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Gitta Discovers Her Heart

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gitta Discovers Her Heart
German film poster
GermanGitta entdeckt ihr Herz
Directed byCarl Froelich
Written by
Produced byFriedrich Pflughaupt
Starring
CinematographyCurt Courant
Edited by
Music byNicholas Brodszky
Production
company
Carl Froelich-Film
Distributed byMetropol-Filmverleih
Release date
  • 5 April 1932 (1932-04-05)
Running time
95 minutes
CountryGermany
LanguageGerman

Gitta Discovers Her Heart (German: Gitta entdeckt ihr Herz) is a 1932 German musical film directed by Carl Froelich and starring Gitta Alpar, Gustav Fröhlich, and Paul Kemp.[1] It was shot at the Johannisthal Studios in Berlin. The film's sets were designed by the art director Franz Schroedter.

Plot

While looking for new members in a small Hungarian village, the Prímás of a music ensemble comes across the young Gitta Farkas, who confidently performs her song with a beautiful voice. She is accepted and soon becomes a celebrated revue star. In the period that followed, she traveled the world with the ensemble.

During a train ride to a guest performance in Berlin, Prímás Gitta tries to get closer. However, she rejects him and leaves the train in Berlin before the destination station. After boarding a double-decker bus, she strikes up a conversation with her neighbor Peter, a young composer, to whom she suggests that he shouldn't compose so serious things. When she has to get off - without a ticket and without money - Peter also gets out and takes her home. Peter sneaks with Gitta past the party his wealthy father is giving to the upper floor and rehearses the song that Gitta is humming to him on his grand piano.

While Peter is then taken over by the guests, Gitta drapes a large silk scarf around her body and mingles with the guests, where the master of the house greets her delightedly. When her “dress” comes loose at the back and his father confronts Peter about Gitta, he leaves the house angrily with Gitta, but lets his father know beforehand that he now wants to make his own way through life. At the door, he meets his friend Fred, who wants to borrow money from him. Fred takes Peter and Gitta to his shack under the roof. The men do not suspect that the young woman is already an extremely successful singer.

In order to pay the bill for a taxi, Gitta sends the driver to the hotel where the musical ensemble is staying, to her dance partner János, who is supposed to pay the bill. Meanwhile, Peter asks his publisher for an advance payment for the newly composed song. However, he declined, pointing out that the printing of his irrelevant compositions had been paid for by his father. In the meantime, the Prímás has pulled out all the stops to find his star and even offered a large reward, but Gitta has disappeared. He can't count on his second role, Ilona, because she's so excited that she can't make a sound. Shortly before the upcoming premiere, Gitta returns to the Prímás because she wants to help her Peter.

The Prímás is so relieved his star has returned that he allows Gitta to sing Peter's song. When Peter sees his Gitta as the big star of the revue at the premiere, who performs his song with great success, he believes that she has played a joke on him. Despite all the misunderstandings, the young couple finally finds their way back together.

Cast

References

  1. ^ Bock, Hans-Michael; Bergfelder, Tim, eds. (2009). The Concise Cinegraph: Encyclopaedia of German Cinema. New York: Berghahn Books. p. 139. ISBN 1571816550. JSTOR j.ctt1x76dm6.

External links

This page was last edited on 3 January 2024, at 12:34
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