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I'm Nobody's Sweetheart Now

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

I'm Nobody's Sweetheart Now
Directed byArthur Lubin
Produced byJoseph Sansford
Written byScott Darling
Erna Lazarus
Hal Block
Based onstory "The Bride Said No" by Darling and Lazarus
StarringDennis O'Keefe
Constance Moore
Distributed byUniversal Pictures
Release date
1 November 1940
Running time
64 mins
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

I'm Nobody's Sweetheart Now is a 1940 romantic comedy starring Dennis O'Keefe and Constance Moore.[1]

Plot

Football player Tod Lowell is the son of a man running for governor, who needs the support of a political boss. Tod's dad asks a favor, that Tod spend a few weeks squiring Gertrude Morgan, the man's daughter.

Trouble is, Tod's been romantically involved with Betty Gilbert, a nightclub singer, while Gert's gotten engaged to Tod's football rival, Andy Mason. A few tricks are played on the parents to make them believe Tod and Gertrude are serious, but just as they are about to return to their former partners, the two realize they actually have fallen for one another.

Cast

Production

The film was originally called The Bride Said No. Arthur Lubin was assigned to direct in May 1940.[2] Filming started later that month.[3] Hal Block signed to write some last minute comedy dialogue.[4]

Reception

Diabolique magazine called it "a cheerful comedy... so briskly done and well acted that it doesn’t hit you until the movie’s almost over how selfish the lead couple are – Lubin’s empathy for all his characters possibly threw this off balance because all the audience sympathy goes to the partners of O’Keefe and Parrish."[5]

References

  1. ^ I'm Nobody's Sweetheart Now Monthly Film Bulletin; London Vol. 8, Iss. 85, (Jan 1, 1941): 70.
  2. ^ SCREEN NEWS HERE AND IN HOLLYWOOD By DOUGLAS W. CHURCHILL New York Times 2 May 1940: 33.
  3. ^ 'Hail and Farewell' Will Be Stevens Film Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times 7 May 1940: 13.
  4. ^ Linda Darnell Chosen for $2,000,000 Film Schallert, Edwin. Los Angeles Times 14 May 1940: 13.
  5. ^ Vagg, Stephen (14 September 2019). "The Cinema of Arthur Lubin". Diabolique Magazine.

External links

This page was last edited on 5 May 2021, at 16:18
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