chila, Gloucester County. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  76. ^ Members List: Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  77. ^ Row Officers, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  78. ^ Helene Reed Dies, New Jersey Globe, April 28, 2018. Accessed February 11, 2020.
  79. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Gloucester, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  80. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Gloucester County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  81. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Gloucester County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  82. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  83. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Gloucester County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  84. ^ "Governor - Gloucester County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  85. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Gloucester County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  86. ^ 2009 Governor: Gloucester County Archived 2012-10-17 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  87. ^ Fire Departments, Franklin Township. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  88. ^ Gray, Matt. "Franklin Twp. votes to join Gloucester County EMS", NJ.com, February 10, 2017. Accessed May 25, 2017. "The township has agreed to join Gloucester County EMS. The township committee voted Thursday night to approve the move, making it the 18th municipality to join the county force. The county has provided EMS service to the township under a shared services agreement since September as a result of concerns about the local volunteer service's ability to respond to calls."
  89. ^ Township of Franklin Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Franklin Township Public Schools. Accessed May 12, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre Kindergarten through six in the Township of Franklin School District. Composition: The Township of Franklin School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Franklin Township."
  90. ^ District information for Township Of Franklin School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  91. ^ School Data for the Franklin Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  92. ^ Mary F. Janvier Elementary School, Township of Franklin Public Schools. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  93. ^ Main Road School, Township of Franklin Public Schools. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  94. ^ Caroline L. Reutter School, Township of Franklin Public Schools. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  95. ^ Schools, Township of Franklin Public Schools. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  96. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Franklin Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  97. ^ Township of Franklin Public School District 2015 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed May 12, 2020. "The Township of Franklin Public School District, covering 56 square miles, is located in the southeast corner of Gloucester County. Our schools have an enrollment of approximately 1425 and service grades K-6 and a Pre-School Disabilities program. The enrollment includes nearly 100 students from the Newfield School District."
  98. ^ Delsea Regional Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Delsea Regional School District. Accessed May 12, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades 7 through 12 in the Delsea Regional High School District. Composition: The Delsea Regional High School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Elk Township and Franklin Township."
  99. ^ 2019-2020 School Profile, Delsea Regional High School. Accessed May 12, 2020. "Delsea Regional High School serves the students of Franklin, Elk, and Newfield Townships."
  100. ^ Romalino, Carly. "State OKs Newfield's break with Buena district", The Gloucester County Times, June 17, 2009. Accessed December 24, 2014. "In a phase-in process, according to Delsea Regional School District Superintendent Frank Borelli, Delsea schools will first accept Newfield students entering grades seven and nine in September 2010. Students entering grades 10, 11 and 12 as of September 2010 would continue to be educated at Buena High School."
  101. ^ District information for Delsea Regional High School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  102. ^ School Data for the Delsea Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  103. ^ Delsea Regional Middle School, Delsea Regional School District. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  104. ^ Delsea Regional High School, Delsea Regional School District. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  105. ^ Schools, Delsea Regional School District. Accessed May 12, 2020.
  106. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Delsea Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  107. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report of the Delsea Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education, for year ending June 30, 2018. Accessed April 1, 2020. "The nine-member Board of Education is an elected body consisting of seven representatives from Franklin Township and two from Elk Township.... The Delsea Regional High School District is a Type II district located in the County of Gloucester, State of New Jersey. As a Type II District, the School District functions independently through a Board of Education. The Board is comprised of nine members elected to three-year terms."
  108. ^ Bumpus, Robert L. "Report of the Interim Executive County Superintendent of Schools on the Withdrawal of Franklin Township School District from Delsea Regional School District, a Limited Purpose Regional School District"[permanent dead link], New Jersey Department of Education, March 30, 2012. Accessed September 8, 2013.
  109. ^ Cooney, Joe. "Vote could end Delsea district; Franklin board seeks K-12 system", Asbury Park Press, July 13, 2012. Accessed December 24, 2014. "Franklin — The township's school board is seeking approval for a referendum that could lead to dissolution of the Delsea Regional School District. Franklin and Elk currently make up the regional district for students in grades 7 to 12. If a vote takes place, residents in those communities would decide on whether to create a new district for both municipalities' students in prekindergarten through 12th grade.... Newfield, which previously sent its kids to Buena Regional schools, now sends its students to Franklin and Delsea."
  110. ^ Admissions, Gloucester County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 7, 2019. "There is no charge to attend. GCIT is a public school.... GCIT is the vocational-technical school for Gloucester County residents. You must live in Gloucester County to apply and attend."
  111. ^ Giordano, Rita (September 6, 2008). "After much work, newly merged school opens in Clayton". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  112. ^ Catholic Schools Listing, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed October 8, 2017.
  113. ^ Gloucester County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  114. ^ U.S. Route 40 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated June 2017. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  115. ^ Route 47 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated April 2014. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  116. ^ Route 55 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, updated March 2017. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  117. ^ Gloucester County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed November 7, 2012.
  118. ^ Gloucester County's Transit Guide, Gloucester County, New Jersey. Accessed November 7, 2019.
  119. ^ Megerian, Chris. "Republican Domenick DiCicco took Assemby seat in heavy Democratic district with imaginative advertising", NJ.com, January 15, 2010. Accessed April 28, 2015. "That Republican is Domenick DiCicco, a 46-year-old lawyer and first-time candidate from Gloucester County's Franklin Township."
  120. ^ Hagenmayer, S. Joseph. "Jay Dinshah, 66, American Vegan Society Leader", The Philadelphia Inquirer, June 15, 2000, copied at International Vegetarian Union. Accessed May 25, 2017. "H. Jay Dinshah, 66, who as the leader of the American Vegan Society was an advocate for life without violence toward animals or humans, died on June 8, apparently from a heart attack while working in his office in Malaga, New Jersey.... A lifelong Malaga resident, Mr. Dinshah founded the American Vegan Society in 1960 and was its president for 40 years."
  121. ^ Carchidi, Sam. "Ed Keegan, former Phillie and Haddonfield High star, dies at 75", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 22, 2014. Accessed August 9, 2018. "Mr. Keegan spent most of his adult life living in Malaga, N.J., and helped coach in local Little Leagues."
  122. ^ Coen, Jon. "Franklinville native Eliot 'The Fire' Marshall looks to ignite UFC career on Saturday", The Press of Atlantic City, September 17, 2009. Accessed May 25, 2017. "Marshall, a Franklinville native who now lives in Boulder, Colo., will fight Jason Brilz on the Ultimate Fighting Championship 103 undercard in Dallas."

External links

This page was last edited on 30 December 2020, at 08:10
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.