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House of Al Sabah

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

House of Al Sabah
آل صباح
Emblem of Kuwait.svg
Emblem and Flag of Kuwait
Flag of Kuwait.svg
Parent houseBani Utbah
CountryKuwait
Foundedc. 1752
FounderSabah I
Current headNawaf Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber
Titles
TraditionsSunni Islam

The House of Al Sabah (Arabic: آل صباحĀl Ṣubāḥ) is the ruling family of Kuwait.

History

Prior to settling in Kuwait, the Al Sabah family were expelled from Umm Qasr in Iraq by the Ottomans due to their predatory habits of preying on caravans in Basra and trading ships in Shatt al-Arab.[1] The family originated from the Jamil branch of the Anza family[2] and part of the Utub federation.[2] The Al Sabah family settled across various regions in southern Iran and Iraq until they finally settled in Kuwait around 1683 or 1714.

Emir

The Emir of Kuwait is the head of state. He is nominated by a family council headed by prominent members of the family.

Crown Prince

The crown prince has to be a senior member of the House. He is nominated by a family council headed by prominent members of the family.

Rulers

Dean of the House

Governing branches

Succession to the throne of Kuwait is limited to the descendants of Mubarak Al-Sabah. The reigning emir must appoint an heir apparent within one year of his accession to the throne.

The Crown Prince has to be a senior member of the House of Sabah. The position of Emir is also traditionally alternated between the two main branches of the House of Sabah, the Al-Ahmed and Al-Salem branches. The Prime Minister is appointed by the Emir.

Chieftain Sheikhs of the House of Sabah have been leading the Military of Kuwait since the early establishment of defense infantry and cavalry forces.[5][6][7] Since the forming of the first cabinet on 17 January 1962, all three of the defense ministry, interior ministry and ministry of foreign affairs of Kuwait have been led by members of the House of Sabah.[8] By government protocol, defense, interior and foreign affairs ministers are deputy prime ministers of Kuwait; unlike the defense protocol minister of the Kuwait National Guard.

Lineage

Sabah I, 
1st Ruler Sheikh (1716–1762)
Abdullah I, 
2nd Ruler Sheikh (1762–1814)
Jaber I, 
3rd Ruler Sheikh (1814–1859)
Sabah II, 
4th Ruler Sheikh (1859–1866)
Abdullah II, 
5th Ruler Sheikh (1866–1892)
Mohammed, 
6th Ruler Sheikh (1892–1896)
Mubarak, 
Mubarak The Great
7th Ruler Sheikh (1896–1915)
Jaber II, 
8th Ruler Sheikh (1915–1917)
Salem, 
9th Ruler Sheikh (1917–1921)
Ahmad, 
10th Ruler Sheikh (1921–1950)
Abdullah III, 
11th Ruler, 1st Emir (1950–1965)

1st Prime Minister
Sabah III, 
12th Ruler, 2nd Emir (1965–1977)

1st Foreign Minister
2nd Prime Minister
Mohammed Ahmad Jaber II,
1st Defense Minister
Jaber III, 
13th Ruler, 3rd Emir, (1977–2006)

3rd Prime Minister
Sabah IV, 
15th Ruler, 5th Emir, (2006–2020)

2nd Foreign Minister
2nd Interior Minister
5th Prime Minister
Nawaf I, 
16th Ruler, 6th Emir, (2020–present)

3rd and 8th Interior Minister
4th Defense Minister
1st National Guard Deputy
Mishal, 
Crown Prince, (2020–present)

2nd National Guard Deputy
Saad, 
14th Ruler, 4th Emir, 2006

1st Interior Minister
2nd Defense Minister
4th Prime Minister
Salem
4th Interior Minister
3rd and 7th Defense Minister
Mohammad Al-Sabah,
3rd Foreign Minister
Nasser,
6th Prime Minister
Nasser,
13th Defense Minister

See also

References

  1. ^ "'Gazetteer of the Persian Gulf. Vol I. Historical. Part IA & IB. J G Lorimer. 1915' [1000] (1155/1782)". qdl.qa. p. 1000. Retrieved 16 January 2015. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b Hamad Ibrahim Abdul Rahman Al Tuwaijri (1996). "Political power and rule in Kuwait" (PhD Thesis). Glasgow University. p. 6. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  3. ^ "KUWAIT NATIONAL GUARD - الحرس الوطني الكويتي -". kng.gov.kw.
  4. ^ "Kuwait National Guard - الحرس الوطني الكويتي -". kng.gov.kw. Archived from the original on 3 March 2018. Retrieved 17 January 2020.
  5. ^ "Kuwait National Guard - الحرس الوطني الكويتي -". kng.gov.kw. Archived from the original on 2 April 2015. Retrieved 17 January 2020.
  6. ^ YouTube. youtube.com.
  7. ^ "Kuwait National Guard - الحرس الوطني الكويتي -". kng.gov.kw. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 17 January 2020.
  8. ^ "Nine ministers headed Interior Ministry since Kuwaits independence". KUNA. 7 February 2011. Retrieved 15 September 2013.

External links

This page was last edited on 7 April 2021, at 15:31
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