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Hinchley Wood railway station

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hinchley Wood National Rail
Hinchley Wood station geograph-3678160-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
Location
PlaceHinchley Wood
Local authorityElmbridge
Coordinates51°22′34″N 0°20′31″W / 51.376°N 0.342°W / 51.376; -0.342
Grid referenceTQ155652
Operations
Station codeHYW
Managed bySouth Western Railway
Number of platforms2
DfT categoryE
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 0.375 million
2014/15Increase 0.380 million
2015/16Increase 0.399 million
2016/17Decrease 0.387 million
2017/18Decrease 0.358 million
History
Key datesOpened 20 October 1930 (20 October 1930)
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Hinchley Wood from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

Hinchley Wood railway station is in the centre of the compact suburban village of Hinchley Wood in Surrey, England. It is 14 miles 4 chains (22.6 km) down the line from London Waterloo and opened in 1930 after the New Guildford Line first passed through the area in 1885.

It is the northernmost station on the line, following which the line merges into the four-track South Western main line and is outside of the Transport for London area.

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Transcription

Contents

Design and amenities

The station has a hardstanding island layout linked by footbridges from each side of the line. Its layout and simplicity contrasts with older stations further down the line such as Claygate, the next station. The centre platform tapers as tracks curve more to the north after the station, the London-bound track is on a flyover west of Surbiton station enabling grade segregation — fast trains on the main line's middle, fast tracks are not affected by trains entering the slow track from this line.

A modern ticket machine, Help Point and waiting room (open when the station is staffed) exist. The station is staffed from Monday to Friday between 06:30 and 11:00 and covered by Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) at all times. Electronic displays provide updates as to scheduled trains. The station is immediately outside of the area covered by the London Travel Card Zones (and Oyster readers). Buses running on the north/south minor road east of the station are in the London transport schemes, principally the K3 service.

History

The station was first opened on 20 October 1930 by the intersection of the Kingston Bypass.[1] At the time the Bypass was the A3 London-Portsmouth Road. The site is approximately half a mile south of Hampton Court (Branch Line and New Guildford Line) Junction where these opposing lines join the South Western main line. The line was opened on 2 February 1885.[1] Electric service applied from the outset as it was withdrawn during World War I, to be reinstituted along the route from 12 July 1925, before this station opened.[2][1]

Since built, operators have been successively:

  1. Southern Railway (SR)
  2. British Railways (BR)
  3. Network Rail with services franchised to South West Trains.

Services

South Western Railway operate the services (transport of passengers) on the New Guildford Line which includes the station.

In both directions, trains call at the station every 30 minutes during peak and off-peak hours; the half which run to Waterloo call at Surbiton then run fast to Wimbledon then call at all stations apart from Queenstown Road.[3] Additional, faster trains run in peak hours, skipping the stations between Surbiton and London Waterloo. Standard trains are scheduled to take 33 minutes to reach Waterloo.[3] To Guildford from this point trains call at all stops.[3]

References

  1. ^ a b c Mitchell, Vic; Smith, Keith (1 April 1990). Branch Lines around Effingham Junction from Guildford, Leatherhead and Hampton Court. Middleton Press. ISBN 978-0-906520-74-1.
  2. ^ "Suburban Electric Railway Association - History Zone - Southern Suburban Electrification". www.emus.co.uk.
  3. ^ a b c "New Guildford Line timetable" (PDF). South West Trains. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 June 2009. Retrieved 28 May 2009.

External links

Preceding station
National Rail
National Rail
Following station
Surbiton   South Western Railway
Waterloo-Guildford via Cobham
  Claygate
This page was last edited on 14 October 2019, at 20:27
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