To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Illinois's 4th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Illinois's 4th congressional district
Illinois US Congressional District 4 (since 2013).tif
Illinois's 4th congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Chuy García
DChicago
Area52 sq mi (130 km2)
Distribution
  • 100.0% urban
  • 0.0% rural
Population (2019)676,674
Median household
income
$59,548[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+33[2][3]

The 4th congressional district of Illinois includes part of Cook County, and has been represented by Democrat Jesús "Chuy" García since January 2019.

In November 2017, incumbent Luis Gutiérrez announced that he would retire from Congress at the end of his current term, and not seek re-election in 2018.[4][5] Jesús "Chuy" García was elected on November 6, 2018.

It was featured by The Economist as one of the most strangely drawn and gerrymandered congressional districts in the country,[6] inspired the "Ugly Gerry" gerrymandering typeface,[7] and has been nicknamed "earmuffs" due to its shape.[8] It was created after federal courts ordered the creation of a majority-Hispanic district in the Chicago area. The Illinois General Assembly responded by packing two majority Hispanic parts of Chicago into a single district.

This district covers two strips running east–west across the city of Chicago, on the west side continuing into smaller portions of some suburban areas in Cook County, surrounding Illinois's 7th congressional district. The northern portion is largely Puerto Rican, while the southern portion is heavily Mexican-American. The two sections are only connected by a piece of Interstate 294 to the west; the highway is in the district while the surrounding areas are not. It is the smallest congressional district in area outside New York City and California.[9]

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2000 President Gore 76 – 19%
2004 President Kerry 79 – 21%
2008 President Obama 81 – 18%
2012 President Obama 81 – 17%
2016 President Clinton 82 – 13%
2020 President Biden 81 – 17%

Geography

The 4th District includes the Chicago community of Brighton Park, in addition to almost all of Hermosa, Lower West Side and Gage Park; parts of Albany Park, Irving Park, Avondale, Logan Square, West Town, Humboldt Park, Belmont Cragin, Austin, McKinley Park, South Lawndale, New City, West Elsdon and Archer Heights; portions of riverfront Bridgeport; the portion of North Center southwest of Clybourn Avenue; and the northwestern tip of Lincoln Park.

Since the 2011 redistricting, the district also includes portions of Berwyn, Brookfield, Cicero, Lyons, Melrose Park, Riverside, River Forest, and Elmwood Park.[10]

History

2003 - 2013
2003 - 2013

The Illinois 4th Congressional District was originally formed in 1842. It included 17 counties, which were Cook, Lake, McHenry, Boone, De Kalb, Kane, Du Page, Will, Kendall, Grundy, La Salle, Bureau, Livingston, Iroquois, McLean, Vermilion and Champaign Counties. Beyond this Ford and Kankakee Counties were part of Vermillion and Iroquois Counties respectively at this point and thus in the district's boundaries.[11]

In the redistricting following the 1990 United States Census, Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley and Governor Jim Edgar both wanted a Latino district, as Latinos were the fastest growing demographic group in the state at the time. In June 1991, Congressman Dennis Hastert, a suburban Republican, filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the existing congressional map was unconstitutional;[12] the present congressional district boundaries emerged as a result of that lawsuit. A three-judge panel of the federal district court adopted the map proposed by Hastert and other Republican members of the Illinois Congressional delegation.[13] Subsequent lawsuits challenging the redistricting as racially biased[14] did not succeed in redrawing the district boundaries. The district, as it was in 2009, was in some places less than 50 metres wide and parts covered no more than one city block.[15]


List of members representing the district

Representative Party Years Cong
ress
Notes
District created March 4, 1843
John Wentworth of Chicago.jpeg

John Wentworth
Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1851
28th
29th
30th
31st
Elected in 1842.
Re-elected in 1844.
Re-elected in 1846.
Re-elected in 1848.
[data unknown/missing]
Richard S. Molony Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1850.
[data unknown/missing]
James Knox (page 599 crop) (cropped).jpg

James Knox
Whig March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1852.
Re-elected in 1854.
[data unknown/missing]
Opposition March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th
WilliamKelloggIL.jpg

William Kellogg
Republican March 4, 1857 –
March 3, 1863
35th
36th
37th
Elected in 1856.
Re-elected in 1858.
Re-elected in 1860.
[data unknown/missing]
CharlesMHarris.jpg

Charles M. Harris
Democratic March 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865
38th Elected in 1862.
[data unknown/missing]
AbnerCHarding.jpg

Abner C. Harding
Republican March 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1869
39th
40th
Elected in 1864.
Re-elected in 1866.
[data unknown/missing]
JohnBHawley.jpg

John B. Hawley
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1873
41st
42nd
Elected in 1868.
Re-elected in 1870.
Redistricted to the 6th district.
Stephen A. Hurlbut - Brady-Handy.jpg

Stephen A. Hurlbut
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1877
43rd
44th
Elected in 1872.
Re-elected in 1874.
[data unknown/missing]
William Lathrop Republican March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
45th Elected in 1876.
[data unknown/missing]
John C. Sherwin Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
46th
47th
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
[data unknown/missing]
George E. Adams (Illinois Congressman).jpg

George E. Adams
Republican March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1891
48th
49th
50th
51st
Elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Re-elected in 1888.
[data unknown/missing]
Walter Cass Newberry.jpg

Walter C. Newberry
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1893
52nd Elected in 1890.
[data unknown/missing]
JuliusGoldzier.jpg

Julius Goldzier
Democratic March 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1895
53rd Elected in 1892.
[data unknown/missing]
CharlesWWoodman.jpg

Charles W. Woodman
Republican March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
54th Elected in 1894.
[data unknown/missing]
Daniel W. Mills (Illinois Congressman).jpg

Daniel W. Mills
Republican March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1899
55th Elected in 1896.
[data unknown/missing]
Thomas Cusack (Illinois Congressman).jpg

Thomas Cusack
Democratic March 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1901
56th Elected in 1898.
[data unknown/missing]
James McAndrews (Illinois Congressman).jpg

James McAndrews
Democratic March 4, 1901 –
March 3, 1903
57th Elected in 1900.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
GeorgePeterFoster.jpg

George P. Foster
Democratic March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1905
58th Redistricted from the 3rd district and re-elected in 1902.
[data unknown/missing]
Charles S. Wharton Republican March 4, 1905 –
March 3, 1907
59th Elected in 1904.
[data unknown/missing]
JamesTMcDermott.jpg

James T. McDermott
Democratic March 4, 1907 –
July 21, 1914
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
Elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Resigned.
Vacant July 21, 1914 –
March 3, 1915
63rd
JamesTMcDermott.jpg

James T. McDermott
Democratic March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1917
64th Re-elected in 1914 to fill his own seat.
[data unknown/missing]
Charles Martin (Illinois Congressman) 2.jpg

Charles Martin
Democratic March 4, 1917 –
October 28, 1917
65th Elected in 1916.
Died.
Vacant October 28, 1917 –
April 2, 1918
65th
JohnWRainey.jpg

John W. Rainey
Democratic April 2, 1918 –
May 4, 1923
65th
66th
67th
68th
Elected to finish Martin's term.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Died.
Vacant May 4, 1923 –
November 6, 1923
68th
ThomasADoyle.jpg

Thomas A. Doyle
Democratic November 6, 1923 –
March 3, 1931
68th
69th
70th
71st
Elected to finish Rainey's term.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
[data unknown/missing]
Harry P. Beam Democratic March 4, 1931 –
December 6, 1942
72nd
73rd
74th
75th
76th
77th
Elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Resigned after being elected judge of the Municipal Court of Chicago.
Vacant December 6, 1942 –
January 3, 1943
77th
Martin Gorski (Illinois Congressman).jpg

Martin Gorski
Democratic January 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1949
78th
79th
80th
Elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Redistricted to the 5th district.
James V. Buckley (Illinois Congressman).jpg

James V. Buckley
Democratic January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1951
81st Elected in 1948.
[data unknown/missing]
William E. Mcvey.png

William E. McVey
Republican January 3, 1951 –
August 10, 1958
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
Elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Died.
Vacant August 10, 1958 –
January 3, 1959
85th
Ed derwinski.jpg

Ed Derwinski
Republican January 3, 1959 –
January 3, 1983
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
Elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
[data unknown/missing]
George M. O'Brien.jpg

George M. O'Brien
Republican January 3, 1983 –
July 17, 1986
98th
99th
Redistricted from the 17th district and re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Died.
Vacant July 17, 1986 –
January 3, 1987
99th
Jack Davis 100th Congress 1987.jpg

Jack Davis
Republican January 3, 1987 –
January 3, 1989
100th Elected in 1986.
[data unknown/missing]
George Sangmeister.jpg

George E. Sangmeister
Democratic January 3, 1989 –
January 3, 1993
101st
102nd
Elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Redistricted to the 11th district.
Luis Gutiérrez official photo (cropped).jpg

Luis Gutiérrez
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2019
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
114th
115th
Elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Retired.
Chuy Garcia official portrait.jpg

Jesús "Chuy" García
Democratic January 3, 2019 –
Present
116th
117th
Elected in 2018.
Re-elected in 2020.

Election results

2012

Illinois's 4th congressional district, 2012[16]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 133,226 83.0
Republican Héctor Concepción 27,279 17.0
Independent Ymelda Viramontes 4 0.0
Total votes 160,509 100.0
Democratic hold

2014

Illinois's 4th congressional district, 2014[17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 79,666 78.1
Republican Hector Concepción 22,278 21.9
Total votes 101,944 100.0
Democratic hold

2016

Illinois's 4th congressional district, 2016 [18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Luis Gutiérrez (incumbent) 171,297 100.0
Total votes 171,297 100.0
Democratic hold

2018

Illinois's 4th congressional district, 2018[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jesús "Chuy" García 143,895 86.6
Republican Mark Lorch 22,294 13.4
Total votes 166,189 100.0
Democratic hold

2020

Illinois's 4th congressional district, 2020[20][21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Jesús "Chuy" García (incumbent) 187,219 84.05 -2.54%
Republican Jesus E. Solorio Jr. 35,518 15.95 +2.54%
Total votes 222,737 100.0
Democratic hold


See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=17&cd=04
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Barone, Michael; McCutcheon, Chuck (2013). The Almanac of American Politics 2014. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN 978-0-226-10544-4. Copyright National Journal.
  4. ^ Pearson, Rick; Byrne, John (November 28, 2017). "U.S. Rep. Luis Gutierrez won't run again, wants to rebuild Puerto Rico". ChicagoTribune. Chicago. Retrieved November 28, 2017.
  5. ^ Korecki, Natasha (November 27, 2017). "Gutierrez won't seek reelection". Politico. Arlington, VA. Retrieved November 27, 2017.
  6. ^ The Economist (April 25, 2002). "How to rig an election".
  7. ^ Campbell-Dollaghan, Kelsey (August 2, 2019). "The world's most revolting font is made out of gerrymandered voting districts". Fast Company. Retrieved April 6, 2021.
  8. ^ Aaron Blake (July 27, 2011). "Name that district! (Gerrymandering edition)". Washington Post. Retrieved July 28, 2011.
  9. ^ "Congressional Districts by Land Area (National)". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original (ASCII text) on August 1, 2007. Retrieved November 11, 2006.
  10. ^ Illinois Congressional District 4, Illinois Board of Elections
  11. ^ Parson, Stanley B., William W. Beach and Michael J. Durbin. United States Congressional Districts and Data, 1843–1883 (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1986) p. 9
  12. ^ Hastert v. State Bd. of Elections, 777 F.Supp. 634, 638 (N.D.Ill.1991).
  13. ^ O'Grady, Patrick. "Illinois Redistricting History Since 1970" (PDF). Illinois General Assembly. p. 9. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  14. ^ James R. KING, v. State Bd. of Elections et al.. See [1]; [2]
  15. ^ John N. Friedman; Richard T. Holden. "The Rising Incumbent Reelection Rate: What'sGerrymandering Got to Do With It?". ResearchGate. The Journal of Politics. p. 5. Retrieved January 18, 2020.
  16. ^ "2012 General Election Official Vote Totals" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 19, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "Illinois General Election 2014".
  18. ^ "Illinois General Election 2016".
  19. ^ "2018 General Election Official Vote Totals Book".
  20. ^ "Election Results 2020 GENERAL ELECTION". Illinois State Board of Elections. December 4, 2020. Retrieved December 4, 2020.
  21. ^ "Illinois 2020 Election Results". Chicago Sun-Times. November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 4 July 2021, at 09:35
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.