To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Henry Vane, 1st Earl of Darlington

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Henry Vane, 1st Earl of Darlington

Arms of Vane.svg
Arms of Vane: Azure, three sinister gauntlets (appaumée) or[1] These are a difference of the arms of the Fane family, Earls of Westmorland from 1624, which show: three dexter gauntlets back affrontée, with identical tinctures
Member of the Great Britain Parliament
for Launceston
In office
1726–1727
Serving with John Freind
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Member of the Great Britain Parliament
for St Mawes
In office
1727–1741
Serving with
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Member of the Great Britain Parliament
for Ripon
In office
1741–1747
Serving with William Aislabie
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Member of the Great Britain Parliament
for County Durham
In office
1747–1753
Serving with George Bowes
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Personal details
Bornc. 1705
Died(1758-03-06)6 March 1758
Political partyWhig
Children

Henry Vane, 1st Earl of Darlington, PC (c. 1705 – 6 March 1758), known as Lord Barnard between 1753 and 1754, was a British politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1726 to 1753 when he succeeded to a peerage as Baron Barnard.

Life

Vane was the eldest son of Gilbert Vane, 2nd Baron Barnard of Raby Castle, Staindrop, county Durham, and his wife, Mary Randyll, daughter of Morgan Randyll of Chilworth, Surrey.[2] His sister Anne Vane was a mistress to George II.[3] He was educated privately. He married Lady Grace Fitzroy, daughter of Charles FitzRoy, 2nd Duke of Cleveland on 2 September 1725.[2]

Career

The south front of Raby Castle
The south front of Raby Castle

Vane contested County Durham as a Whig on his family’s interest at the 1722 British general election, but was unsuccessful. He was brought in by the ministry as Member of Parliament for Launceston at a by-election on 31 May 1726. At the 1727 British general election he planned to stand for county Durham, but stood down to avoid splitting the Whig vote, and the ministry found him another seat at St Mawes where he was returned as MP unopposed. He went into opposition, and attached himself to his wife’s first cousin William Pulteney. He never spoke in the House, which was said to be because of ‘a monstrous tongue which lolled out of his mouth’. He was returned again in a contest for St Mawes at the 1734 British general election, on the Boscawen interest, and, at the 1741 British general election, was returned unopposed as MP for Ripon on the Aislabie interest.

After Walpole’s fall in 1742, Pulteney procured for Vane a lucrative sinecure as Vice-Treasurer and Paymaster General of Ireland and he also became a Privy Counsellor (Ireland) in 1742. Vane lost his Irish post when Pulteney and his adherents were turned out in December 1744. He was finally returned for county Durham at the 1747 British general election as a government supporter. He became a follower of his kinsman, the Duke of Newcastle, cultivating him so assiduously that in 1749 he was appointed a Lord of the Treasury which he retained to 1755. On 27 April 1753 he succeeded to the peerage as 3rd Baron Barnard on the death of his father and became Lord Lieutenant of Durham from 1753 to 1758. He was rewarded by Newcastle with an earldom, as 1st Earl of Darlington and 1st Viscount Barnard on 3 April 1754 and held the post of Joint Paymaster of the Forces between 1755 and 1756.[2]

Death and legacy

Vane died on 6 March 1758. He was succeeded in his titles by his son Henry.[2] With his wife Grace, he had seven children[4]

  1. Hon. Charles Vane
  2. Lady Harriet Vane, died 1758
  3. Lady Mary Vane
  4. Henry Vane, 2nd Earl of Darlington, (1726–8 Sep 1792)
  5. Lady Anne Vane, a botanist, 1726–1776[5]
  6. Hon. Frederick Vane, born 26 Jun 1732
  7. Hon. Raby Vane (2 Jan 1736–3 Oct 1769)

References

  1. ^ Debrett's Peerage, 1968, p.115, which omits appaumée, useful in differentiating from Fane arms; concerning appaumée Cussans (1898) states: "In blazoning a Hand, besides stating what position it occupies, and whether it be the dexter or sinister, and erased or couped, it must be mentioned whether it be clenched or appaumé". (Cussans, John, Handbook of Heraldry, 2nd Edition, London, 1868, p.47 [1], p.92)
  2. ^ a b c d "VANE, Hon. Henry (c.1705-58), of Raby Castle, co. Dur". History of Parliament Online. Retrieved 28 April 2019.
  3. ^ Matthew Kilburn, ‘Vane, Anne (d. 1736)’, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004; online edn, May 2008 accessed 19 Feb 2017
  4. ^ "Henry Vane, 1st Earl of Darlington". /ThePeerage.com. Retrieved 18 March 2015.
  5. ^ "Lady Anne Monson (Biographical details)". British Museum. Retrieved 19 February 2017.

External links

Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
John Willes
John Freind
Member of Parliament for Launceston
1726–1727
With: John Freind
Succeeded by
John King
Arthur Tremayne
Preceded by
Sidney Godolphin
Samuel Molyneux
Member of Parliament for St Mawes
1727–1741
With: John Knight 1727–1728
William East 1728–1734
Richard Plumer 1734–1741
Succeeded by
Robert Nugent
James Douglas
Preceded by
William Aislabie
Thomas Duncombe
Member of Parliament for Ripon
1741–1747
With: William Aislabie
Succeeded by
William Aislabie
Sir Charles Vernon
Preceded by
John Hedworth
George Bowes
Member of Parliament for County Durham
1747–1753
With: George Bowes
Succeeded by
George Bowes
The Hon. Henry Vane
Honorary titles
Vacant
Title last held by
The Bishop of Durham
Lord Lieutenant of Durham
1753–1758
Succeeded by
The Earl of Darlington
Vacant
Title last held by
The Earl of Scarbrough
Vice-Admiral of Durham
1755–1758
Vacant
Title next held by
The Earl of Darlington
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Gilbert Vane
Baron Barnard
1753–1758
Succeeded by
Henry Vane
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
(new creation)
Earl of Darlington
1754–1758
Succeeded by
Henry Vane
This page was last edited on 7 July 2019, at 19:45
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.