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Illinois's 18th congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Illinois's 18th congressional district
Illinois US Congressional District 18 (since 2013).tif
Illinois's 18th congressional district—since January 3, 2013.
Representative
  Darin LaHood
RPeoria
Area10,516 sq mi (27,240 km2)
Distribution
  • 63.7% urban
  • 36.3% rural
Population (2019)702,289
Median household
income
$67,284[1]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+15[2][3]

The 18th congressional district of Illinois covers central and western Illinois, including all of Jacksonville and Quincy and parts of Bloomington, Peoria, and Springfield. It is currently held by Republican Darin LaHood, who took office in September 2015 following a special election.[4] Republican Aaron Schock had previously represented the district since January 2009, but resigned March 31, 2015.[5] Special elections were called to select Schock's replacement, with a primary on July 7 and the general election on September 10, 2015.[6] LaHood, son of Schock's predecessor Ray LaHood, won the special election and reelection in 2016 and 2018.

Abraham Lincoln served much of the area that now lies within the 18th district for a single term; it was numbered as the 7th district at the time. It also contains most of the territory that was represented by future United States Senate Minority Leader Everett Dirksen (1933-1949, when it was the 16th district) and longtime House Minority Leader Bob Michel (1957-1995).

From 1949 to 2015, the district was represented by someone who either attended or graduated from Bradley University.

2011 redistricting

The district covers parts of McLean, Peoria, Sangamon, Stark and Tazewell counties, and all of Adams, Brown, Cass, Hancock, Logan, Marshall, Mason, McDonough, Menard, Morgan, Pike, Schuyler, Scott and Woodford counties, as of the 2011 redistricting which followed the 2010 census. All or parts of Bloomington, Chatham, Jacksonville, Lincoln, Macomb, Morton, Normal, Peoria, Quincy and Springfield are included.[7] The representatives for these districts were elected in the 2012 primary and general elections, and the boundaries became effective on January 5, 2013.

Future

Due to Illinois losing population in the 2020 United States Census, the district will be eliminated in 2023.[8]

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history
District created March 4, 1873
Isaac Clements Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Elected in 1872.
Lost re-election.
WilliamHartzell.jpg

William Hartzell
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
44th
45th
Elected in 1874.
Re-elected in 1876.
Retired.
John R. Thomas Republican March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1883
46th
47th
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Redistricted to the 20th district.
WilliamRallsMorrison.png

William R. Morrison
Democratic March 4, 1883 –
March 3, 1887
48th
49th
Redistricted from the 17th district and re-elected in 1882.
Re-elected in 1884.
Lost re-election.
JehuBaker.jpg

Jehu Baker
Republican March 4, 1887 –
March 3, 1889
50th Elected in 1886.
Lost re-election.
William S. Forman Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1895
51st
52nd
53rd
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
[data unknown/missing]
Frederick Remann Republican March 4, 1895 –
July 14, 1895
54th Elected in 1894.
Died.
Vacant July 14, 1895 –
December 2, 1895
William F. L. Hadley Republican December 2, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
Elected to finish Remann's term.
Lost re-election.
ThomasMJett.jpg

Thomas M. Jett
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1903
55th
56th
57th
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Retired.
JGCannon.jpg

Joseph G. Cannon
Republican March 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1913
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
Redistricted from the 12th district and re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Lost re-election.
Frank T. O'Hair.jpg

Frank T. O'Hair
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915
63rd Elected in 1912.
Lost re-election.
JGCannon.jpg

Joseph G. Cannon
Republican March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1923
64th
65th
66th
67th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Re-elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Retired.
WilliamPHoladay.jpg

William P. Holaday
Republican March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1933
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
Elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Lost re-election.
James A. Meeks Democratic March 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1939
73rd
74th
75th
Elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934.
Re-elected in 1936.
Lost re-election.
Jessie Sumner.jpg

Jessie Sumner
Republican January 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1947
76th
77th
78th
79th
Elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Retired.
Edward H. Jenison Republican January 3, 1947 –
January 3, 1949
80th Elected in 1946.
Redistricted to the 23rd district.
Harold Velde.png

Harold H. Velde
Republican January 3, 1949 –
January 3, 1957
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
Elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Retired.
RobertHMichelCP.jpg

Robert H. Michel
Republican January 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1995
85th
86th
87th
88th
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
Elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Re-elected in 1962.
Re-elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Retired.
Ray LaHood.jpg

Ray LaHood
Republican January 3, 1995 –
January 3, 2009
104th
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
Elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000
Re-elected in 2002
Re-elected in 2004
Re-elected in 2006
Retired.[9]
Aaron Schock 113th Congress.jpg

Aaron Schock
Republican January 3, 2009 –
March 31, 2015
111th
112th
113th
114th
Elected in 2008
Re-elected in 2010
Re-elected in 2012
Re-elected in 2014
Resigned.[10]
Vacant March 31, 2015 –
September 10, 2015
114th
Darin LaHood official portrait (cropped).jpg

Darin LaHood
Republican September 10, 2015 –
Present
114th
115th
116th
117th
Elected to finish Schock's term.
Re-elected in 2016
Re-elected in 2018
Re-elected in 2020.
District to be eliminated January 3, 2023

Selected recent election results

Illinois's 18th congressional district: Results 1994–2015[11]
Year Democrat Votes Pct Republican Votes Pct
1994 G. Douglas Stephens 78,332 39% Ray LaHood 119,838 60% *
1996 Mike Curran 98,413 41% Ray LaHood 143,110 59%
1998 (no candidate) Ray LaHood 158,175 100% *
2000 Joyce Harant 85,317 33% Ray LaHood 173,706 67%
2002 (no candidate) Ray LaHood 192,567 100%
2004 Steve Waterworth 91,548 30% Ray LaHood 216,047 70%
2006 Steve Waterworth 73,052 33% Ray LaHood 150,194 67%
2008 Colleen Callahan 117,642 38% Aaron Schock 182,589 59% *
2010 Deirdre "D.K." Hirner 57,046 26% Aaron Schock 152,868 69% *
2012 Steve Waterworth 85,164 26% Aaron Schock 244,467 74%
2014 Darrel Miller 62,377 25% Aaron Schock 184,363 75%
2015 (special) Rob Mellon 15,840 31% Darin LaHood 34,907 69%
2016 Junius Rodriguez 96,770 27.86% Darin LaHood 250,506 72.13%
2018 Junius Rodriguez 95,486 32.8% Darin LaHood 195,927 67.2%
2020 George Petrilli 110,039 29.59% Darin LaHood 261,840 70.41%

* Write-in and minor candidate notes: In 1994, write-ins received 955 votes. In 1998, write-ins received 2 votes. In 2008, Green Party candidate Sheldon Schafer received 9,857 votes. In 2010, Schafer received 11,256 votes.

2008

Ray LaHood decided not to seek re-election in 2008 and was chosen by Barack Obama to serve as U.S. Secretary of Transportation. Illinois State Representative Aaron Schock of Peoria won the seat for the Republicans in the November 4, 2008 election. His main opponent was Democrat Colleen Callahan, of Kickapoo, a radio and television broadcaster. Green Party candidate and educator Sheldon Schafer, of Peoria, was in a distant third place on the ballot.[12]

Illinois's 18th congressional district election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock 182,589 58.88
Democratic Colleen Callahan 117,642 37.94
Green Sheldon Schafer 9,857 3.18
Total votes 310,088 100.00
Republican hold

2010

Illinois's 18th district general election, November 2, 2010[13](p50)
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock (incumbent) 152,868 69.12
Democratic Deirdre "DK" Hirner 57,046 25.79
Green Sheldon Schafer 11,256 5.09
Total votes 221,170 100.00
Republican hold


2012

Illinois's 18th congressional district, 2012[14]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock (incumbent) 244,467 74.2
Democratic Steve Waterworth 85,164 25.8
Total votes 329,631 100.0
Republican hold

2014

Illinois's 18th congressional district, 2014[15]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Aaron Schock (Incumbent) 184,363 74.7
Democratic Darrel Miller 62,377 25.3
Total votes 246,740 100.0
Republican hold

2015 special election

Illinois's 18th congressional district special election, 2015[16][17]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Darin LaHood 35,329 68.8
Democratic Rob Mellon 15,979 31.1
Write-In Constant "Conner" Vlakancic 7 >0.0
Write-In Roger K. Davis 4 >0.0
Total votes 51,319 100
Republican hold

2016

Illinois's 18th congressional district, 2016 [18]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Darin LaHood (incumbent) 250,506 72.1
Democratic Junius Rodriguez 96,770 27.9
Independent Don Vance (write-in) 7 0.0
Total votes 347,283 100.0
Republican hold

2018

Illinois's 18th congressional district, 2018[19]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Darin LaHood (incumbent) 195,927 67.2
Democratic Junius Rodriguez 95,486 32.8
Total votes 291,413 100.0
Republican hold

2020

Illinois's 18th congressional district, 2020[20][21]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Darin LaHood (incumbent) 261,840 70.41 +3.18%
Democratic George Petrilli 110,039 29.59 -3.18%
Total votes 371,879 100.0
Republican hold

Recent election results from presidential races

Year Office Results
2000 President Bush 54 – 43%
2004 President Bush 58 – 42%
2008 President McCain 54 – 44%
2012 President Romney 61 – 37%
2016 President Trump 61 – 33%
2020 President Trump 60 – 36%

Historical district boundaries

2003–2013
2003–2013

See also

References

  1. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=17&cd=18
  2. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  3. ^ Barone, Michael; McCutcheon, Chuck (2013). The Almanac of American Politics 2014. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. pp. 595–598. ISBN 978-0-226-10544-4. Copyright National Journal.
  4. ^ "Darin LaHood wins special election to replace ex-U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock". Chicago Tribune. September 10, 2015. Retrieved September 10, 2015.
  5. ^ "Rep. Aaron Schock Plans to Resign in Wake of Spending Probe". The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2015.
  6. ^ Garcia, Monique (April 14, 2015). "Judge sets special election dates for Schock seat in Congress". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved April 17, 2015.
  7. ^ Illinois Congressional District 18, Illinois Board of Elections
  8. ^ Merica, Dan; Stark, Liz (April 26, 2021). "Census Bureau announces 331 million people in US, Texas will add two congressional seats". CNN. Retrieved April 26, 2021. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Retirement Announcement of Rep. Ray LaHood (Part 1 of 3). YouTube. August 11, 2007. Retrieved April 17, 2015.
  10. ^ Sherman, Jake; Palmer, Anna; Bresnahan, John (March 17, 2015). "Aaron Schock resigns after new questions about mileage expenses". Politico.com. Arlington, Virginia. Retrieved April 17, 2015.
  11. ^ "Election Statistics". Office of the Clerk of the House of Representatives. Archived from the original on July 25, 2007. Retrieved October 6, 2011.
  12. ^ "Elections". WEEK News 25 website. Granite Broadcasting. November 5, 2008. Archived from the original on December 10, 2008. Retrieved November 5, 2008. 100% of precincts reporting. Unframed data at "Archived copy". Archived from the original on April 13, 2009. Retrieved February 18, 2011.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link).
  13. ^ "General Election of November 2, 2010" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 6, 2011. Retrieved February 1, 2014.
  14. ^ "2012 General Election Official Vote Totals" (PDF). Illinois State Board of Elections. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 19, 2013. Retrieved March 26, 2012.
  15. ^ "Illinois General Election 2014". Illinois State Board of Elections. November 4, 2014. Retrieved December 18, 2014.
  16. ^ "Election Results – Special General Election - 9/10/2015". elections.il.gov. Retrieved January 9, 2017.
  17. ^ Kaergard, Chris (September 10, 2015). "State Sen. Darin LaHood wins special election to replace Aaron Schock". Journal Star. Retrieved September 11, 2015.
  18. ^ "Illinois General Election 2016". Illinois State Board of Elections. November 8, 2016. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved December 13, 2016.
  19. ^ "2018 General Election Official Vote Totals Book".
  20. ^ "Election Results 2020 GENERAL ELECTION". Illinois State Board of Elections. December 4, 2020. Retrieved December 4, 2020.
  21. ^ "Illinois 2020 Election Results". Chicago Sun-Times. November 20, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Iowa's 3rd congressional district
Home district of the Speaker of the House
November 9, 1903 – March 4, 1911
Succeeded by
Missouri's 9th congressional district

This page was last edited on 6 May 2021, at 08:34
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