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List of glassware

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Typical glassware
Typical glassware

The list of glassware[1] includes drinking vessels (drinkware) and tableware used to set a table for eating a meal, general glass items such as vases, and glasses used in the catering industry. It does not include laboratory glassware.

Drinkware

Drinkware, beverageware (in other words, cups) is a general term for a vessel intended to contain beverages or liquid foods for drinking or consumption.[2]

The word cup comes from Middle English cuppe, from Old English, from Late Latin cuppa, drinking vessel, perhaps variant of Latin cupa, tub, cask.[2] The first known use of the word cup is before the 12th century.[4]

Tumblers

A classic 20-facet Soviet table-glass, produced in the city of Gus-Khrustalny since 1943.
A classic 20-facet Soviet table-glass, produced in the city of Gus-Khrustalny since 1943.

Tumblers are flat-bottomed drinking glasses.

  • Collins glass, for a tall mixed drink[5]
  • Dizzy Cocktail glass, a glass with a wide, shallow bowl, comparable to a normal Cocktail glass but without the stem
  • Highball glass, for mixed drinks[6]
  • Iced tea glass
  • Juice glass, for fruit juices and vegetable juices.
  • Old Fashioned glass, traditionally, for a simple cocktail or liquor "on the rocks". Contemporary American "rocks" glasses may be much larger, and used for a variety of beverages over ice
  • Shot glass, a small glass for up to four ounces of liquor. The modern shot glass has a thicker base and sides than the older whiskey glass
  • Table-glass or stakan granyonyi
  • Water glass
  • Whiskey tumbler, a small, thin-walled glass for a straight shot of liquor

Beer glassware

Whisky tasting glass
Whisky tasting glass
  • Beer stein – large mug traditionally with a hinged lid
  • Pilsner glass, for pale lager
  • Pint glass, for an Imperial pint of beer or cider
  • Pony glass, for a 140ml of beer, a "short" or "small" beer
  • Tankard, a large drinking cup, usually with a handle and a hinged cover
  • Wheat beer glass, for wheat beer (Weizenbier)
  • Yard glass, a very tall, conical beer glass, with a round ball base, usually hung on a wall when empty
  • Handle – 425ml New Zealand beer glass
  • Jug – 750–1000ml served at pubs in New Zealand
  • Middy – 285ml (10 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (New South Wales)
  • Glass – 200ml (7 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (Queensland and Victoria)
  • Pot – 285ml (10 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass (Queensland and Victoria).
  • Schooner – 425ml (15 fl. oz.) Australian beer glass, 285 ml (10 fl. oz.) in South Australia

Stemware

A margarita glass
A margarita glass

Other

A variety of drinking glasses
A variety of drinking glasses
  • Art glass, glassware that is modern art
  • Glass container, container made from glass
  • Laboratory glassware, a variety of equipment, traditionally made of glass, used for scientific experiments
  • Pitcher, a container, usually with a spout for pouring its contents
  • Punch bowl, a bowl that punch is put in, generally used in parties
  • Vase, an open container often used to hold flowers
  • Bong, a smoking device often made from glass
  • Peking glass, a Chinese form of Overlay glass, often in the form of snuff boxes or vases.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Glassware". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-20.
  2. ^ a b "Cups". The Free Dictionary By Farlex. Retrieved 2012-05-20.
  3. ^ McClenehan, Robert L. Some Scottish Quaichs. Illinois, 1955, p. 3.
  4. ^ "Cup". Merriam Webster. Retrieved 2012-05-20.
  5. ^ Herbst, Sharon; Herbst, Ron (1998). The Ultimate A-to-Z Bar Guide. New York: Broadway Books. p. 8. ISBN 978-0-7679-0197-0.
  6. ^ Rathbun, A. J. (2007). Good Spirits: Recipes, Revelations, Refreshments, and Romance, Shaken and Served with a Twist. Boston, Massachusetts: The Harvard Common Press. p. 13. ISBN 978-1-55832-336-0.
  7. ^ Martin McGookin @ http://www.Glencairn.co.uk. "THE OFFICIAL Whisky Glass - The only way to drink Whisky/Whiskey!". Whiskyglass.com. Retrieved 2014-05-20.

External links

This page was last edited on 27 November 2020, at 20:51
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