To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Gigglesnort Hotel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Gigglesnort Hotel
Gigglesnort hotel desk
Desk clerk Bill Jackson and Dirty Dragon at the front desk of the Gigglesnort Hotel.
GenreChildren's program
Created byBill Jackson
Country of originUnited States
Original languageEnglish
Release
Original networkWLS-TV
First shown in1975
Original release1978 (1978)

Gigglesnort Hotel is a syndicated children's television program which ran for 78 episodes between 1975 and 1978. It was hosted by Bill Jackson, previously the host of several Chicago-based children's programs including Clown Alley and The BJ and Dirty Dragon Show. The program was set, as the title implies, at an old hotel, where Jackson's role was a desk clerk.[1] The program featured many of the characters from the previous show, including Dirty Dragon, the Old Professor, Weird, Old Mother Plumtree, and several others who were created just for the program, such as the hotel's owner, Old Man Gigglesnort.[2][3][4][5]

The show was widely praised by critics, and it became one of the highest-rated children's shows in WLS-TV history.[1][6][7] It was syndicated in 1978, airing in several markets nationwide as well as Canada, Italy, and Saudi Arabia.[8]

Jackson made a final appearance for a presentation for the Museum of Broadcast Communications, "Saturday Morning with B.J. and Dirty Dragon: Bill Jackson, Live in Person—One Last Time", in December 2009, saying this would be his last time appearing as a performer.[9][10] In 1995, he donated all his original puppets to Chicago's Museum of Broadcast Communications.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b "Bill Jackson Interview". Toonarific. 1 April 2001. Retrieved 13 February 2011.
  2. ^ Caro, Mark (1 October 2009). "Catching up with local children's TV legend Bill Jackson". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 13 February 2011.
  3. ^ Okuda and Mulqueen 2004, p. 149.
  4. ^ a b Hollis 2001, p. 105.
  5. ^ Blecha, Karen Rugen (August 20, 1978). "Sunday Morning a World Apart From Saturday Kid Shows". TV Week-Chicago Tribune. p. 2. Retrieved April 24, 2015.
  6. ^ "Chicago Emmy Awards" (PDF). Chicago chapter-National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. 1977–1978. Retrieved 13 February 2011.(PDF)
  7. ^ "Chicago Emmy Awards" (PDF). Chicago chapter-National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. 1976–1977. Retrieved 13 February 2011.(PDF)
  8. ^ "Cartoon Town, BJ and Dirty Dragon". Chicago Television. Retrieved 14 February 2011.
  9. ^ "Last Chance To Gigglesnort". Illinois Entertainer. 30 October 2009. Retrieved 14 February 2011.
  10. ^ "B.J. and Dirty Dragon's Bill Jackson to Revisit the Golden Age of Chicago Children's Television with LIVE Performance". Museum of Broadcast Communications. 12 November 2009. Archived from the original on December 5, 2010. Retrieved 13 February 2011.

Bibliography

External links

This page was last edited on 25 January 2022, at 16:46
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.