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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 Helena Hill Weed, Norwalk, Conn. Serving 3 day sentence in D.C. prison for carrying banner, "Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed."
Helena Hill Weed, Norwalk, Conn. Serving 3 day sentence in D.C. prison for carrying banner, "Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed."

Helena Hill (1875-1958) was an American suffragist, and a member of the National Women's Party. [1] [2] [3] She was the daughter of Connecticut congressman Ebenezer Hill. [2] Her married name was Helena Hill Weed. [3][2] She was among the American suffragists who picketed the White House, and on July 4th, 1917 she became one of the first women to be arrested for doing such, while carrying a banner stating, "Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed."[4] She served three days in prison in Washington, D.C., for this. [4] She was arrested again in January 1918 for applauding in court, for which she served a day in jail. In August of that year she was arrested for participating in the pro-suffrage Lafayette Square meeting at which her sister Elsie Hill spoke, for which Helena served 15 days. [2] [5]

Aside from her work for women's suffrage, Helena Hill was also one of America's first female geologists, having studied at Vassar College and the Montana School of Mines. [2] She was also a founding member of the Women’s National Press Club and a vice-president of the Daughters of the American Revolution, as well as the national secretary of the Haiti-Santo Domingo Independence Society. [6] [2] She also wrote articles in support of Haitian independence for the magazine The Nation. [7]

See also

References

This page was last edited on 29 December 2017, at 17:32.
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