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Herbert Fields

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Herbert Fields
Herbert Fields
Herbert Fields
BornJuly 26, 1897
DiedMarch 24, 1958(1958-03-24) (aged 60)
OccupationScreenwriter, librettist
Parent(s)Lew Fields
RelativesDorothy Fields (sister)
Joseph Fields (brother)

Herbert Fields (July 26, 1897 – March 24, 1958) was an American librettist and screenwriter.

Biography

Born in New York City, Fields began his career as an actor, then graduated to choreography and stage direction before turning to writing. From 1925 until his death, he contributed to the libretti of many Broadway musicals. He wrote the book for most of the Rodgers and Hart musicals of the 1930s and later collaborated with his sister Dorothy on several musicals, including Annie Get Your Gun, Something for the Boys, Up in Central Park, and Arms and the Girl. He won the 1959 Tony Award for Best Musical for Redhead.

Fields wrote the screenplays for a string of mostly B-movies, including Let's Fall in Love (1933), Hands Across the Table (1935), Love Before Breakfast (1936), Fools for Scandal (1938), Honolulu (1939), and Father Takes a Wife (1941). He was also one of several writers who worked on The Wizard of Oz, although he did not receive a screen credit for his contribution.

Herbert Fields was the son of Lew Fields and brother of Dorothy and Joseph Fields. Herbert is a member of the American Theater Hall of Fame.[1]

Additional theatre credits

References

  1. ^ "Theater Hall of Fame Adds Nine New Names". New York Times. November 22, 1988. Retrieved February 6, 2019.

External links


This page was last edited on 25 January 2021, at 05:40
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