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Ida of Lorraine

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Ida of Lorraine
Ida and the knights
Bornc. 1040
Died13 April 1113 (aged 72–73)
Spouse(s)Eustace II of Boulogne
ChildrenEustace III
Godfrey of Bouillon
Baldwin I
Parent(s)Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine
Doda

Ida of Lorraine (also referred to as Blessed Ida of Boulogne)[1] (c. 1040 – 13 April 1113)[2] was a saint and noblewoman.

She was the daughter of Godfrey III, Duke of Lower Lorraine and his wife Doda.[3] Ida's grandfather was Gothelo I, Duke of Lorraine and Ida's brother was Godfrey IV, Duke of Lower Lorraine.

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Transcription

Contents

Family

In 1049, she married Eustace II, Count of Boulogne.[2] They had three sons:

A daughter, Ida of Boulogne, has also been postulated. She was married first to Herman von Malsen and second to Conon, Count of Montaigu.

Ida shunned the use of a wet-nurse in raising her children. Instead, she breast-fed them to ensure that they were not contaminated by the wet-nurse's morals, i.e. her mode of living.[4] When her sons went on the First Crusade, Ida contributed heavily to their expenses.[5]

Life

Ida was always religiously and charitably active, but the death of her husband provided her wealth and the freedom to use it for her projects. She founded several monasteries:

She maintained a correspondence with Anselm of Canterbury. Some of Anselm's letters to Ida have survived.[8][9]

She became increasingly involved in church life. However, current scholarship feels that she did not actually become a Benedictine Nun, but that she was a "Secular Oblate of the Benedictine Order".[1][6]

Death and burial

Ida died on 13 April 1113, which is the date she is honoured. Traditionally, her burial place has been ascribed to the Monastery of Saint Vaast.[6] Her remains were moved in 1669 to Paris and again in 1808 to Bayeux.[1]

Her life story was written by contemporary monk of Saint Vaast Abbey.[6]

She is venerated in Bayeux.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Butler, Alban; Burns, Paul (2000). Butler's Lives of the Saints. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 94. ISBN 0-86012-253-0.
  2. ^ a b Holböck, Ferdinand (2002). Married Saints and Blesseds. Ignatius Press. p. 147. ISBN 0-89870-843-5.
  3. ^ Butler, Alban; Burns, Paul (2000). Butler's Lives of the Saints. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 93. ISBN 0-86012-253-0.
  4. ^ Tanner, Heather (2004). Families, Friends, and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England c. 879-1160. Boulogne-sur-Mer (France): BRILL. p. 262. ISBN 90-04-13243-0.
  5. ^ Tanner, Heather (2004). Families, Friends, and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England c. 879-1160. Boulogne-sur-Mer (France): BRILL. p. 135. ISBN 90-04-13243-0.
  6. ^ a b c d Holböck, Ferdinand (2002). Married Saints and Blesseds. Ignatius Press. p. 148. ISBN 0-89870-843-5.
  7. ^ a b Tanner, Heather (2004). Families, Friends, and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England c. 879-1160. Boulogne-sur-Mer (France): BRILL. p. 140. ISBN 90-04-13243-0.
  8. ^ Tanner, Heather (2004). Families, Friends, and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England c. 879-1160. Boulogne-sur-Mer (France): BRILL. pp. 123, footnote. ISBN 90-04-13243-0.
  9. ^ Vaughn, Sally N. (1990). "St. Anselm and Women". Haskins Society Journal. University of South Carolina. 2: 86. ISBN 1-85285-059-0.

Sources

  • Butler, Alban; Burns, Paul (2000). Butler's Lives of the Saints. Continuum International Publishing Group. ISBN 0-86012-253-0.
  • Holböck, Ferdinand (2002). Married Saints and Blesseds: Through the Centuries. Ignatius Press. ISBN 9780898708431.
  • Tanner, Heather (2004). Families, Friends, and Allies: Boulogne and Politics in Northern France and England c. 879-1160. Boulogne-sur-Mer (France): BRILL. ISBN 90-04-13243-0.
  • Vaughn, Sally N. (1990). "St. Anselm and Women". Haskins Society Journal. University of South Carolina. 2: 83–94. ISBN 1-85285-059-0.

This page was last edited on 17 September 2019, at 20:32
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