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Habershon and Fawckner

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mansion House (originally The Grove), Cardiff (1896)
Mansion House (originally The Grove), Cardiff (1896)

Habershon & Fawckner or Habershon, Pite & Fawckner was a British architectural practice active in England and Wales from the 1860s, particularly in Cardiff and the South Wales area. They had had offices in London, Cardiff and Newport, designing a large number of houses, villas and non-conformist chapels.

Background

William Gilbee Habershon (c.1818–1891) began practising in St Neots, Huntingdonshire in 1843, in partnership with his brother Edward. The brothers were the sons of the architect Matthew Habershon.[1] Mathew Habershon, as well as working in London, had already established an office in Newport. By the time of their father's death in 1852, the two sons were practising from 38 Bloomsbury Square in London and presumably had inherited their father's practice.[2] In 1852 William Habershon was elected an FRIBA and Edward an ARIBA. The partnership between the brothers was dissolved in 1863 and William Habershon formed a new partnership with one of his pupils, Alfred Robert Pite (b. 1832-1911). James Follet Fawckner (c.1828–1898) became a partner (though he was not a registered architect) in 1870[3] – he had been part of the Habershon company since 1857.[4] After Pite retired aged 45, the practice continued as Habershon & Fawckner. The business had offices in London, Cardiff and Newport, Wales[3] (W.G. & E. Habershon had previously run an office in High Street, Cardiff).[5] The Newport office was run by Fawckner, who was probably responsible for the firms South Wales chapels.[4] After Habershon's death in 1891 Fawckner became the senior partner.[6]

Habershon Street, Splott, Cardiff, named after William Habershon
Habershon Street, Splott, Cardiff, named after William Habershon

The firm (preceded by W.G. & E. Habershon) were architects for the Tredegar Estate in South Wales.[7] They laid out large parts of Cardiff with parallel streets of villas for the middle classes.[8] They included the streets around The Parade, The Walk, Richmond Road and Richmond Crescent (now in Roath) named 'Tredegarville' at the time.[9] Cardiff's working class residential area of Splott was laid out by Habershon & Fawckner[10] between 1875 and 1899, with the firm basing themselves at the Tredegar Estate offices on Pearl Street.[5] They were responsible for over 1700 houses. Habershon's name was given to Habershon Street, while Hinton Street may have been named after Fawckner's son, Edgar Hinton Fawckner.[5]

The company was busy in Newport, building three Anglican churches and at least fourteen chapels between 1857 and 1907.[11]

In 1891 Habershon & Fawckner designed a mansion on Richmond Crescent, Cardiff, named 'The Grove' (later 'The Mansion House' and home of the city mayor), for shop owner James Howell and family. The mansion included Roccoco detailing and an unusual double front entrance in case the house needed to be divided at a future date.[8]

Notable buildings

As Habershon & Pite

As Habershon, Pite & Fawckner

Summerhill Baptist Church, Albert Avenue, Newport
Summerhill Baptist Church, Albert Avenue, Newport
  • Summerhill Baptist Church, Newport (1866) [12]
  • Brunswick Methodist Church, Swansea (1872–3) [16]
  • St Mark's Church, Gold Tops, Newport (1872–74) and Vicarage (1877) [12]
  • Beechwood House, Newport (1877–78),[17] a mansion for former Mayor of Newport, George Fothergill.

As Habershon & Fawckner

St Michael and All Angels Church, Partridge Green (1890)
St Michael and All Angels Church, Partridge Green (1890)

As Habershon, Fawckner & Groves

  • Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Commercial Road, Newport (1899) [26]
  • Clytha Primary School, Newport (1900–1) [27]
  • St Andrews United Reformed Church, Wellfield Road, Cardiff (1899–1901) [28]
  • Queen Victoria Memorial (almshouses), Stow Hill, Newport (1901–2) [29]

As Habershon, Fawckner & Co.

  • United Reformed Church, Pen-y-wain Road, Roath Park, Cardiff (1909–10) [30]

References

  1. ^ Colvin H. A. (1995) Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600–1840, Yale University Press, 3rd edition London, 442-3
  2. ^ Antonia Brodie (ed) (2001) Directory of British Architects, 1834–1914: Vols.1, British Architectural Library, Royal Institute of British Architects, pp805-6
  3. ^ a b "Habershon, Pite & Fawckner". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. Retrieved 2014-11-07.
  4. ^ a b "Architects and Artists H - W G Habershon M E Habershon". Sussexparishchurches.org. Archived from the original on 2013-11-09. Retrieved 2014-11-08.
  5. ^ a b c Childs, Jeff (2012), "Architects" (eBook), Roath, Splott and Adamsdown: One Thousand Years of History, The History Press, ISBN 978-0-7524-8257-6
  6. ^ "James Follet Fawckner". Dictionary of Scottish Architects. Retrieved 2014-11-08.
  7. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 105
  8. ^ a b c Mortimer, Dic (2014), "10 - Roath (including Cyncoed and Lakeside)" (eBook), Cardiff: The Biography, Amberley Publishing, ISBN 978-1-4456-4251-2, retrieved 2014-11-07
  9. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 309
  10. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 311
  11. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 428
  12. ^ a b c d e Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, pp. 431–435
  13. ^ a b Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 278
  14. ^ Source: Listing description for TR College)
  15. ^ Lloyd & Pevsner 2006, p. 145.
  16. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 586
  17. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 457
  18. ^ "Diocese of Southwark, Brixton St Paul" (PDF).
  19. ^ "St Paul, Santley Street, Brixton (former) now Seventh Day Adventist". London Churches in photographs. 2014-11-07. Retrieved 2021-01-02.
  20. ^ Newman, John (1995), The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, Penguin Books, p218
  21. ^ a b Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 449
  22. ^ "Survey of London: volume 37: Northern Kensington - CHAPTER XII - The Portobello and St. Quintin Estates". British History Online. Retrieved 9 November 2014.
  23. ^ "A New Church For Partridge Green. Interesting Ceremony". The Sussex Express. 3 June 1890. p. 8. Retrieved 2014-11-11 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  24. ^ "Opening Of A New Market At Barry". Western Mail. 12 December 1890. p. 6. Retrieved 2014-11-11 – via British Newspaper Archive.
  25. ^ "Splott Road English Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, Habershon Street; Barnaby Street, Cardiff". RCAHMW. Retrieved 8 November 2014.
  26. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 436
  27. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 442
  28. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 302
  29. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Gwent/Monmouthshire, p. 452
  30. ^ Newman, The Buildings of Wales: Glamorgan, p. 304

Sources

This page was last edited on 9 April 2021, at 05:05
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