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Inseparable (album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Inseparable
Natalie Cole inseparable.jpg
Studio album by Natalie Cole
Released May 11, 1975
Recorded 1974–75
Studio Curtom Studios
Universal Recording Studios
Paragon Studios
(Chicago, Illinois)
Genre
Length 29:54
Label Capitol
Producer
Natalie Cole chronology
Inseparable
(1975)
Natalie
(1976)

Inseparable is the 1975 debut studio album by American singer Natalie Cole, released on May 11, 1975 by Capitol Records. The album became her first gold-certified album and spawned the number-one R&B hits "This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)" and "Inseparable". The hit album and its singles earned Cole two Grammy Awards including Best New Artist.

History

By 1974, Natalie Cole, the daughter of legendary jazz/pop crooner Nat King Cole, was struggling to get her own music career off the ground. Ever since she had started performing at clubs and festivals, Cole had tried to forge her own path away from the one that several of her father's fans thought she would turn to. Cole refused to record jazz material in fear she would be accused of riding her father's coattails. A longtime fan of soul and blues singers such as Janis Joplin and Aretha Franklin, Cole had instead inspired to follow in their footsteps. After performing at one club, she was spotted by musicians Chuck Jackson (step-brother of Jesse Jackson) and Marvin Yancy, who was shopping songs that had been turned down by Franklin herself. Cole, Yancy and Jackson recorded demos for songs that later led to Cole being signed to her father's label, Capitol Records.

Release and reaction

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic4.5/5 stars [1]
Robert ChristgauB [2]
Rolling Stone(favorable) [3]

Released in the spring of 1975, Inseparable shot to the top of the R&B album charts and was also a top ten hit on the Billboard pop album charts sparked by the album's first single, "This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)". The song's Franklin-inspired production's catchy melodies and hooks helped to make it a number-one hit on the Hot Soul Singles chart while also reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100. The title track also became a hit reaching number-one on the R&B chart while reaching number thirty-two on the Billboard Hot 100. Altogether, the album went gold selling over a million copies and helping Cole win two Grammy Awards including Best New Artist and Best Female R&B Vocal Performance, where she broke the winning streak set by Aretha Franklin, who had won the award eight years in a row. (For a time before Cole's win, the award was nicknamed The Aretha Award.) The album's success was the beginning of Cole's mid-1970s successes, as an R&B star releasing five gold albums and two platinum albums during her Capitol tenure.

Track listing

All tracks written by Chuck Jackson and Marvin Yancy, except where noted.

Side one
No.TitleLength
1."Needing You"2:45
2."Joey"2:57
3."Inseparable"2:26
4."I Can't Say No"3:30
5."This Will Be (An Everlasting Love)"2:50
Side two
No.TitleWriter(s)Length
6."Something for Nothing" 2:57
7."I Love Him So Much" 3:24
8."How Come You Won't Stay Here" 3:03
9."Your Face Stays in My Mind" 2:45
10."You"Jackson, Yancy, Kay Butler3:30

Charts

Chart (1975) Peak
[4]
U.S. Billboard Top LPs 18
U.S. Billboard Top Soul LPs 1
Singles
Year Single Peak chart positions
US
[4]
US
R&B

[4]
US
A/C

[4]
US
Dance

[4]
UK
[5]
1975 "This Will Be" 6 1 45 5 32
"Inseparable" 32 1 20

See also

References

  1. ^ Henderson, Alex. Inseparable > review at AllMusic. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  2. ^ Christgau, Robert. "Inseparable > review". Robert Christgau. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  3. ^ Miller, Jim (November 6, 1975). "Natalie Cole: Inseparable : Music Reviews". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 2006-05-12. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  4. ^ a b c d e "US Charts > Natalie Cole". Allmusic. Retrieved 2013-04-27.
  5. ^ "UK Charts > Natalie Cole". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 2013-04-27.

External links

This page was last edited on 21 October 2018, at 04:22
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