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General Electric T64

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

T64
JMSDF US-1A T64-IHI-10E turboprop engine(cutaway model) left front view at MCAS Iwakuni May 5, 2019.jpg
Cutaway of a T64-IHI-10E (in turboprop configuration)
Type Turboshaft
National origin United States
Manufacturer GE Aviation
First run (T64-GE-2) March 1959
Major applications Lockheed AH-56 Cheyenne
Alenia G.222
de Havilland Canada DHC-5 Buffalo
Sikorsky CH-53 Sea Stallion
Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion

The General Electric T64 is a free-turbine turboshaft engine that was originally developed for use on helicopters, but which was later used on fixed-wing aircraft as well. General Electric introduced the engine in 1964. The original engine design included technical innovations such as corrosion resistant and high-temperature coatings.[1] The engine features a high overall pressure ratio, yielding a low specific fuel consumption for its time.[2] Although the compressor is all-axial, like the earlier General Electric T58, the power turbine shaft is coaxial with the HP shaft and delivers power to the front of the engine, not rearwards. Fourteen compressor stages are required to deliver the required overall pressure ratio. Compressor handling is facilitated by 4 rows of variable stators. Unlike the T58, the power turbine has 2 stages.

Later versions of the engine produce from 3,925 to 4,750 shp (2,927 to 3,542 kW).[3]

The engine was designed to accommodate different gearboxes or shaft drives, for helicopter or turboprop fixed-wing applications. The engine could be operated continuously at angles between 100 degrees upward and 45 degrees downward for STOL or helicopter applications.[4]

Variants

side view of a helicopter with the engine bay open, displaying engine internals
T64-GE-7 installed on Sikorsky CH-53G helicopter

Data from: Vectorsite;Sikorsky Giant Helicopters[5]

T64-GE-1
3,080 hp (2,300 kW)
T64-GE-2
Turbo-shaft: 2,810 hp (2,100 kW) at 5,200 rpm output[6]
T64-GE-3
T64-GE-4
Turbo-prop, reduction gearbox below centre-line, airscrew brake and bolt-on control unit: 2,850 hp (2,130 kW) at 1,160 propeller rpm.[6]
YT64-GE-6
2,850 hp (2,130 kW) used for Hughes XV-9 hot-cycle hot cycle rotor drive research helicopter.
T64-GE-6
Turbo-shaft: 2,850 hp (2,130 kW) at 13,600 engine rpm.[6]
T64-GE-7
3,925 hp (2,927 kW)
T64-GE-7A
3,936 hp (2,935 kW)
T64-GE-8
Turbo-prop, reduction gearbox above centerline, airscrew brake and bolt-on control unit: 2,850 hp (2,130 kW) at 1,160 propeller rpm.[6]
T64-GE-10
2,970 hp (2,210 kW)
T64-GE-16
3,485 hp (2,599 kW)
T64-GE-100
4,330 hp (3,230 kW)
T64-GE-412
3,695 hp (2,755 kW)
T64-GE-413
3,925 hp (2,927 kW)
T64-GE-413A
3,936 hp (2,935 kW)
T64-GE-415
4,380 hp (3,270 kW)
T64-GE-416
4,380 hp (3,270 kW) - three on Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion[7]
T64-GE-419
4,750 hp (3,540 kW) engine to power the Bell V-280 Valor demonstrator tiltrotor aircraft[8]
T64-GE-423
3,925 hp (2,927 kW)
T64-BS-12
T63-BS-16
T64-P4D
Turboprop 3,400 hp (2,500 kW)
CT64-820-1
2,850 hp (2,130 kW)
CT64-820-2
CT64-820-3
3,130 hp (2,330 kW)
CT64-820-4
3,133 hp (2,336 kW)
T64/P4D
3,400 hp (2,500 kW)[9]
Ishikawajima-Harima T64-IHI-10
For Kawasaki P-2J and Shin Meiwa PS-X

Applications

Specifications (T64-GE-100)

Data from Gas Turbine Engines[10]

General characteristics

  • Type: Turboshaft engine
  • Length: 79 in (2,007 mm)
  • Diameter: 20 in (508 mm)
  • Dry weight: 720 lb (327 kg)

Components

Performance

See also

Comparable engines

Related lists

Notes

  1. ^ GE T64 page, GlobalSecurity.org, accessed October 29, 2007.
  2. ^ Gunston, W.T. (January 13, 1961). "T64: Design philosophy behind GE's new shaft turbine". Flight. pp. 63–64. Archived from the original on January 11, 2019.
  3. ^ T64 turboshaft page, GE Aviation, accessed October 29, 2007.
  4. ^ "General Electric T-64". Newsreel. Flying. May 1962. p. 68.
  5. ^ "Sikorsky Giant Helicopters: S-64, S-65, & S-80". Vectorsite. 1 March 2008. Retrieved 5 January 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d Taylor, John W.R. FRHistS. ARAeS (1962). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1962-63. London: Sampson, Low, Marston & Co Ltd.
  7. ^ "About the GE T64" BGA-aeroweb, May 17, 2012. Accessed: April 10, 2014.
  8. ^ Tomkins, Richard (October 15, 2014). "GE Aviation supplying engines for V-280 demo aircraft". United Press International.
  9. ^ John W.R. Taylor, ed. (1988). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1988-89. London: Jane's Information Group. ISBN 0-7106-0867-5.
  10. ^ Gas Turbine Engines. Aviation Week & Space Technology Source Book 2009. p. 118.
  11. ^ Leyes, Richard A.; Fleming, William A. (1999). The history of North American small gas turbine aircraft engines. pp. 293–310. ISBN 9781563473326.

References

External links

This page was last edited on 11 January 2022, at 16:32
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