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List of subcamps of Flossenbürg

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The expansion of Flossenbürg concentration camp led to the establishment of subcamps, the first of which was established at Stulln in February 1942 to provide forced labor to a mining company. Many of them were located in the Sudetenland or across the border in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia.[1] The vast majority were established after 1 March 1944.[2] Initially, the subcamps were not involved in armaments production, which changed in the second half of 1944 due to a large influx of available prisoners and the activities of the Jägerstab, which sought to increase German aircraft production.[1] The Jägerstab's dispersal of aircraft production spurred the expansion of the subcamp system in 1944[3] and resulted in the establishment of the two largest of the subcamps, at Hersbruck and Leitmeritz.[1] In the second half of 1944, 45 new camps were created, compared to three camps in the previous six months. The staffing these new camps was increasingly filled by Luftwaffe soldiers, Volksdeutsche SS men (ethnic Germans from outside the Reich), and SS women, for the subcamps containing female prisoners.[4] By April 1945, 80% of the prisoners were at the subcamps.[5] Of all the concentration camp systems, Flossenbürg's subcamp system was one of the three most important to the economy of Nazi Germany, along with Dachau's and Mauthausen's.[6]

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List of subcamps

Name Image Location Dates of operation Prisoners Deaths Description
Altenhammer
Altenhammer aerial photograph.jpg
Altenhammer [de], Bavaria 49°43′50.9″N 12°19′35.0″E / 49.730806°N 12.326389°E / 49.730806; 12.326389 Late 1944 or early 1945–16 April 1945 552 (March 1945) More than 45 Began in 1942 as a work detachment from Flossenbürg main camp, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) away, for the Ernst Stich Quarry. In 1944, production lines for parts of the Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighter were established and initially manned by prisoners from the main camp. The barracks were built and prisoners moved in around the end of 1944. The camp was guarded mostly by Luftwaffe guards and conditions were poor. On 16 April 1945 the prisoners were transferred back to the main camp.[7][8]
Ansbach Rezathalle, Ansbach, Bavaria 49°43′50.9″N 12°19′35″E / 49.730806°N 12.32639°E / 49.730806; 12.32639 13 March – 4 April 1945 700 72 Prisoners were held in the Rezathalle fair pavilion and worked at repairing bomb damage to the nearby rail lines. Rations were very low which contributed to the death rate. On 4 April, 93 prisoners were sent to Hersbruck while the rest were sent back to the main camp.[9][10]
Aue Aue, Saxony 49°4′59.884″N 11°16′0.116″E / 49.08330111°N 11.26669889°E / 49.08330111; 11.26669889 24 November 1944 – late April 1945 20 None Skilled Hungarian Jews worked on a project to build an SS leadership training school.[11][12]
Bayreuth [de]
Gedenkstein KZ Außenlager Bayreuth 2018 xy2.jpg
Bayreuth, Bavaria 49°57′0″N 11°34′59.876″E / 49.95000°N 11.58329889°E / 49.95000; 11.58329889 13 June 1944 – 11 April 1945 63 None at the camp. Eleven died as a result of their imprisonment. Prisoners, who had been selected for their skills at Neuengamme, worked at the "Institute of Physical Research", under the leadership of physicist Werner Rambauske [de] to develop remote-controlled bombs at the New Cotton Mill owned by Bodo Lafferentz. Conditions were relatively good, but the role of the Wagner family in the subcamp has attracted interest.[13][14]
Brüx Brüx, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Most, Czech Republic) 50°31′0.48″N 13°31′53.8″E / 50.5168000°N 13.531611°E / 50.5168000; 13.531611 1 September – 7 October 1944 1,000 4 1,000 prisoners arrived on 1 September on a transport from Sachsenhausen. Little is known of the conditions, although prisoners probably worked in coal mines and tank production. On 7 October, they were transferred back to the Flossenbürg main camp and thence to Leitmeritz.[15][16]
Chemnitz
Altchemnitzer Straße 41. Bild 3.JPG
Chemnitz, Saxony 50°49′59.9″N 12°55′0.12″E / 50.833306°N 12.9167000°E / 50.833306; 12.9167000 24 October 1944 – 8 May 1945 510 2 The prisoners, all women who had been transported from Auschwitz, produced metal parts for airplanes and machine guns for Astrawerke [de], 12-hour days six days a week. Nutrition was lacking but the physical brutality of guards was less than elsewhere.[17][18]
Dresden Behelfsheim Dresden, Saxony 51°3′3.6″N 13°44′0.96″E / 51.051000°N 13.7336000°E / 51.051000; 13.7336000 12 April 1945 – 103 Unknown Many of the prisoners were in poor health due to previous imprisonment.[19]
Dresden Bernsdorf
+f6 - Cigaretten Fabrik Dresden - Schandauer Straße 68.jpg
Dresden, Saxony 51°2′31.553″N 13°47′50.6″E / 51.04209806°N 13.797389°E / 51.04209806; 13.797389 24 November 1944 – 14 April 1945 500 16 from mistreatment and additional victims of bombing of Dresden and executions Most prisoners were Polish Jews who came from the Łódź Ghetto via Stutthof. Already in bad condition, they suffered from poor living conditions and forced labor producing machine guns for Bernsdorf & Co. After the bombing of Dresden on 13 February, the prisoners were sent to Mockethal except 50 men who were forced to clear bomb debris.[20][21]
Dresden (SS Engineers' Barracks)
06412-Dresden-1905-Kaserne des 1. Königlich Sächsischen Pionier-Bataillon Nr. 12-Brück & Sohn Kunstverlag (cropped).jpg
Dresden, Saxony 51°5′31.196″N 13°43′47.64″E / 51.09199889°N 13.7299000°E / 51.09199889; 13.7299000 June 1942 – 15 April 1945 198 (December 1943) 3–7 This was the second and longest-lasting of the Flossenbürg subcamps. Prisoners worked mostly on construction for the SS-Bauleitung Dresden but were also drafted for other construction projects and sold to private firms.[22][23]
Dresden Universelle
Fabrikgebäude Universelle-Werke Zwickauer Str. 46 - 1.jpg
Dresden, Saxony 51°2′24.36″N 13°42′56.88″E / 51.0401000°N 13.7158000°E / 51.0401000; 13.7158000 9 October 1944 – mid-April 1945 700 3 Many of the women in the camp had already spent years in other concentration camps. In Dresden, they worked and slept in the same building at 14 Florastrasse, a supplier for Junkers aircraft company. During the bombing of Dresden, some women may have died and others managed to escape, while the remainder were taken to Mockethal and returned in mid-March, at which point they worked in clearing debris.[24][25]
Dresden Goehle-Werk [de]
Goehle-Werk 2016 01.jpg
Dresden, Saxony 51°4′40″N 13°43′39″E / 51.07778°N 13.72750°E / 51.07778; 13.72750 9 October 1944 – mid-April 1945 600 2 Female prisoners, mostly Russian and Polish, worked on producing time fuses, incendiary fragmentation projectiles for antiaircraft cannons, and other weapons. Food rations were insufficient and the female SS guards frequently beat prisoners. In mid-April they were deported to Leitmeritz but all escaped near the Sudeten border.[26][27]
Dresden-Reick Dresden, Saxony 51°00′34″N 13°48′33″E / 51.00944°N 13.80917°E / 51.00944; 13.80917 October 1944 23 There were three murders. The rest of the deaths came mostly from ill Jewish prisoners who were in poor condition due to previous imprisonment at Auschwitz and Bergen-Belsen.[28][29]
Dresden-Friedrichstadt
Luftbild Dresden 06.jpg
Dresden-Friedrichstadt station, Dresden, Saxony 51°03′36″N 13°41′33″E / 51.06000°N 13.69250°E / 51.06000; 13.69250 12 September 1944–late February 1945 597 (November 1944) 89 Prisoners had to repair damaged railroad cars for RAW. Food was inadequate while the SS guards severely mistreated prisoners. Some were shot “while attempting to escape”. [30][31]
Dresden Reichsbahn 24 March–May 1945 500 Prisoners worked also for RAW and lived in five-tiered bunk beds near the railroad station hall. The unsanitary conditions led municipal authorities to fear a typhus epidemic.[32][33]
Eichstätt
Eichstätt, Willibaldsburg, Ansicht von Westen 20170825 003.jpg
Willibaldsburg Castle, Eichstätt, Bavaria 48°53′40.92″N 11°10′7.68″E / 48.8947000°N 11.1688000°E / 48.8947000; 11.1688000 October 1944 – January 1945 22 None The prisoners—Dutch, Polish, and Czech—worked for Nuremberg SS Signal Reserve Battalion and stayed in Willibaldsburg Castle.[34]
Eisenberg
Schloss-Eisenberg-13.jpg
Eisenberg Castle [cs; de], Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Jezeří Castle in the Czech Republic) 50°33′14.94″N 13°30′17.86″E / 50.5541500°N 13.5049611°E / 50.5541500; 13.5049611 21 June 1943 – 27 April 1945 30 None Most prisoners worked in the kitchen for a POW camp for French officers located at the same site. After the SS guards left, the prisoners left the castle and walked to the front line with the United States Army.[35][36]
Falkenau [de] Falkenau an der Eger, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Sokolov, Czech Republic) 50°10′59.88″N 12°37′59.876″E / 50.1833000°N 12.63329889°E / 50.1833000; 12.63329889 December 1943 – around July 1944 750 None Women from a variety of countries produced aircraft parts for Ignaz Schmieger AG. From March 1944, they also built the barracks that would become Zwodau concentration camp. Conditions, especially food, were better than elsewhere, and the women lived in a textile factory. There were 18 Luftwaffe guards and 21 SS women.[37]
Flöha
12091-Plaue-Bernsdorf-1910-Siemsstraße-Brück & Sohn Kunstverlag.jpg
Flöha, Saxony 50°50′54″N 13°04′53″E / 50.84833°N 13.08139°E / 50.84833; 13.08139 18 March 1944–14 April 1945 611 (February 1945) 42 at the camp Prisoners, mostly Russian and French men, worked for the Flöha Tüllfabrik, which had been turned over to production by Erla Maschinenwerk [de], an aircraft manufacturer, in order to disperse production. Some skilled prisoners deliberately sabotaged production despite the risk to themesleves. Fifty-seven prisoners were executed during a death march towards Theresienstadt.[38][39]
Freiberg Freiberg, Saxony 50°55′0.1″N 13°22′0.1″E / 50.916694°N 13.366694°E / 50.916694; 13.366694 31 August 1944 – 14 April 1945 1002 At least 5 The prisoners, mostly Polish Jewish women, arrived on three transports from Auschwitz. They worked for Arado, an aircraft manufacturer. Conditions were fairly good until they were moved to purpose-built barracks in December 1944, but the nutrition was inadequate. In April 1945, remaining prisoners were evacuated to Mauthausen concentration camp.[40][41]
Ganacker [de]
Ganacker-linker-Gedenkstein.jpg
Ganacker [de], Bavaria 48°42′53″N 12°43′34″E / 48.71472°N 12.72611°E / 48.71472; 12.72611 21 February 1945 – 24 or 25 April 1945 500–900 183 Prisoners worked for the Luftwaffe at Ganacker airfield. Initially, they were housed at the airfield, but later they moved to improvised tents in a forest clearing 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) away. Poor housing, insufficient food, as well as a contaminated water supply caused many deaths. Forty-five prisoners, too weak to be moved, were murdered during the evacuation of the camp. Other prisoners died during the death march towards Traunstein.[42][43]
Grafenreuth Grafenreuth [de], Bavaria 49°42′0″N 12°18′9.72″E / 49.70000°N 12.3027000°E / 49.70000; 12.3027000 June 1943–20 or 21 April 1945 150 (August 1944) One Prisoners worked on the nearby Weiden-Floss-Eslarn railway, unloading cars, and others built a clothing factory operated by the SS. The first SS commander, Kübler, embezzled prisoner rations and beat them; his successor Voigt tried to ensure that prisoners were not mistreated. Sick prisoners were transported to Flossenbürg where some died.[44][45]
Graslitz
Kraslice bývalý koncentrační tábor Flossenbürg.jpg
Graslitz, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Kraslice, Czech Republic) 50°19′59.884″N 12°31′0.116″E / 50.33330111°N 12.51669889°E / 50.33330111; 12.51669889 7 August 1944 877 (April 1945) None at the camp Prisoners, many of whom were Romani, did forced labor for Luftfahrtgerätewerk Hakenfelde GmbH, a subsidiary of Siemens which produced aircraft parts including navigation equipment, flight instruments, and electronics. Some prisoners had to clear bomb debris from the railway station in early 1945.[46][47]
Gröditz
Gröditz 2009 sr.jpg
Gröditz, Saxony 51°13′0.124″N 14°37′0.120″E / 51.21670111°N 14.61670000°E / 51.21670111; 14.61670000 27 September 1944 – 17 April 1945 743 (April 1945) 220 as a result of camp conditions, 184 in a massacre Prisoners worked and were quartered in the Mitteldeutsche Stahlwerke [de] factory, which operated on the principle of "extermination through work"—conditions were intended to cause the death of prisoners. On 17 April, 184 prisoners deemed unable to march were shot in the Koselitz sandpits nearby; the remainder were marched to Leitmeritz and Theresienstadt.[48][49]
Gundelsdorf [de]
Mahnmal KZ Außenlager Gundelsdorf - 1 - 2016-02.jpg
Gundelsdorf [de], Bavaria 50°17′5.057″N 11°18′6.167″E / 50.28473806°N 11.30171306°E / 50.28473806; 11.30171306 12 September 1944 – 13 April 1945 121 2 and the camp, 18 at Flossenbürg (all men) Most of the prisoners were Polish Jewish women from Kraków-Płaszów concentration camp; in November 1944, 21 Jewish men arrived. Prisoners were forced to build camp barracks, load and unload trains, and work for an aerial intelligence unit which had been relocated from Płaszów.[50][51]
Hainichen Hainichen, Saxony 50°58′10.034″N 13°7′19.556″E / 50.96945389°N 13.12209889°E / 50.96945389; 13.12209889 8 September 1944 – mid-April 1945 500 5 at the camp, others died during and after the death march The prisoners were mostly Polish and Hungarian Jewish women from Transylvania and Carpathian Ruthenia, who were forced to work for Framo producing machine guns, launchers and mortars. The company paid the SS 4 Reichsmarks daily per prisoner, a total of 42,526 RM. Many of the guards were members of the Russian Liberation Army. In April 1945, they were evacuated to Theresienstadt.[52][53]
Happurg
Doggerstollen Eingang-F 2.jpg
Happurg, Bavaria 49°30′0″N 11°28′0.116″E / 49.50000°N 11.46669889°E / 49.50000; 11.46669889 [54]
Helmbrechts
VolarydeadJews.jpg
Helmbrechts, Bavaria 50°13′54″N 11°42′34″E / 50.23167°N 11.70944°E / 50.23167; 11.70944 [55]
Hersbruck [de]
KZ-Mahnmal bei Schupf1.jpg
Hersbruck, Bavaria 49°30′42.8″N 11°26′37″E / 49.511889°N 11.44361°E / 49.511889; 11.44361 [56]
Hertine Hertine, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Rtyně nad Bílinou, Czech Republic) 50°36′14″N 13°53′18″E / 50.60389°N 13.88833°E / 50.60389; 13.88833 [57]
Hof-Moschendorf Hof, Bavaria 50°17′40″N 11°56′06″E / 50.29444°N 11.93500°E / 50.29444; 11.93500 [58][59]
Hohenstein-Ernstthal Hohenstein-Ernstthal, Saxony 50°47′52″N 12°42′47″E / 50.79778°N 12.71306°E / 50.79778; 12.71306 [60][61]
Hohenthan Hohenthan, Bavaria 49°47′59″N 12°23′04″E / 49.79972°N 12.38444°E / 49.79972; 12.38444 14 February – 22 April 1945 6 None [62]
Holleischen [cs]
Holýšov 002.jpg
Holleischen, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Holýšov, Czech Republic) 49°36′21″N 13°05′54″E / 49.60583°N 13.09833°E / 49.60583; 13.09833 11 The women's camp was dissolved in January 1945 while the men's camp was liberated by Czech partisans on 3 May 1945.[63]
Hradischko [fr] Hradischko, Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (now Hradištko, Czech Republic) 49°52′03″N 14°25′21″E / 49.86750°N 14.42250°E / 49.86750; 14.42250 [64]
Janowitz
Vrchotovy Janovice 2019 (6).jpg
Janowitz, Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (now Vrchotovy Janovice, Czech Republic) 49°40′17″N 14°34′21″E / 49.67139°N 14.57250°E / 49.67139; 14.57250 [65]
Johanngeorgenstadt
Ehemalige KZ-Außenstelle in Johanngeorgenstadt (1).jpg
Johanngeorgenstadt, Saxony 50°25′52″N 12°43′37.6″E / 50.43111°N 12.727111°E / 50.43111; 12.727111 [66]
Jungfern-Breschan Jungfern-Breschan, Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia (now Panenské Břežany, Czech Republic) 50°12′59″N 14°26′32″E / 50.21639°N 14.44222°E / 50.21639; 14.44222 14 February 1944 – 8 May 1945 Liberated by the Red Army on 8 May 1945.[67]
Kirchham Kirchham, Bavaria 48°22′03″N 13°17′06″E / 48.36750°N 13.28500°E / 48.36750; 13.28500 [68]
Königstein [de]
Aerial photo of Festung Königstein, October 2008.jpg
Königstein Fortress, Königstein, Bavaria 50°55′8″N 14°3′24″E / 50.91889°N 14.05667°E / 50.91889; 14.05667 15 November 1944 – 17 March 1945 [69]
Krondorf-Sauerbrunn [de] Krondorf [cs], Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Korunní, Czech Republic) 50°20′24″N 13°4′15.6″E / 50.34000°N 13.071000°E / 50.34000; 13.071000 Forced labor for Sudetenquell GmbH.[70]
Leitmeritz
Krematorium Richard Litomerice CZ 02.JPG
Leitmeritz, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Litoměřice, Czech Republic) 50°32′28″N 14°06′44″E / 50.54111°N 14.11222°E / 50.54111; 14.11222 24 March 1944–8 May 1945 9,000 (April 1945) 4,500 The largest subcamp of Flossenbürg, it was established as part of an effort to disperse and increase war production. Prisoners were forced to work in the caverns Richard I and II, producing Maybach HL230 tank engines for Auto Union (now Audi) and preparing the second site for intended production of tungsten and molybdenum wire and sheet metal by Osram. In the last weeks of the war, the camp became a hub for death marches, until its dissolution by the German surrender.[71]
Lengenfeld [nl] Lengenfeld, Bavaria 50°34′33″N 12°21′01″E / 50.57583°N 12.35028°E / 50.57583; 12.35028 [72]
Lobositz
Lobositz concentration camp prisoner list.jpg
Lobositz, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Lovosice, Czech Republic) 50°30′50″N 14°02′53″E / 50.51389°N 14.04806°E / 50.51389; 14.04806 [73]
Mehltheuer Mehltheuer, Bavaria 50°32′35″N 12°02′09″E / 50.54306°N 12.03583°E / 50.54306; 12.03583 [74]
Meissen-Neuhirschstein
Schloss Hirschstein 005 (cropped).jpg
Neuhirschstein Castle [de; fr], Hirschstein, Saxony 51°15′6.5″N 13°24′1.1″E / 51.251806°N 13.400306°E / 51.251806; 13.400306 [75]
Mittweida Mittweida, Saxony 50°59′04″N 12°57′55″E / 50.98444°N 12.96528°E / 50.98444; 12.96528 [76]
Mockethal-Zatzschke Mockethal [de], Saxony 50°58′58″N 13°57′09″E / 50.98278°N 13.95250°E / 50.98278; 13.95250 [77]
Mülsen St. Micheln Mülsen St. Micheln, Saxony 50°45′04″N 12°34′10″E / 50.75111°N 12.56944°E / 50.75111; 12.56944 [78]
Neurohlau
PamatnikKTNovaRole.jpg
Neurohlau, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Nová Role, Czech Republic) 50°16′37″N 12°46′36″E / 50.27694°N 12.77667°E / 50.27694; 12.77667 [79]
Nossen Nossen, Saxony 51°03′45″N 13°16′39″E / 51.06250°N 13.27750°E / 51.06250; 13.27750 [80]
Nuremberg (SS-Barracks)
Aerial Nuremberg Suedkaserne.jpg
Nuremberg, Bavaria 49°25′49″N 11°05′52″E / 49.43028°N 11.09778°E / 49.43028; 11.09778 [81]
Nuremberg (Siemens-Schuckertwerke)
Nürnberg, Royal Air Force Bomber Command, 1942-1945 CL3097.jpg
Nuremberg, Bavaria 49°24′32″N 11°05′05″E / 49.40889°N 11.08472°E / 49.40889; 11.08472 [82]
Obertraubling
Messerschmitt-Werk Obertraubling (Sommer 1943).jpg
Obertraubling, Bavaria 48°58′54″N 12°11′36″E / 48.98167°N 12.19333°E / 48.98167; 12.19333 See also Regensburg subcamp.[83]
Oederan Oederan, Saxony 50°51′31″N 13°10′43″E / 50.85861°N 13.17861°E / 50.85861; 13.17861 [84]
Plattling
Interpane Plattling.jpg
Plattling, Bavaria 48°46′35″N 12°52′22″E / 48.77639°N 12.87278°E / 48.77639; 12.87278 [85]
Plauen (cotton mill) [de] Plauen, Saxony 50°30′53″N 12°07′38″E / 50.51472°N 12.12722°E / 50.51472; 12.12722 [86]
Plauen (Dr. Th. Horn) [de] Plauen, Saxony 50°31′31″N 12°06′45″E / 50.52528°N 12.11250°E / 50.52528; 12.11250 [87]
Plauen Industriewerke [de] Plauen, Saxony 50°29′36″N 12°06′18″E / 50.49333°N 12.10500°E / 50.49333; 12.10500 [88]
Porschdorf Porschdorf, Saxony 50°56′33″N 14°08′18″E / 50.94250°N 14.13833°E / 50.94250; 14.13833 [89]
Pottenstein
Bundesarchiv Bild 146-1994-024-09, Pottenstein, Gelände des SS-Karstwehr-Bataillons.jpg
Pottenstein, Bavaria 49°45′41″N 11°24′52″E / 49.76139°N 11.41444°E / 49.76139; 11.41444 [90]
Rabstein [cs]
Rabštejn Underground Factory 02.jpg
Böhmisch Kamnitz, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Česká Kamenice, Czech Republic) 50°48′2.8″N 14°23′10″E / 50.800778°N 14.38611°E / 50.800778; 14.38611 Rabstein underground factory [cs][91]
Regensburg
Colosseum 002.jpg
Regensburg, Bavaria 49°1′28.9″N 12°5′50.3″E / 49.024694°N 12.097306°E / 49.024694; 12.097306 aka Außenkommando Colosseum ("Colosseum subcamp").[92]
Reuth Reuth bei Erbendorf, Bavaria 49°50′34″N 12°07′28″E / 49.84278°N 12.12444°E / 49.84278; 12.12444 7 All Jehovah's Witnesses from Germany and the Netherlands.[93]
Rochlitz [de] Rochlitz, Saxony 51°03′03″N 12°47′41″E / 51.05083°N 12.79472°E / 51.05083; 12.79472 [94]
Saal an der Donau
Memorial-Saal-KZ-Flossenbuerg.JPG
Saal an der Donau, Bavaria 48°53′52″N 11°58′04″E / 48.89778°N 11.96778°E / 48.89778; 11.96778 [95]
Schlackenwerth
Ostrov nad Ohří zámek (3).jpg
Schlackenwerth, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Ostrov, Czech Republic) 50°18′30″N 12°56′52″E / 50.30833°N 12.94778°E / 50.30833; 12.94778 [96]
Schönheide Schönheide, Saxony 50°30′11″N 12°31′24″E / 50.50306°N 12.52333°E / 50.50306; 12.52333 3 [97]
Seifhennersdorf Seifhennersdorf, Saxony 50°56′20″N 14°36′27″E / 50.93889°N 14.60750°E / 50.93889; 14.60750 [98]
Siegmar-Schönau
Chemnitz-Schönau, Zwickauer Straße 221, Wanderer-Werke.jpg
Wanderer Works, Siegmar-Schönau [de], Saxony 50°48′59″N 12°50′48″E / 50.81639°N 12.84667°E / 50.81639; 12.84667 [99]
St. Georgenthal St. Georgenthal, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Jiřetín pod Jedlovou, Czech Republic) 50°52′35″N 14°34′25″E / 50.87639°N 14.57361°E / 50.87639; 14.57361 [100]
Steinschönau Steinschönau, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Kamenický Šenov, Czech Republic) 50°46′27″N 14°28′24″E / 50.77417°N 14.47333°E / 50.77417; 14.47333 [101]
Stulln Stulln, Bavaria 49°25′30″N 12°09′14″E / 49.42500°N 12.15389°E / 49.42500; 12.15389 [102]
Venusberg
Gedenkstätte für die Opfer des Faschismus (Venusberg, Drebach) 2.jpg
Venusberg, Saxony 50°41′58″N 13°00′50″E / 50.69944°N 13.01389°E / 50.69944; 13.01389 [103]
Wilischthal Wilischthal [de], Saxony 50°43′29″N 13°03′23″E / 50.72472°N 13.05639°E / 50.72472; 13.05639 [104]
Wolkenburg
Muldentalbahn bei der ehemaligen Papierfabrik in Herrnsdorf (Wolkenburg-Kaufungen) (4).jpg
Wolkenburg [de], Saxony 50°54′00″N 12°40′11″E / 50.90000°N 12.66972°E / 50.90000; 12.66972 [105]
Würzburg
Luitpoldkrankenhaus Würzburg 19.jpg
Würzburg, Bavaria 49°47′09″N 9°57′15″E / 49.78583°N 9.95417°E / 49.78583; 9.95417 [106]
Zschachwitz Zschachwitz [de], Dresden, Saxony 50°59′27″N 13°50′40″E / 50.99083°N 13.84444°E / 50.99083; 13.84444 [107]
Zschopau
25972-Zschopau-1932-DKW - Motorradwerke-Brück & Sohn Kunstverlag retusche (cropped).jpg
DKW-Werke, Zschopau, Saxony 50°44′16″N 13°03′56″E / 50.73778°N 13.06556°E / 50.73778; 13.06556 [108]
Zwickau
Zwickau war monument (aka).jpg
Zwickau, Saxony 50°43′58″N 12°28′29″E / 50.73278°N 12.47472°E / 50.73278; 12.47472 [109]
Zwodau
Svatava pomník ženského koncentračního tábora ve Svatavě srpen 2019 (3).jpg
Zwodau, Reichsgau Sudetenland (now Svatava, Czech Republic) 50°11′43″N 12°37′12″E / 50.19528°N 12.62000°E / 50.19528; 12.62000 [110]

References

Citations

  1. ^ a b c Fritz 2009a, p. 567.
  2. ^ Buggeln 2015, p. 33.
  3. ^ Uziel 2011, p. 182.
  4. ^ Fritz 2009a, p. 568.
  5. ^ Fritz 2009a, p. 569.
  6. ^ Buggeln 2015, p. 11.
  7. ^ Fritz 2009b, p. 570.
  8. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Altenhammer.
  9. ^ Schmidt 2009a, pp. 571–572.
  10. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Ansbach.
  11. ^ Fritz 2009c, pp. 572–573.
  12. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Aue.
  13. ^ Skriebeleit 2009, pp. 573–574.
  14. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Bayreuth.
  15. ^ Fritz 2009d, p. 575.
  16. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Brüx.
  17. ^ Fritz 2009e, pp. 576–577.
  18. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Chemnitz.
  19. ^ Fritz 2009f, pp. 577–578.
  20. ^ Brenner 2009a, pp. 578–579.
  21. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden Bernsdorf.
  22. ^ Fritz 2009g, pp. 580–581.
  23. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden (SS Engineer's Barracks) .
  24. ^ Brenner 2009b, pp. 582–583.
  25. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden Universelle.
  26. ^ Fritz 2009h, pp. 584–585.
  27. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden Goehle-Werk.
  28. ^ Fritz 2009i, pp. 586–587.
  29. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden-Reick.
  30. ^ Fritz 2009j, pp. 588–589.
  31. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden (Railway Repair Works).
  32. ^ Fritz 2009j, p. 589.
  33. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Dresden Reichsbahn.
  34. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Eichstätt.
  35. ^ Adam 2009, p. 590.
  36. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Eisenberg.
  37. ^ Schmolling 2009a, p. 591.
  38. ^ Brenner 2009c, pp. 593–594.
  39. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Flöha.
  40. ^ Brenner 2009d, pp. 595–596.
  41. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Freiberg.
  42. ^ Zegenhagen 2009, pp. 597–598.
  43. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Ganacker.
  44. ^ Fritz 2009k, pp. 598–600.
  45. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Grafenreuth.
  46. ^ Schmolling 2009b, pp. 600–601.
  47. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Graslitz.
  48. ^ Brenner 2009e, p. 603–604.
  49. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Gröditz.
  50. ^ Schmidt 2009b, p. 605.
  51. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg et al.
  52. ^ Brenner 2009f, pp. 605–607.
  53. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hainichen.
  54. ^ Schmidt 2009c, pp. 607–608.
  55. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Helmbrechts.
  56. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hersbruck.
  57. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hertine.
  58. ^ Schmidt 2009d, pp. 612–613.
  59. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hof-Moschendorf.
  60. ^ Brenner 2009g, p. 613–614.
  61. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hohenstein-Ernstthal.
  62. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hohenthan.
  63. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Holleischen.
  64. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Hradischko.
  65. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Janowitz.
  66. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Johanngeorgenstadt.
  67. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Jungfern-Breschan.
  68. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Kirchham.
  69. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Königstein.
  70. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Krondorf-Sauerbrunn.
  71. ^ Skriebeleit 2009, p. 627.
  72. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Lengenfeld.
  73. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Lobositz.
  74. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Mehltheuer.
  75. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Neuhirschstein.
  76. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Mittweida.
  77. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Mockethal-Zatzschke.
  78. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Mülsen St. Micheln.
  79. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Neurohlau.
  80. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Nossen.
  81. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Nuremberg (SS-Barracks).
  82. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Nuremberg (Siemens-Schuckertwerke).
  83. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Obertraubling.
  84. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Oederan.
  85. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Plattling.
  86. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Plauen (cotton mill).
  87. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Plauen (Dr. Th. Horn).
  88. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Plauen Industriewerke.
  89. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Porschdorf.
  90. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Pottenstein.
  91. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Rabstein.
  92. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Regensburg.
  93. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Reuth.
  94. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Rochlitz.
  95. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Saal an der Donau.
  96. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Schlackenwerth.
  97. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Schönheide.
  98. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Seifhennersdorf.
  99. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Siegmar-Schönau.
  100. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, St. Georgenthal.
  101. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Steinschönau.
  102. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Stulln.
  103. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Venusberg.
  104. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Wilischthal.
  105. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Wolkenburg.
  106. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Würzburg.
  107. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Zschachwitz.
  108. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Zschopau.
  109. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Zwickau.
  110. ^ KZ-Gedenkstätte Flossenbürg 2020, Zwodau.

Encyclopedia of Camps and Ghettos

Other

Further reading

  • Adam, Alfons (2013). "Die Arbeiterfrage soll mit Hilfe von KZ-Häftlingen gelöst werden": Zwangsarbeit in KZ-Außenlagern auf dem Gebiet der heutigen Tschechischen Republik ["The labor question should be solved with the help of concentration camp prisoners": Forced labor in the subcamps on the territory of what is now the Czech Republic] (in German). Metropol-Verlag. ISBN 978-3-86331-083-7.
  • Benz, Wolfgang, ed. (2007). Flossenbürg: das Konzentrationslager Flossenbürg und seine Außenlager [Flossenbürg: Flossenbürg Concentration Camp and its Subcamps] (in German). Munich: C. H. Beck. ISBN 978-3-406-56229-7.
This page was last edited on 12 October 2021, at 21:32
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