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Hamilton Heights, Manhattan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mt Calvary Methodist Church
Mt Calvary Methodist Church
Location in New York City

Hamilton Heights is a neighborhood in the northern part of Manhattan, which is a borough of New York City. It lies between Manhattanville to the south and Washington Heights to the north.[1] It contains the sub-neighborhood of Sugar Hill.

Hamilton Heights is bounded by 135th Street to the south, Riverside Drive to the west, 155th Street to the north, and Edgecombe Avenue to the east. The community derives its name from Founding Father Alexander Hamilton, who lived the last two years of his life in the area when it was still largely farmland; specifically, he lived in what is now known as Hamilton Grange National Monument.[1] It is located within Manhattan Community Board 9.

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  • ✪ Harlem, New York City - Video Tour of Hamilton Heights, Manhattan
  • ✪ ^MuniNYC - West 137th Street & Broadway (Hamilton Heights, Manhattan 10031)
  • ✪ Halstead ProperTV Presents the Hamilton Heights Section of Manhattan
  • ✪ Video Tour of a 1-Bedroom Furnished Apartment in Hamilton Heights, Manhattan
  • ✪ Harlem, New York - Video Tour di Hamilton Heights, Uptown Manhattan

Transcription

Contents

Demographics

Based on data from the 2010 United States Census, the population of Hamilton Heights was 48,520, a decrease of 2,035 (4.0%) from the 50,555 counted in 2000. Covering an area of 367.41 acres (148.69 ha), the neighborhood had a population density of 132.1 inhabitants per acre (84,500/sq mi; 32,600/km2).[2]

The racial makeup of the neighborhood was 10.9% (5,287) White, 32.2% (15,646) African American, 0.2% (119) Native American, 2.2% (1,067) Asian, 0.0% (15) Pacific Islander, 0.4% (178) from other races, and 1.8% (884) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 52.2% (25,324) of the population.[3]

Housing and diversity

Most of the housing dates from the extension of the elevated and subway lines at the end of the 19th and the start of the 20th Century.[1] This fairly elegant housing became less desirable to white residents in the 1930s and 1940s as the population changed from white to black, even though the black residents were just as affluent as the white residents.[1] There are spacious apartment buildings, brownstones and other row houses prominently lining the leafy eastern streets of Hamilton Heights, an area traditionally home to a substantial black professional class. The brownstone revival of the 1960s and 1970s led to a new movement of middle-class blacks in the area. Latinos arrived in large numbers in the 1980s, with Dominicans making up the majority.[1] Today the local population is changing again, with Hispanics constituting a majority of the population followed by African Americans, West Indians and Whites. Gentrification since 2005 has dramatically increased the proportion of non-Hispanic whites. Many actors, artists, teachers, and other professionals now reside in Hamilton Heights.[4]

After the Russian Revolution, especially after the 1940s, many Ukrainians, Russian White émigré, and Polish found their way to New York City. Hamilton Heights had a very heavy population of Eastern European heritages, with a predominantly large amount of Russians living in this immediate area. There were a couple of Russian Orthodox Churches erected, Russian Book stores, bakeries, grocery and delicatessen stores including theatres all along Broadway. The house on the corner of Broadway and west 141st street was known as the "Russian House" (Русский Дом) and a Russian library was on the other corner. During the late 1950s and throughout the 1960s, a lot of these Russians began to move out to suburban areas of New York and New Jersey. The only remaining landmark of this era is the Holy Fathers Russian Orthodox Church Russian Orthodox Church Outside Russia, located on 524 W. 153rd Street,[5] with some notable Russian Americans buried at the bordering Trinity Cemetery, New York City.[4]

Notable sites

Hamilton Heights is the home of City College of New York (CCNY), Dance Theatre of Harlem, The Harlem School of the Arts and Aaron Davis Hall.

The neighborhood offers several parks, including the recently built Riverbank State Park, embedded in Riverside Park which runs along the Hudson River west of Hamilton Heights.

Historic Hamilton Heights comprises the Hamilton Heights Historic District and the Hamilton Heights/Sugar Hill Historic District Extension, both designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. One of the highest hills in Hamilton Heights slopes up from the Hudson River at 155th Street, and contains the Trinity Cemetery.[1] Many individual buildings in the district are also landmarked, including Shepard Hall on the CCNY campus, and the building that once housed The High School of Music & Art.

The Audubon Mural Project paints the neighborhood with images of the birds depicted by John James Audubon in his early 19th century folio The Birds of America.[6]

From the Hudson River
From the Hudson River

Transportation

The New York City Subway's IRT Broadway–Seventh Avenue Line stops in Hamilton Heights at the 137th Street–City College and 145th Street stations (1 train). The IND Eighth Avenue Line runs under St. Nicholas Avenue, providing service at 135th Street (A, ​B, and ​C trains), 145th Street (A, ​B, ​C, and ​D trains) and 155th Street (A and ​C trains). The IND Concourse Line branches off north of the 145th Street station, and runs under Saint Nicholas Place to serve 155th Street (B and ​D trains).[7]

The MTA Regional Bus Operations' M3, M4, M5, M10, M11, M100, M101, Bx6, Bx6 SBS, Bx19 and Bx33 buses serve the area.[8]

Notable people

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Kenneth T. Jackson: The Encyclopedia of New York City: New-York Historical Society; Yale University Press; 1995. P. 519-520.
  2. ^ Table PL-P5 NTA: Total Population and Persons Per Acre - New York City Neighborhood Tabulation Areas*, 2010, Population Division - New York City Department of City Planning, February 2012. Accessed June 16, 2016.
  3. ^ Table PL-P3A NTA: Total Population by Mutually Exclusive Race and Hispanic Origin - New York City Neighborhood Tabulation Areas*, 2010, Population Division - New York City Department of City Planning, March 29, 2011. Accessed June 14, 2016.
  4. ^ a b NYT on Hamilton Heights
  5. ^ "The Parish of the Holy Fathers Church" Archived 2011-12-10 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ Delson, Susan (23 October 2015). "Retracing Audubon's Steps, Painting His Birds Anew". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Subway Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. January 18, 2018. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  8. ^ "Manhattan Bus Map" (PDF). Metropolitan Transportation Authority. December 2017. Retrieved April 24, 2018.

External links

This page was last edited on 27 December 2018, at 21:00
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