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Herman P. Faris

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Herman P. Faris
Herman P. Faris.png
Personal details
Born
Herman Preston Faris

(1858-12-25)December 25, 1858
Bellefontaine, Ohio, U.S.
DiedMarch 20, 1936(1936-03-20) (aged 77)
Deepwater, Missouri, U.S.
Political partyProhibition
Other political
affiliations
Republican (before 1884)
Spouse(s)Adda Winters
Sallie A. Lewis
Children5
MotherSarah Plumber Finks
FatherSamuel D. Faris

Herman Preston Faris (December 25, 1858 – March 20, 1936) was an American businessman and politician who served as treasurer of the Prohibition National Committee, twice as the Prohibition Party candidate for governor of Missouri, and was the party's presidential candidate during the 1924 presidential election.

Life

Herman Preston Faris was born on December 25, 1858 in Bellefontaine, Ohio to Samuel D. Faris and Sarah Plumber Finks and his family later moved to Lawrence, Kansas.[1] He later moved to Clinton, Missouri in 1867, he would temporarliy leave it for Colorado in the 1870s and returned, where he became a successful banker, but suffered financial difficulties shortly before his death. In 1889 he married Adda Winters and later had five children with her and in 1911 he married Sallie A. Lewis.[2]

In 1884 he left the Republican Party and joined the Prohibition Party and afterwards he became active in electoral politics with him running for secretary of state, governor four times, and senator twice. During the 1920 presidential election he ran for the Prohibition Party's vice presidential nomination, but was defeated by D. Leigh Colvin with 108 delegates to 47 delegates. In 1924 he was given the Prohibition Party's presidential nomination with 82 delegates against A.P. Gouttey's 40 and used the slogan slogan "Be Fair With Faris" and received 55,951 votes.[3] During the 1928 presidential election he supported Herbert Hoover and campaigned for him in Texas due to Al Smith's anti-prohibition stances and had expected the Prohibition Party to give its nomination to Hoover rather than to William F. Varney.[4][5]

On March 20, 1936 Faris suffered either a heart attack or a stroke before crashing his car off a bridge at age 77.[6]

Electoral history

Herman P. Faris electoral history
1888 Missouri Secretary of state election[7]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Alexander A. LeSueur 261,301 50.12%
Republican F. W. Mott 236,855 45.43%
Labor Boswell Fox 18,769 3.60%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 4,399 0.84%
Total votes 521,324 100.00%
1896 Missouri gubernatorial election[8]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Lon Vest Stephens 351,062 52.88% +3.90%
Republican Robert E. Lewis 307,729 46.35% +2.85%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 2,588 0.39% -0.24%
National Democratic J. McDowell Trimble 1,809 0.27% +0.27%
Socialist Labor Louis C. Fry 757 0.11% +0.11%
Total votes 663,945 100.00%
1908 Missouri gubernatorial election[9]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Herbert S. Hadley 355,932 49.73% +3.68%
Democratic William S. Cowherd 340,053 47.51% -3.22%
Socialist William L. Garver 14,505 2.03% +0.32%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 4,169 0.58% -0.29%
People's William A. Dillon 1,058 0.15% -0.27%
Total votes 715,717 100.00%
1912 Missouri Sixth Congressional District election[10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Clement C. Dickinson 17,858 52.24% -0.99%
Republican Louis T. Dunaway 9,093 26.60% -17.11%
Progressive G. A. Theilmann 6,788 19.86% +19.86%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 448 1.31% -0.17%
Total votes 34,187 100.00%
1920 Missouri gubernatorial election[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Arthur M. Hyde 722,020 54.25% +5.89%
Democratic John M. Atkinson 580,726 43.64% -5.01%
Socialist Marvin M. Aldrich 19,489 1.46% -0.39%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 3,974 0.30% -0.21%
Farmer–Labor Vaughn Hickman 3,003 0.23% +0.23%
Socialist Labor Edward G. Middlecoff 1,620 0.12%
Total votes 1,330,832 100.00%
1926 Missouri Senate election[12]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Harry B. Hawes 506,015 51.30% -0.79%
Republican George Henry Williams 470,654 47.71% -0.20%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 7,540 0.76% +0.76%
Socialist Robert D. Morrison 1,807 0.18% +0.18%
Socialist Labor William Wesley Cox 464 0.05% +0.05%
Total votes 986,480 100.00%
1932 Missouri Senate election[13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Bennett Champ Clark 1,017,046 63.26% +11.96%
Republican Henry Kiel 575,174 35.78% -11.93%
Socialist Robert D. Morrison 11,441 0.71% +0.53%
Prohibition Herman P. Faris 3,147 0.20% -0.56%
Communist Julius Pollack 533 0.03% +0.03%
Socialist Labor Karl Oberheu 417 0.03% -0.02%
Total votes 986,480 100.00%

See also

References

  1. ^ "H. P. Faris Killed". Henry County Democrat. 26 March 1936. p. 1. Archived from the original on 20 December 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  2. ^ "Remarkable Life". Henry County Democrat. 26 March 1936. p. 6. Archived from the original on 20 December 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Faris, Ex-Prohi Candidate For President, Dies in Crash". The Star Press. 21 March 1936. p. 3. Archived from the original on 20 December 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  4. ^ "Supports Hoover". The Sedalia Democrat. 22 March 1936. p. 6. Archived from the original on 20 December 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  5. ^ "Others: Fighting Bob La Follette and the Progressive Movement: Third-party ..."
  6. ^ "Herman P.Faris Dies In Crash". The Owensboro Messenger. 21 March 1936. p. 1. Archived from the original on 20 December 2019 – via Newspapers.com.
  7. ^ "MO Secretary of State 1888". 24 March 2009.
  8. ^ "MO Governor 1896". 14 August 2007.
  9. ^ "MO Governor 1908". 14 August 2007.
  10. ^ "MO District 6 1912". 21 November 2009.
  11. ^ "MO Governor 1920". 14 August 2007.
  12. ^ "MO US Senate 1926". 20 July 2005.
  13. ^ "MO US Senate 1932". 16 October 2017.
Party political offices
Preceded by
Aaron S. Watkins
Prohibition nominee for President of the United States
1924
Succeeded by
William F. Varney
This page was last edited on 26 December 2019, at 15:08
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