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Home Run Derby

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Home Run Derby
Giancarlo Stanton holds up the T-Mobile -HRDerby trophy. (28476385401).jpg
Giancarlo Stanton poses with the trophy for winning the 2016 Home Run Derby
FrequencyAnnual
LocationVaries (site of MLB All-Star Game)
Inaugurated1985
Most RecentJuly 8, 2019 (Progressive Field, Cleveland, Ohio)
Next EventJuly 13, 2020 (Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles, Calif.)
Current ChampionPete Alonso
Current runner-upVladimir Guerrero Jr.
ParticipantsAmerican League and National League baseball players
Organized byMajor League Baseball

The Home Run Derby is an annual home run hitting competition in Major League Baseball (MLB) customarily held the day before the MLB All-Star Game, which places the contest on a Monday in July. Since the inaugural derby in 1985, the event has seen several rule changes, evolving from a short outs-based competition, to multiple rounds, and eventually a bracket-style timed event.

History

2008 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby
2008 Major League Baseball Home Run Derby

The event has grown significantly from its roots in the 1980s, when it was not televised. Prior to 1991, the Home Run Derby was structured as a two-inning event with each player receiving five outs per inning, allowing for the possibility of ties. It is now one of the most-watched events broadcast on ESPN.[1][2][3]

In 2000, a "match play"-style format was instituted for the second round. The player with the most home runs in the first round faced the player with the least among the four qualifying players, as did the players with the second- and third-most totals. The contestant who won each matchup advanced to the finals. This format was discontinued after the 2003 competition.

The field of players selected currently consists of four American League players and four National League players. The first Derby in 1985 featured five from each league, and the 1986 and 1987 events featured three and two players from each league, respectively. In 1996, the field was again expanded to ten players, with five from each league (though in 1997, the AL had six contestants to the NL's four).

In 2000, the field reverted to the current four-player-per-league format. The only exception was 2005, when Major League Baseball changed the selection criteria so that eight players represented their home countries instead of their respective leagues. The change was believed to be in promotion of the inaugural World Baseball Classic, played in March 2006.[citation needed] In 2006, the selection of four players from each league resumed. In 2011, the format was revised so that team captains selected the individual sides.[citation needed]

Some notable performances in the Derby include Bobby Abreu in 2005, who won the Derby with a then-record 41 homers, including a then-record 24 in the first round. The first-round record was broken in 2019 by Vladimir Guerrero Jr., who hit 29 home runs. He broke that record in the following round, hitting 40 home runs in 2 tiebreakers. The previous overall record was set in 2016 by Giancarlo Stanton, who finished with a total of 61 home runs, defeating Todd Frazier in the final round. The current overall record is held by Vladimir Guerrero Jr. at a mark of 91, set in 2019. Only two participants, Yoenis Céspedes and Giancarlo Stanton, have won the Home Run Derby without being selected to the All-Star Game.[4]

Overview

Format

8 players duel in a home run challenge.

1985–1990

In the early years of the Home Run Derby, 4-10 players from both the AL and NL were selected to participate. Each player was given 2 "innings" to hit as many home runs as possible before reaching 5 outs. For the derby, an out is defined as any swing that is not a home run. The winner of the contest was the player with the most total home runs in the two innings.

1991–2005

Beginning in 1991, the format changed to a 3-round contest. From 1991–2006, 8-10 players were selected and hit as many home runs as possible before reaching 10 outs in each round. The tally reset for each round, with the top four advancing to the second round, and the top two advancing to the final.

In honor of the World Baseball Classic, the 2005 contest featured eight players from different countries. The format remained the same.

2006–2013

The format changed slightly in 2006. Instead of the tally resetting for each round, it was only reset before the final round. Therefore, the players with the four highest totals after Round 1 advanced to Round 2, and the players with the two highest sum of Round 1 and 2 advanced to the finals.

2014

The Home Run Derby format was changed significantly in 2014, as MLB sought to speed-up the contest and increase the drama. In the new bracket format, five players from each league faced the other players in their league in Round 1, with each players having seven "outs." The player in each league with the highest Round 1 total received a second-round bye, and the players with the second- and third-highest Round 1 totals from each league faced off. The Round 2 winner from each league faced the Round 1 winner, and the Round 3 winner crowned the league winner. The final featured the winner of each league. Each round stands alone, with the score reset for each round.[5] Ties in any round are broken by a 3-swing swing-off. If the players remain tied, the players engage in a sudden-death swing-off until one player homers.[6]

2015–Present

The format was changed once again in 2015. The most significant change was the elimination of "outs", which was replaced by a time limit. Eight players are seeded based on their season home run totals and are given five minutes to hit as many home runs as possible. The winner of each head-to-head matchup advances, until a final winner is determined. If a tie occurs in any match-up, two sets of tiebreakers are employed: first, a 1-minute swing-off decides the winner; thereafter, multiple swingoffs of 3 swings until a winner is determined. Further, a player can get "bonus time" in the last minute of each round. During that time, the clock would stop for each home run, and would not restart until a swing does not result in a home run. Additional bonus time could be earned for distance. Players who hit at least two home runs measuring at least 420 feet (128.0 m) are given an extra minute of bonus time. An additional 30 seconds of bonus time is granted if at least one home run measures over 475 feet (144.8 m).[7]

Weather concerns in 2015 lead to a reduction in time from five minutes per round to four minutes. The clock was not stopped in the final minute, and one minute of bonus time was granted only for hitting two home runs of at least 425 feet (129.5 m).[8]

The four-minute round length was made permanent in 2016, while the minute of bonus time was reduced to 30 seconds and required two home runs of at least 440 feet (134.1 m). The additional time was removed.[9] Each batter is allowed one time-out during each round, and two in the finals.

For 2017 and 2018, the first tie-breaker was increased from a 1-minute swing off to ​1 12 minutes. However, it was not needed either of these years. The swing off reverted back to one minute in 2019, the first year in which it was used.

Gold balls

From 2005–2013, a gold ball has been used once a player reaches nine outs (in 2014 when the T-Mobile Ball came into play, six; since 2015, during the final minute). If a batter hit a home run using the golden ball, Century 21 Real Estate and Major League Baseball would donate $21,000 (a reference to the "21" in "Century 21") per home run to charity (MLB donated to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, and Century 21 donated to Easter Seals). In both 2005 and 2006, $294,000 was raised for the charities, equaling fourteen golden ball home runs per year. State Farm continued this in 2007 as they designated $17,000 per home run (one dollar for each of State Farm's agencies), to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. In the 2007 event, fifteen golden balls were hit for a donation of $255,000, and ten ($170,000) were hit in the 2008 event. For 2009, State Farm added $5,000 for all non-Gold Ball homers, and $517,000 was collected. For 2010, the non-Gold Ball homer was reduced to $3,000 per home run and a total of $453,000 was collected. Since 2014 any homer hit off a T-Mobile Ball resulted in a $10,000 donation to charity by T-Mobile and MLB, to Team Rubicon.

Television and radio coverage

On July 11, 1988, the day before the Major League Baseball All-Star Game from Cincinnati, TBS televised the annual All-Star Gala[10] from the Cincinnati Zoo. Larry King hosted the broadcast with Craig Sager and Pete Van Wieren handling interviews. The broadcast's big draw would have been the Home Run Derby, which TBS intended on taping during the afternoon, and later airing it in prime time during the Gala coverage. Unfortunately, the derby and a skills competition were canceled due to rain.

The derby was first nationally televised by ESPN in 1993 on a same-day delayed basis,[11] with the first live telecast in 1998. Although two hours are scheduled in programming listings for the telecast, it has rarely ever been contained to the timeslot and consistently runs three to four hours. Chris Berman has gained notoriety for his annual hosting duties on ESPN, including his catchphrase, "Back back back…Gone!". Berman starts this phrase when the ball is hit, and does not say "Gone!" until the ball lands.

The 2008 Derby was the year's most highly rated basic cable program.[12]

Because of the game's TV popularity, invited players have felt pressure to participate. Notably, Ken Griffey Jr. initially quietly declined to take part in 1998, partly due to ESPN scheduling the Mariners in their late Sunday game the night before. After a discussion with ESPN's Joe Morgan and another with Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, Griffey changed his mind, and then won the Derby at Coors Field.[13]

In Spanish, the event is televised on Spanish language network ESPN Deportes.[14]

ESPN Radio also carries the event annually.[15]

Most watched Home Run Derbys

Rank Year Winner Ballpark Viewers (millions)[16]
1 2008 Justin Morneau Yankee Stadium 9.1
2 2017 Aaron Judge Marlins Park 8.6
3 2009 Prince Fielder Busch Stadium 8.3
4 2004 Miguel Tejada Minute Maid Park 7.7
5 2002 Jason Giambi Miller Park 7.7
6 2015 Todd Frazier Great American Ball Park 7.1
7 2012 Prince Fielder Kauffman Stadium 6.9
8 2007 Vladimir Guerrero Sr. AT&T Park 6.8
9 2006 Ryan Howard PNC Park 6.8
10 2013 Yoenis Céspedes Citi Field 6.7

Winners

Prince Fielder accepting his second trophy in 2012
Prince Fielder accepting his second trophy in 2012
Key
^
Indicates multiple winners in the same year
dagger
Member of the Baseball Hall of Fame
Year Winner Team League Stadium
1985 Dave Parker Cincinnati Reds NL Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome (MIN)
1986^ Wally Joyner California Angels AL Astrodome (HOU)
Darryl Strawberry New York Mets NL
1987 Andre Dawsondagger Chicago Cubs NL Oakland–Alameda County Coliseum (OAK)
1988 Cancelled due to rain
1989^ Eric Davis Cincinnati Reds NL Anaheim Stadium (CAL)
Rubén Sierra Texas Rangers AL
1990 Ryne Sandbergdagger Chicago Cubs NL Wrigley Field (CHC)
1991 Cal Ripken Jr.dagger Baltimore Orioles AL SkyDome (TOR)
1992 Mark McGwire Oakland Athletics AL Jack Murphy Stadium (SD)
1993 Juan González Texas Rangers AL Oriole Park at Camden Yards (BAL)
1994 Ken Griffey Jr.dagger (1) Seattle Mariners AL Three Rivers Stadium (PIT)
1995 Frank Thomasdagger Chicago White Sox AL The Ballpark in Arlington (TEX)
1996 Barry Bonds San Francisco Giants NL Veterans Stadium (PHI)
1997 Tino Martinez New York Yankees AL Jacobs Field (CLE)
1998 Ken Griffey Jr.dagger (2) Seattle Mariners AL Coors Field (COL)
1999 Ken Griffey Jr.dagger (3) Seattle Mariners AL Fenway Park (BOS)
2000 Sammy Sosa Chicago Cubs NL Turner Field (ATL)
2001 Luis Gonzalez Arizona Diamondbacks NL Safeco Field (SEA)
2002 Jason Giambi New York Yankees AL Miller Park (MIL)
2003 Garret Anderson Anaheim Angels AL U.S. Cellular Field (CHW)
2004 Miguel Tejada Baltimore Orioles AL Minute Maid Park (HOU)
2005 Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies NL Comerica Park (DET)
2006 Ryan Howard Philadelphia Phillies NL PNC Park (PIT)
2007 Vladimir Guerrerodagger Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim AL AT&T Park (SF)
2008 Justin Morneau Minnesota Twins AL Yankee Stadium (NYY)
2009 Prince Fielder (1) Milwaukee Brewers NL Busch Stadium (STL)
2010 David Ortiz Boston Red Sox AL Angel Stadium of Anaheim (LAA)
2011 Robinson Canó New York Yankees AL Chase Field (ARI)
2012 Prince Fielder (2) Detroit Tigers AL Kauffman Stadium (KC)
2013 Yoenis Céspedes (1) Oakland Athletics AL Citi Field (NYM)
2014 Yoenis Céspedes (2) Oakland Athletics AL Target Field (MIN)
2015 Todd Frazier Cincinnati Reds NL Great American Ball Park (CIN)
2016 Giancarlo Stanton Miami Marlins NL Petco Park (SD)
2017 Aaron Judge New York Yankees AL Marlins Park (MIA)
2018 Bryce Harper Washington Nationals NL Nationals Park (WAS)
2019 Pete Alonso New York Mets NL Progressive Field (CLE)

Records

Most home runs in a single round

Note: these numbers include swingoffs

Rank Player Team Round Total
1 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 2019 Second Round 40
2 Joc Pederson Los Angeles Dodgers 2019 Second Round 39
3 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 2019 First Round 29
4 Josh Hamilton Texas Rangers 2008 First Round 28
5 Ronald Acuña Jr. Atlanta Braves 2019 First Round 25

Most single-derby home runs

Note: these numbers include swingoffs.

Rank Player Team Year Total
1 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 2019 91
2 Giancarlo Stanton Miami Marlins 2016 61
3 Joc Pederson Los Angeles Dodgers 2019 60
4 Pete Alonso New York Mets 2019 57
5 Kyle Schwarber Chicago Cubs 2018 55
6 Aaron Judge New York Yankees 2017 47
7 Bryce Harper Washington Nationals 2018 45
8 Ronald Acuña Jr. Atlanta Braves 2019 44
9 Todd Frazier Chicago White Sox 2016 42
10 Bobby Abreu Philadelphia Phillies 2005 41

Most all-time home runs

Note: these numbers include swingoffs.

Rank Player Team(s) Year(s) Total
1 Joc Pederson Los Angeles Dodgers 2015, 2019 99
2 Todd Frazier Cincinnati Reds, Chicago White Sox 2014, 2015, 2016 91
Vladimir Guerrero Jr. Toronto Blue Jays 2019 91
4 Giancarlo Stanton Miami Marlins 2014, 2016, 2017 83
5 Prince Fielder Milwaukee Brewers, Detroit Tigers 2009, 2012 81
6 David Ortiz Boston Red Sox 2004, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011 77
7 Albert Pujols St. Louis Cardinals, Los Angeles Angels 2007, 2009, 2015 71
8 Ken Griffey Jr. Seattle Mariners, Cincinnati Reds 1990, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000 70
9 Bryce Harper Washington Nationals 2013, 2018 69
10 Jason Giambi Oakland Athletics, New York Yankees 2001, 2002, 2003 67

Wins by team

Rank Team Wins Years
1 New York Yankees 4 1997, 2002, 2011, 2017
2 Los Angeles Angels 3 1986*, 2003, 2007
Oakland Athletics 3 1992, 2013, 2014
Chicago Cubs 3 1987, 1990, 2000
Seattle Mariners 3 1994, 1998, 1999
Cincinnati Reds 3 1985, 1989*, 2015
7 Baltimore Orioles 2 1991, 2004
Philadelphia Phillies 2 2005, 2006
New York Mets 2 1986*, 2019
Texas Rangers 2 1989*, 1993
11 Chicago White Sox 1 1995
San Francisco Giants 1 1996
Arizona Diamondbacks 1 2001
Minnesota Twins 1 2008
Milwaukee Brewers 1 2009
Boston Red Sox 1 2010
Detroit Tigers 1 2012
Miami Marlins 1 2016
Washington Nationals 1 2018
*In 1986, Wally Joyner of the California Angels and Darryl Strawberry of the New York Mets were declared co-champions.
*In 1989, Eric Davis of the Cincinnati Reds and Ruben Sierra of the Texas Rangers were declared co-champions.

Complete scoreboard

Key
dagger
Member of the Baseball Hall of Fame

1980s

1985

The Metrodome, Minneapolis—A.L. 17, N.L. 16
Player Team Home runs
American League
Jim Ricedagger Boston 4
Eddie Murraydagger Baltimore 4
Carlton Fiskdagger Chicago 4
Tom Brunansky Minnesota 4
Cal Ripken Jr.dagger Baltimore 1
National League
Dave Parker Cincinnati 6
Dale Murphy Atlanta 4
Steve Garvey San Diego 2
Ryne Sandbergdagger Chicago 2
Jack Clark St. Louis 2

1986

Astrodome, Houston—N.L. 8, A.L. 7
Player Team Home runs
American League
Wally Joyner California 4
Jesse Barfield Toronto 2
Jose Canseco Oakland 1
National League
Darryl Strawberry New York 4
Dave Parker Cincinnati 3
Hubie Brooks Montreal 1

1987

Oakland Coliseum, Oakland—N.L. 6, A.L. 2
Player Team Home runs
American League
George Bell Toronto 1
Mark McGwire Oakland 1
National League
Andre Dawsondagger Chicago 4
Ozzie Virgil Jr. Atlanta 2

1988

Home Run Derby canceled due to rain.

1989

Anaheim Stadium, Anaheim—N.L. 9, A.L. 5
Player Team Home runs
American League
Rubén Sierra Texas 3
Mickey Tettleton Baltimore 1
Bo Jackson Kansas City 1
Gary Gaetti Minnesota 0
National League
Eric Davis Cincinnati 3
Glenn Davis Houston 2
Howard Johnson New York 2
Kevin Mitchell San Francisco 2

1990s

1990

Wrigley Field, Chicago—N.L. 4, A.L. 1
Player Team Home runs
American League
Mark McGwire Oakland 1
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 0
Jose Canseco Oakland 0
Cecil Fielder Detroit 0
National League
Ryne Sandbergdagger Chicago 3
Matt Williams San Francisco 1
Bobby Bonilla Pittsburgh 0
Darryl Strawberry New York 0

1991

SkyDome, Toronto—A.L. 20, N.L. 7
Player Team Home runs
American League
Cal Ripken Jr.dagger Baltimore 12
Cecil Fielder Detroit 4
Joe Carter Toronto 2
Danny Tartabull Kansas City 2
National League
Paul O'Neill Cincinnati 5
George Bell Chicago 2
Chris Sabo Cincinnati 0
Howard Johnson New York 0

1992

Jack Murphy Stadium, San Diego—A.L. 27, N.L. 13
Player Team Home runs
American League
Mark McGwire Oakland 12
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 7
Joe Carter Toronto 4
Cal Ripken Jr.dagger Baltimore 4
National League
Larry Walker Montreal 4
Gary Sheffield San Diego 4
Fred McGriff San Diego 3
Barry Bonds Pittsburgh 2

1993

Camden Yards, Baltimore—A.L. 20, N.L. 12
Player Team Home runs
American League
Juan González Texas 7
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 7 *
Cecil Fielder Detroit 4
Albert Belle Cleveland 3
National League
Barry Bonds San Francisco 5
Bobby Bonilla New York 5
David Justice Atlanta 2
Mike Piazzadagger Los Angeles 0

* Lost in playoff to Gonzalez

1994

Three Rivers Stadium, Pittsburgh—A.L. 17, N.L. 11
Player Team Home runs
American League
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 7
Rubén Sierra Oakland 4
Frank Thomasdagger Chicago 4
Albert Belle Cleveland 2
National League
Fred McGriff Atlanta 5
Jeff Bagwelldagger Houston 3
Dante Bichette Colorado 3
Mike Piazzadagger Los Angeles 0

1995

The Ballpark in Arlington, Arlington—A.L. 40, N.L. 12
Player Team Home runs
American League
Frank Thomasdagger Chicago 15 *
Albert Belle Cleveland 16
Mo Vaughn Boston 6
Manny Ramirez Cleveland 3
National League
Ron Gant Cincinnati 6
Sammy Sosa Chicago 2
Reggie Sanders Cincinnati 2
Raúl Mondesí Los Angeles 2

* Beat Belle in finals

1996

Veterans Stadium, Philadelphia—A.L. 36, N.L. 23
Player Team Home runs
American League
Mark McGwire Oakland 15
Brady Anderson Baltimore 11
Jay Buhner Seattle 8
Joe Carter Toronto 2
Greg Vaughn Milwaukee 0
National League
Barry Bonds San Francisco 17
Henry Rodríguez Montreal 3
Jeff Bagwelldagger Houston 2
Ellis Burks Colorado 1
Gary Sheffield Florida 0

1997

Jacobs Field, Cleveland—A.L. 32, N.L. 29
Player Team Home runs
American League
Tino Martinez New York 16 *
Mark McGwire Oakland 7
Brady Anderson Baltimore 4
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 3
Nomar Garciaparra Boston 0
Jim Thomedagger Cleveland 0
National League
Larry Walker Colorado 19
Jeff Bagwelldagger Houston 5
Chipper Jonesdagger Atlanta 3
Ray Lankford St. Louis 2

* Beat Walker in finals

1998

Coors Field, Denver—A.L. 53, N.L. 29
Player Team Home runs
American League
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 19
Rafael Palmeiro Baltimore 10
Jim Thomedagger Cleveland 17
Alex Rodriguez Seattle 5
Damion Easley Detroit 2
National League
Vinny Castilla Colorado 12
Moisés Alou Houston 7
Javy López Atlanta 5
Mark McGwire St. Louis 4
Chipper Jonesdagger Atlanta 1

1999

Fenway Park, Boston—N.L. 39, A.L. 23
Player Team Home runs
American League
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Seattle 16
Nomar Garciaparra Boston 2
B. J. Surhoff Baltimore 2
Shawn Green Toronto 2
John Jaha Oakland 1
National League
Jeromy Burnitz Milwaukee 14
Mark McGwire St. Louis 16 *
Jeff Bagwelldagger Houston 6
Larry Walker Colorado 2
Sammy Sosa Chicago 1

* Lost to Burnitz in round 2

2000s

2000

Turner Field, Atlanta—N.L. 41, A.L. 21
Player Team Round 1 Semis Finals Total
Sammy Sosa Cubs 6 11 9 26
Ken Griffey Jr.dagger Reds 6 3 2 11
Carl Everett Red Sox 6 6 12
Carlos Delgado Blue Jays 5 1 6
Edgar Martínez Mariners 2 2
Chipper Jonesdagger Braves 2 2
Vladimir Guerrerodagger Expos 2 2
Iván Rodríguezdagger Rangers 1 1
Semifinals Finals
      
1 3
4 Carlos Delgado 1
1 2
3 Sammy Sosa 9
2 Carl Everett 6
3 Sammy Sosa 11

2001

Safeco Field, Seattle—N.L. 41, A.L. 25
Player Team Round 1 Semis Finals Totals
Luis Gonzalez Diamondbacks 5 5 6 16
Sammy Sosa Cubs 3 8 2 13
Jason Giambi Athletics 14 6 20
Barry Bonds Giants 7 3 10
Bret Boone Mariners 3 3
Todd Helton Rockies 2 2
Alex Rodriguez Rangers 2 2
Troy Glaus Angels 0 0
Semifinals Finals
      
1 Jason Giambi 6
4 Sammy Sosa 8
4 Sammy Sosa 2
3 Luis Gonzalez 6
2 Barry Bonds 3
3 Luis Gonzalez 5

2002

Miller Park, Milwaukee—A.L. 42, N.L. 31
Player Team Round 1 Semis Finals Totals
Jason Giambi Yankees 11 6 7 24
Sammy Sosa Cubs 12 5 1 18
Paul Konerko White Sox 6 6 12
Richie Sexson Brewers 6 4 10
Torii Hunter Twins 3 3
Barry Bonds Giants 2 2
Alex Rodriguez Rangers 2 2
Lance Berkman Astros 1 1
Semifinals Finals
      
1 Sammy Sosa 5
4 Richie Sexson 4
1 Jason Giambi 7
2 Sammy Sosa 1
2 Jason Giambi 7
3 Paul Konerko 6

* Giambi defeated Konerko in a swing off

2003

U.S. Cellular Field, Chicago—A.L. 47, N.L. 39
Player Team Round 1 Semis Finals Total
Garret Anderson Angels 7 6 9 22
Albert Pujols Cardinals 4 14 8 26
Jason Giambi Yankees 12 11 23
Jim Edmonds Cardinals 4 4 8
Gary Sheffield Braves 4 4
Carlos Delgado Blue Jays 2 3
Richie Sexson Brewers 1 1
Bret Boone Mariners 0 0
Semifinals Finals
      
1 Jason Giambi 11
4 Albert Pujols 14
4 Albert Pujols 8
2 Garret Anderson 9
2 Garret Anderson 6
3 Jim Edmonds 4

2004

Minute Maid Park, Houston—A.L. 47, N.L. 41
Player Team Round 1 Semis Finals Total
Miguel Tejada Orioles 7 15 5 27
Lance Berkman Astros 7 10 4 21
Rafael Palmeiro Orioles 9 5 14
Barry Bonds Giants 8 3 11
Sammy Sosa Cubs 5 5
Jim Thomedagger Phillies 4 4
Hank Blalock Rangers 3 3
David Ortiz Red Sox 3 3

2005

Comerica Park, Detroit—N.L. 66, A.L. 42
Player Home Country Team Round 1 Semis Finals Totals
Bobby Abreu Venezuela Phillies 24 6 11 41*
Iván Rodríguezdagger Puerto Rico Tigers 7 8 5 20
David Ortiz Dominican Republic Red Sox 17 3 20
Carlos Lee Panama Brewers 11 4 15
Hee-seop Choi South Korea Dodgers 5 5
Andruw Jones Netherlands Braves 5 5
Mark Teixeira USA Rangers 2 2
Jason Bay Canada Pirates 0 0

* Total rounds record.

2006

PNC Park, Pittsburgh—N.L. 62, A.L. 24
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Ryan Howard Phillies 8 10 18 5 23
David Wright Mets 16 2 18 4 22
Miguel Cabrera Marlins 9 6 15 15
David Ortiz Red Sox 10 3 13 13
Jermaine Dye White Sox 7 7 7
Lance Berkman Astros 3 3 3
Miguel Tejada Orioles 3 3 3
Troy Glaus Blue Jays 1 1 1

2007

AT&T Park, San Francisco—A.L. 42, N.L. 32
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Vladimir Guerrerodagger Angels 5 9 14 3a 17
Alex Ríos Blue Jays 5 12 17 2 19
Matt Holliday Rockies 5 8 13 13
Albert Pujols Cardinals 4 (2) 9 13 13
Justin Morneau Twins 4 (1) 4 4
Prince Fielder Brewers 3 3 3
Ryan Howard Phillies 3 3 3
Magglio Ordóñez Tigers 2 2 2

Notes:
^a Recorded only seven of ten outs before hitting winning home run.
Italicized numbers denote swing-offs.

2008

Yankee Stadium, New York—A.L. 66, N.L. 39
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Justin Morneau Twins 8 9 17 5 22
Josh Hamilton Rangers 28a 4b 32 3 35
Lance Berkman Astros 8 6 14 14
Ryan Braun Brewers 7 7 14 14
Dan Uggla Marlins 6 6 6
Grady Sizemore Indians 6 6 6
Chase Utley Phillies 5 5 5
Evan Longoria Rays 3 3 3

Notes:
^a New single round record.
^b Voluntarily ended round with four outs.

2009

Busch Stadium, St. Louis—N.L. 51, A.L. 31
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Prince Fielder Brewers 11 6 17 6 23
Nelson Cruz Rangers 11 5 16 5 21
Ryan Howard Phillies 7 8 15 15
Albert Pujols Cardinals 5 (2) 6 11 11
Carlos Peña Rays 5 (1) 5 5
Joe Mauer Twins 5 (0) 5 5
Adrián González Padres 2 2 2
Brandon Inge Tigers 0 0 0

Notes:
Italicized numbers denote swing-offs.

2010s

2010

Angel Stadium of Anaheim, Anaheim—A.L. 50, N.L. 45
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
David Ortiz Red Sox 8 13 21 11 32
Hanley Ramírez Marlins 9 12 21 5 26
Corey Hart Brewers 13 0 13 13
Miguel Cabrera Tigers 7 5 12 12
Matt Holliday Cardinals 5 5 5
Nick Swisher Yankees 4 4 4
Vernon Wells Blue Jays 2 2 2
Chris Young Diamondbacks 1 1 1

2011

Chase Field, Phoenix—A.L. 76, N.L. 19
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Robinson Canó Yankees 8 12 20 12 32
Adrián González Red Sox 9 11 20 11 31
Prince Fielder Brewers 5 (5) 4 9 9
David Ortiz Red Sox 5 (4) 4 9 9
Matt Holliday Cardinals 5 (2) 5 5
José Bautista Blue Jays 4 4 4
Rickie Weeks Jr. Brewers 3 3 3
Matt Kemp Dodgers 2 2 2

Notes:
Italicized numbers denote swing-offs.

2012

Kauffman Stadium, Kansas City—A.L. 61, N.L. 21
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Prince Fielder Tigers 5 11 16 12 28
José Bautista Blue Jays 11 2 13 (2) 7 20
Mark Trumbo Angels 7 6 13 (1) 13
Carlos Beltrán Cardinals 7 5 12 12
Carlos González Rockies 4 4 4
Andrew McCutchen Pirates 4 4 4
Matt Kemp Dodgers 1 1 1
Robinson Canó Yankees 0 0 0

Notes:
Italicized numbers denote swing-offs.

2013

Citi Field, New York—A.L. 53, N.L. 50
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Subtotal Finals Total
Yoenis Céspedes Athletics 17 6 23 9a 32
Bryce Harper Nationals 8 8 16 8 24
Michael Cuddyer Rockies 7 8 15 15
Chris Davis Orioles 8 4 12 12
Pedro Álvarez Pirates 6 6 6
Prince Fielder Tigers 5 5 5
David Wright Mets 5 5 5
Robinson Canó Yankees 4 4 4

Note:
^a Recorded only five of ten outs before hitting winning home run.

2014

Target Field, Minneapolis — A.L. 54, N.L. 24
American League
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Finals Total
Yoenis Céspedes Athletics 3 (2) 9 7 9 28
José Bautista Blue Jays 10 * 4 14
Adam Jones Orioles 4 3 7
Josh Donaldson Athletics 3 (1) 3
Brian Dozier Twins 2 2
National League
Player Team Round 1 Round 2 Round 3 Finals Total
Todd Frazier Reds 2 (1) 6 1 1 10
Giancarlo Stanton Marlins 6 * 0 6
Troy Tulowitzki Rockies 4 2 6
Justin Morneau Rockies 2 (0) 2
Yasiel Puig Dodgers 0 0

* designates bye round.
(designates swing off home runs).

  Round 2     Round 3 (Semifinals)     Finals
                           
  American League     1 José Bautista 4  
  2 Adam Jones 3     3 Yoenis Céspedes 7    
  3 Yoenis Céspedes 9         3 Yoenis Céspedes 9
      3 Todd Frazier 1
  National League     1 Giancarlo Stanton 0    
  2 Troy Tulowitzki 2     3 Todd Frazier 1  
  3 Todd Frazier 6  

2015 Great American Ball Park (Cincinnati)

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 Albert Pujols (LAA) 10
8 Kris Bryant (CHC) 9
1 Albert Pujols 11
4 Joc Pederson 12
4 Joc Pederson (LAD) 13
5 Manny Machado (BAL) 12
4 Joc Pederson 14
2 Todd Frazier 15
3 Josh Donaldson (TOR) 9
6 Anthony Rizzo (CHC) 8
3 Josh Donaldson 9
2 Todd Frazier 10
2 Todd Frazier (CIN) 14
7 Prince Fielder (TEX) 13

2016 Petco Park (San Diego)

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 Mark Trumbo (BAL) 16
8 Corey Seager (LAD) 15
1 Mark Trumbo 14
5 Giancarlo Stanton 17
4 Robinson Canó (SEA) 7
5 Giancarlo Stanton (MIA) 24
5 Giancarlo Stanton 20
2 Todd Frazier 13
3 Adam Duvall (CIN) 11
6 Wil Myers (SD) 10
3 Adam Duvall 15
2 Todd Frazier 16
2 Todd Frazier (CWS) 13
7 Carlos González (COL) 12

2017 Marlins Park (Miami)

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 Giancarlo Stanton (MIA) 16
8 Gary Sánchez (NYY) 17
8 Gary Sánchez 10
5 Miguel Sanó 11
4 Mike Moustakas (KC) 10
5 Miguel Sanó (MIN) 11
5 Miguel Sanó 10
2 Aaron Judge 11
3 Cody Bellinger (LAD) 15
6 Charlie Blackmon (COL) 14
3 Cody Bellinger 12
2 Aaron Judge 13
2 Aaron Judge (NYY) 23
7 Justin Bour (MIA) 22

2018 Nationals Park (Washington)

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 Jesús Aguilar (MIL) 12
8 Rhys Hoskins (PHI) 17
8 Rhys Hoskins 20
5 Kyle Schwarber 21
4 Alex Bregman (HOU) 15
5 Kyle Schwarber (CHC) 16
5 Kyle Schwarber 18
2 Bryce Harper 19
3 Max Muncy (LAD) 17
6 Javier Báez (CHC) 16
3 Max Muncy 12
2 Bryce Harper 13
2 Bryce Harper (WAS) 13
7 Freddie Freeman (ATL) 12

2019 Progressive Field (Cleveland)

Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals
         
1 Matt Chapman (OAK) 13
8 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. (TOR) 29
8 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 40*
5 Joc Pederson 39
4 Alex Bregman (HOU) 16
5 Joc Pederson (LAD) 21
8 Vladimir Guerrero Jr. 22
2 Pete Alonso 23
3 Josh Bell (PIT) 18
6 Ronald Acuña Jr. (ATL) 25
6 Ronald Acuña Jr. 19
2 Pete Alonso 20
2 Pete Alonso (NYM) 14
7 Carlos Santana (CLE) 13

* Round went into three swing-offs after Guerrero, Jr. and Pederson were tied 29–all.

See also

References

  1. ^ Baker, Jim (July 7, 1999). "Baseball; ESPN rift with MLB a real derby; Dispute heats up over credentials". Boston Herald. Retrieved July 16, 2013.
  2. ^ "Home Run Derby on ESPN is No. 1 on cable TV". The Seattle Times. Associated Press. July 23, 2008. Archived from the original on July 17, 2013. Retrieved July 16, 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  3. ^ Hiestand, Michael (July 7, 2009). "ESPN adds new graphics for Home Run Derby coverage". USA Today. Retrieved July 16, 2013. Monday's Home Run Derby— often cable TV's highest-rated summer event
  4. ^ Castrovince, Anthony (July 16, 2013). "Cespedes beats Harper to claim Derby title". MLB.com.
  5. ^ Derby to feature bracketed play as part of new format
  6. ^ Keeney, Tim. "HR Derby Gets New Format, Rules". Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  7. ^ "Home Run Derby to introduce new format". Major League Baseball.
  8. ^ Corcoran, Cliff. "Home Run Derby Five-Minute Guide: Everything you need to know". www.si.com. Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  9. ^ Silverman, Steve. "Home Run Derby 2016: Participants, Breakdown of New Rules for All-Star Showcase". Retrieved July 12, 2016.
  10. ^ "The last time Cincinnati hosted the MLB All-Star Game, things got weird". The Sporting News.
  11. ^ "Home Run Derby 2010: Most Memorable Derby Moments". Bleacher Report. July 12, 2010. Retrieved July 13, 2013.
  12. ^ Multichannel.com
  13. ^ Seattle Post-Intelligencer
  14. ^ MLB.com  (July 7, 2015). "2015 Gillette Home Run Derby Presented By Head & Shoulders Exclusively on ESPN". ESPNMediazone.com. Retrieved July 13, 2015.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  15. ^ MLB.com  (July 11, 2011). "Home Run Derby press conference". MLB Advanced Media, LP. Retrieved July 13, 2015.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link)
  16. ^ "Relatively speaking, viewers still love the Home Run Derby (2002-2016 viewership)". sportstvratings.com. Retrieved July 11, 2017.

External links

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