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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hardy Cup
SportIce hockey
Given forSenior "AA"/Intermediate national ice hockey championship
CountryCanada
History
First award1967
Final award1990

The W. G. Hardy Trophy, more commonly referred to as the Hardy Cup, was the Canadian national Intermediate "A" ice hockey championship from 1967 until 1984, and the Canadian national senior championship for Senior "AA" from 1985 until 1990. The Hardy Cup was named for W. G. Hardy, and retired to the Hockey Hall of Fame in 1990.

History

The Canadian Amateur Hockey Association established the W. G. Hardy Trophy in 1968, which became known as the Hardy Cup. It was awarded to the national champion of the intermediate senior division. From 1984 onward, the trophy was awarded to the Senior AA division champions of Canada, after senior and intermediate hockey were merged.[1][2] The trophy was donated by a group of realtors from North Battleford, and retired from competition in 1990.[3]

Until the 1967-68 season, the Intermediate level had many regional championships. The most prominent was for the Edmonton Journal Trophy, the Western Canadian Intermediate "A" Crown. In Ontario, the Intermediate champions were sometimes included in Allan Cup Senior "A" playoffs.[citation needed] Senior "AA" was unsustainable at the national level and the trophy was retired soon after.[citation needed]

Champions

Hardy Cup finals
Year Col. J. Bourque Trophy
Eastern Canada champions
Edmonton Journal Trophy
Western Canada champions
Series Location
1968 Mineurs de Sept-Iles Meadow Lake Stampeders 3-1 North Battleford, Saskatchewan
1969 Loups de La Tuque Lloydminster Border Kings 3-0 La Tuque, Quebec
1970 Olympiques de Val D'Or Powell River Regals 2-3 Powell River, British Columbia
1971 Bathurst Alpine Papermakers Rosetown Red Wings 3-0 Bathurst, New Brunswick
1972 Campbellton Tigers Rosetown Red Wings 3-2 Rosetown, Saskatchewan
1973 Saint John Mooseheads Rosetown Red Wings 3-1 Saint John, New Brunswick
1974 Embrun Panthers Warroad Lakers 0-3 Warroad, Minnesota
1975 Moncton Beavers Thompson Hawks 3-1 Moncton, New Brunswick
1976 Embrun Panthers Prince George Mohawks 3-2 Prince George, British Columbia
1977 Campbellton Tigers Warroad Lakers 3-1 Campbellton, New Brunswick
1978 Campbellton Tigers Prince George Mohawks 1-3 Prince George, British Columbia
1979 Moncton Hawks Quesnel Kangaroos 3-0 Moncton, New Brunswick
1980 Fredericton Capitals Burnaby Lakers 0-3 Vancouver, British Columbia
1981 Charlottetown Islanders Winnipeg North End Flyers 3-0 Winnipeg, Manitoba
1982 Georgetown Raiders Quesnel Kangaroos 3-0 Georgetown, Ontario
1983 Timmins North Stars Winnipeg North End Flyers 0-4 Winnipeg, Manitoba
1984 Charlottetown Islanders Moose Jaw Generals 4-1 Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island
1985 Charlottetown Islanders Moose Jaw Generals 0-4 Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan
1986 Dundas Real McCoys Lloydminster Border Kings 4-0 Dundas, Ontario
1987 Miramichi Packers Stony Plain Eagles 3-0 Miramichi, New Brunswick
1988 Cambellton Tigers Quesnel Kangaroos 4-0 Campbellton, New Brunswick
1989 Port-aux-Basques Mariners Kindersley Klippers 4-1 Port-aux-Basques, Newfoundland
1990 Dartmouth Mounties Paul Band Black Hawks 4-3 Stony Plain, Alberta

Championships by location

This is a list of champions by province, territory, or state. From 1968, the Hardy Cup was awarded 23 times.

Hardy Cups by location
Rank Region Events hosted Final berths Championships
1 New Brunswick 7 10 8
2 British Columbia 4 7 3
- Ontario 2 5 3
4 Prince Edward Island 1 3 2
- Quebec 1 3 2
6 Manitoba 2 3 1
- Minnesota 1 2 1
- Newfoundland and Labrador 1 1 1
- Nova Scotia 0 1 1
- Saskatchewan 3 8 1
11 Alberta 1 3 0

References

General

  • Young, Scott (1989). 100 Years of Dropping the Puck. Toronto, Ontario: McClelland & Stewart Inc. ISBN 0-7710-9093-5.
  • Constitution, By-laws, Regulations, History. Gloucester, Ontario: Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. May 1990.
  • Podnieks, Andrew (2005). Silverware. Bolton, Ontario: Fenn Publishing. ISBN 1-55168-296-6.

Specific

  1. ^ Canadian Amateur Hockey Association (1990). p. 140
  2. ^ Young, Scott (1989), p. 316
  3. ^ Podnieks, Andrew (2005), p. 152
This page was last edited on 24 June 2020, at 05:42
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