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I Tactical Air Division

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I Tactical Air Division
Active1941–1945
CountryUnited States
BranchUnited States Army Air Forces
RoleCommand of tactical forces

The I Tactical Air Division is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to Second Air Force, based at Biggs Field, Texas. It was inactivated on 22 December 1945.

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Transcription

Contents

History

The air division was activated at Fresno Army Air Base, California as the 4th Ground Air Support Command in September 1941,[1] drawing its cadre from the 15th Bombardment Wing, which was simultaneously inactivated. It was one of five such commands activated that month.[2]

Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the command's observation units performed antisubmarine patrols off the Pacific coast. These patrols continued until January 1943.[2]

At various times, supervised heavy bomber flights to Hawaii, gave air support to ground units in training, participated in air-ground maneuvers, and put on air support demonstrations.[1]

Lineage

  • Constituted as 4 Air Support Command on 21 August 1941
Activated on 3 September 1941
Redesignated 4 Ground Air Support Command 30 April 1942[2]
Redesignated IV Air Support Command 12 September 1942[2]
Redesignated III Tactical Air Division 4 September 1943[2][3]
Redesignated I Tactical Air Division in April 1944
Inactivated on 22 December 1945
Disbanded on 8 October 1948[1][2]

Assignments

Stations

Components

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d Maurer, Combat Units, pp. 432–433
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Abstract, History 4 Air Support Command Sep 1941 – Sep 1943". Air Force History Index. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  3. ^ Maurer indicates this redesignation occurred in August
  4. ^ Butler, William M. (May 8, 2008). "Factsheet Second Air Force (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  5. ^ Butler, William M. (March 13, 2012). "Factsheet Second Air Force (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  6. ^ Robertson, Patsy (February 6, 2015). "Factsheet 12 Operations Group (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  7. ^ Bailey, Carl E. (September 10, 2008). "Factsheet 47 Operations Group (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on February 22, 2013. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  8. ^ Robertson, Patsy (April 9, 2012). "Factsheet 69 Reconnaissance Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2013.
  9. ^ Kane, Robert B. (April 18, 2012). "Factsheet 70 Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Wing (AFISRA)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved March 10, 2013.
  10. ^ Robertson, Patsy (June 10, 2011). "71 Operations Group (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Archived from the original on September 27, 2015. Retrieved July 21, 2015.
  11. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p.155

Hammer Field

Bibliography

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

External links

This page was last edited on 30 November 2017, at 22:53
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