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Governor of British Mauritius

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Governor of Mauritius
Flag of the Governor of Mauritius (1906–1968).svg
Governor of Mauritius Flag (1906-1968)
AppointerGovernment of the United Kingdom
PrecursorGovernor of Isle de France
Formation12 April 1810; 209 years ago (1810-04-12)
First holderSir Robert Farquhar
Final holderSir John Shaw Rennie
Abolished12 March 1968; 51 years ago (1968-03-12)
SuccessionGovernor-General of Mauritius

The British Governor of Mauritius was an official who ruled British Mauritius (now Republic of Mauritius) during the British colonial period between 1810 and 1968. Upon the end of British rule and the independence of Mauritius in 1968, this office was replaced by the Governor-General, who represented the British Monarch and not the Government of the United Kingdom as did the Governor. The office of Governor-General was itself abolished in 1992 and replaced by the post of President when Mauritius became a Republic.

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Transcription

This is the Island nation of Sri Lanka. And this is Colombo, the Capital of that country. And in the heart of this city lies a small suburb officially known as the 'company street' by the Brits, Or as 'Compagnie Wegje' by the Dutch and the current government. Today it is a bustling commercial area with upscale hotels and shopping malls. But to its city dwellers, it is known as Slave Island. Only, most of them don't exactly know where & how that name came to be. And today it is no longer an island. We all are very aware of the Trans-Atlantic slave trade and its consequences. Throughout the years there has been much historical research, social movements, great movies and many depictions that cover the forced migration of between 12 - 15 million people from Africa to the Western Hemisphere. And yes, If you read the title, it was not fully clickbait, kindaaa? We hardly hear about the slave trade occurred in the Indian Ocean Basin in the same period of time. And we hardly hear about the trading of the so-called 'coloured slaves'. And frankly, that's because this area of research is at its early stages and there's an ongoing movement by many historians to give a voice to the this 'silenced' segment of slaves. So this small video is about a small sliver of that story now being uncovered. Prior to the abolition of slavery in 1843 in the United Kingdom, Colombo had a great population of slaves. Yes, although Britain passed the Slavery Abolition Act in 1833, around Sri Lanka, or Ceylon as it was called back then, they had some clear problems doing that until a decade later. You see, the Portuguese who ruled from 1517 had great trouble cultivating and transforming the land around the fortifications in the city due to constant wars with the natives. The Portuguese did what was prudent, and sourced to bonded slaves which they brought or bought from the colony of Mozambique. When the Dutch East India Company ousted them in 1656, the Dutchmen stuck to the Portuguese solution and imported slaves to Colombo which worked well with their policy of not to enslaving indigenous subjects of the Company territories. Now, the Slave Island has, for a lack of a better word, an interesting history behind it. Let's turn to this colonial writer Alan Walters, who in his book 'Palms and Pearls or Scenes in Ceylon' describes how this island got its name... "One night in the old slave times before the year 1844. The Kafir slaves in a certain house in the Fort, in consequence of cruel treatment, rose and murdered a whole family. Thenceforth, the slaves were every evening put into punts at sunset, and rowed to what was then an island, where they were kept under safeguard until the morning." The Dutchmen, after this incident fearing for their lives that a Kafir Slave might knife them to death in the dead of the night, confined their slaves to an area called 'Kaffirse Veldt' (Field of Slaves) and infested the surrounding lake with crocodiles and installed a huge gibbet to remind the slaves of what will become of them if they attempt to escape. Now, most of the stories about slavery in Colombo are most likely lost... This is not very surprising. Foremost there has never been any civil movement such as we come to see in the Americas for the emancipation of slaves. And the only records that exist today are criminal records of different slaves which are always written from the perspective of their masters accusing and dehumanising the subjects, almost all would remain nameless in these annals. However, we do know that, the bonded slaves in Colombo, had a much different life to that compared to say those in the cape or the Caribbean. A segment of slaves was even provided a promise of freedom after one year of faithful service. This was unusual for the time, to say the least, and the Dutch would come to regret it later when they will face severe slave shortages. As much as 10000 slaves were put to work by 1661 and slaves constituted more than half of the population in Colombo clearly depicting the dependency of Colombo on Slave Labour. This high proportion could be compared to the situation in 18th century Cape or that of South Carolina. Colombo would serve as a hub for the officers in Batavia, today Jakarta, to host their slave trade under the noses of the VOC. There are accounts of these officers forcefully hijacking and enslaving whole passenger vessels as slaves. Now unlike the Portuguese who sorted to supply from East African Coast. The Dutch in Ceylon, mostly, did not import slaves from the African circuit, although the details are notoriously blurry and controversial, we now have evidence showing that these slaves were sourced from the areas of India such as Malabar, Coromandel and Bengal coasts and from Southeast Asian origins encompassing Malaysia, Indonesia, New Guinea, and the Southern Philippines. While the South East Asian slave-making is similar to that of the so-called African Circuit (which is usually by force), the bouts of the South Asian slave making is quite different, as they were usually the products of hard times: Individuals either sold themselves or family members into slavery in times of famine or strife. Around 1660 saw a boom in the trading of salves in the region, with tens of thousands of salves been shipped to and from Colombo, mostly coming from South India. By the turn of the decade this easy supply of voluntary bondage had dried up and the VOC would sort to traditional supplies of enslavement such as slave raiding and debt bondage in Indonesia. Eastern Indonesia replaced South Asia as the main source of slaves for Batavia which also made more sense logistically as Colombo was much further to the new Batavian Hub. Also, the much more lucrative trades in the Trans-Atlantic route placed increasingly less significance on Colombo which no longer showed much promise to the VOC investors. The British take-over of Ceylon marked the slow demise of the Slave trade in Colombo and after the passage of time, the slaves metamorphosed into coolies and then to the statuses of migrant labourers and on to indentured labourers. However, if you ever visit Sri Lanka, and you should, now you'll know why this piece of their capital is discreetly called as Slave-Island. If you like this video don't forget to give it a like. And if you want to know about some other Kooky bit of knowledge, consider subscribing to the channel and hitting the bell button. Oh, and I'd love to know about some specific topics you'd want me to cover and what to improve on my upcoming videos! I'll see you next time!

Contents

List of Governors (1810–1968)

A list of British Governors of Mauritius from 1810 to 1968.[1][2]

# Incumbent Portrait Tenure
Took office Left office
British Mauritius
1. Sir Robert Farquhar 4 December 1810 20 May 1823
Henry Warde
Acting for Farquhar
18 April 1811 15 July 1811
Gage John Hall
Acting for Farquhar
10 November 1817 10 December 1818
Sir John Dalrymple
Acting for Farquhar
10 December 1818 6 February 1819
Sir Ralph Darling
Acting for Farquhar
General Ralph Darling.jpg
6 February 1819 6 July 1820
Sir Ralph Darling
Acting
General Ralph Darling.jpg
20 May 1823 12 June 1823
2. Sir Galbraith Lowry Cole
Sir Galbraith Lowry Cole by William Dyce.jpg
12 June 1823 17 June 1828
3. Sir Charles Colville
Sir Charles Colville.jpg
17 June 1828 3 February 1833
4. Sir William Nicolay 4 February 1833 20 February 1840
James Power
Acting
20 February 1840 16 July 1840
5. Sir Lionel Smith 16 July 1840 2 January 1842
William Staveley
Acting
3 January 1842 21 November 1842
6. Sir William Maynard Gomm
Sir William Maynard Gomm by William Salter.jpg
21 November 1842 5 May 1849
Thomas Blanchard
Acting
5 May 1849 8 June 1849
7. Sir George William Anderson 8 June 1849 19 October 1850
William Sutherland
Acting
19 October 1850 8 January 1851
8. Sir James Macaulay Higginson 8 January 1851 20 September 1857
William Sutherland
Acting for Higginson
14 April 1854 18 January 1855
C.M. Hay
Acting for Higginson
18 January 1855 12 June 1855
9. Sir William Stevenson 20 September 1857 9 January 1863
M.G. Johnstone
Acting
10 January 1863 21 August 1863
10. Sir Henry Barkly
Henry Barkly.jpg
21 August 1863 3 June 1870
E. Selby Smith
Acting
4 June 1870 21 February 1871
11. Sir Arthur Charles Hamilton-Gordon
Sir Arthur Hamilton Gordon.jpg
21 February 1871 18 August 1874
E. Selby Smith
Acting for Hamilton-Gordon
4 June 1870 21 February 1871
Edward Norton
Acting for Hamilton-Gordon
21 October 1871 28 October 1872
Edward Norton
Acting for Hamilton-Gordon
20 January 1873 20 October 1873
Edward Norton
Acting
18 August 1874 21 September 1874
12. Sir Arthur Purves Phayre 21 September 1874 31 December 1878
Sir Frederick Napier Broome
Acting
Broome and Barker.jpg
31 December 1878 4 April 1879
13. Sir George Ferguson Bowen
George Bowen b.jpg
4 April 1879 9 December 1880
14. Sir Frederick Napier Broome
Broome and Barker.jpg
9 December 1880 5 May 1883
Sir Charles Bruce
Acting
5 May 1883 1 June 1883
15. Sir John Pope Hennessy
Suspended from 14 December 1886 until 12 July 1887
John Pope Hennessy family.jpg
1 June 1883 11 December 1889
Henry Nicholas Duverger-Beyts
Acting for Hennessy
24 September 1884 15 October 1884
Henry Nicholas Duverger-Beyts
Acting for Hennessy
29 September 1886 12 December 1886
Sir Hercules George Robert Robinson
Acting for Hennessy
LordRosmead.jpg
15 December 1886 18 December 1886
William Hanbury Hawley
Acting for Hennessy
18 December 1886 2 July 1887
Sir Francis Fleming
Acting for Hennessy
2 July 1887 11 December 1888
T.E.A. Hall
Acting for Hennessy
11 December 1888 22 December 1888
Sir Francis Fleming
Acting
11 December 1889 17 December 1889
T.E.A. Hall
Acting
17 December 1889 20 December 1889
16. Sir Charles Cameron Lees 21 December 1889 12 March 1892
Sir Hubert Edward Henry Jerningham
Acting
12 March 1892 20 September 1892
17. Sir Hubert Edward Henry Jerningham 20 September 1892 15 January 1897
Charles Anthony King-Harman
Acting for Jerningham
17 January 1894 24 July 1894
Charles Anthony King-Harman
Acting for Jerningham
2 March 1896 19 September 1896
Charles Anthony King-Harman
Acting
15 January 1897 11 May 1897
18. Sir Charles Bruce 11 May 1897 30 October 1903
Sir Graham John Bower
Acting for Bruce
Sir Graham Bower.png
12 July 1900 11 May 1901
Sir Graham John Bower
Acting
Sir Graham Bower.png
30 October 1903 20 August 1904
19. Sir Charles Cavendish Boyle
Sir Cavendish Boyle.jpg
20 August 1904 10 April 1911
Sir Graham John Bower
Acting for Boyle
Sir Graham Bower.png
14 April 1906 14 September 1906
Sir Graham John Bower
Acting for Boyle
Sir Graham Bower.png
17 October 1908 23 April 1909
George Smith
Acting
10 April 1911 13 September 1911
20. Sir John Robert Chancellor
John Chancellor British High Commissioner 1931.jpg
13 September 1911 28 January 1916
Sir John Middleton
Acting for Chancellor
10 March 1914 22 September 1914
Sir John Middleton
Acting for Chancellor
28 January 1916 18 May 1916
21. Sir Henry Hesketh Joudou Bell 18 May 1916 16 August 1924
Sir John Middleton
Acting for Bell
8 February 1919 17 November 1919
Sir Edward Brandis Denham
Acting for Bell
2 February 1921 3 April 1921
Sir Edward Brandis Denham
Acting for Bell
8 May 1922 3 March 1923
Sir Edward Allan Grannum
Acting
16 August 1924 19 February 1925
22. Sir Herbert James Read 19 February 1925 9 December 1929
Sir Edward Allan Grannum
Acting for Read
2 September 1926 17 October 1926
Sir Edward Allan Grannum
Acting for Read
3 August 1927 17 May 1928
Sir Edward Allan Grannum
Acting
9 December 1929 30 August 1930
23. Sir Wilfrid Edward Francis Jackson 30 August 1930 7 June 1937
Edward Walter Evans
Acting for Jackson
24 August 1932 29 April 1933
Edward Walter Evans
Acting for Jackson
3 September 1934 26 October 1934
Edward Walter Evans
Acting for Jackson
7 April 1936 4 December 1936
Edward Walter Evans
Acting
7 June 1937 23 October 1937
24. Sir Bede Edward Hugh Clifford
Bede Edmund Hugh Clifford.jpg
23 October 1937 16 April 1942
Sydney Moody
Acting for Clifford
29 January 1940 10 September 1940
Sydney Moody
Acting
16 April 1942 5 July 1942 1940
25. Sir Donald Mackenzie-Kennedy 5 July 1942 5 December 1948
Sydney Moody
Acting for Mackenzie-Kennedy
23 May 1945 3 January 1946
Sydney Moody
Acting for Mackenzie-Kennedy
8 May 1947 10 January 1948
Sir James Dundas Harford
Acting
5 December 1948 26 September 1949
26. Sir Hilary Rudolph Robert Blood 26 September 1949 11 January 1954
Sir James Dundas Harford
Acting for Blood
26 June 1950 17 November 1950
Sir James Dundas Harford
Acting for Blood
22 May 1952 14 October 1952
Sir Robert Newton
Acting
11 January 1954 22 March 1954
27. Sir Robert Scott 22 March 1954 10 July 1959
Sir Robert Newton
Acting for Scott
8 November 1956 18 April 1957
Sir Robert Newton
Acting
10 July 1959 2 November 1959
28. Sir Colville Montgomery Deverell 2 November 1959 10 July 1962
Thomas Douglas Vickers
Acting for Deverell
11 June 1961 20 July 1961
Thomas Douglas Vickers
Acting
10 July 1962 17 September 1962
29. Sir John Shaw Rennie 17 September 1962 12 March 1968
Thomas Douglas Vickers
Acting for Rennie
24 August 1964 30 November 1964
Thomas Douglas Vickers
Acting for Rennie
11 October 1966 28 December 1966

Flag of the Governor

See also

References

  1. ^ "Mauritius". Worldsstatesmen.org. Archived from the original on 9 June 2009. Retrieved 26 January 2013.
  2. ^ "Governors". Rulers.org. Retrieved 26 January 2013.
This page was last edited on 14 November 2019, at 12:46
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