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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A ground garam masala
A ground garam masala

Garam masala (Hindi: गरम मसाला; Marathi: गरम मसाला; Punjabi: ਗਰਮ ਮਮਸਾਲਾ; Gujarati: ગરમ મસાલા; Urdu: گرم مصالحہ‎; Bengali: গরম মসলা) from garam ("hot") and masala (a mixture of spices) is a blend of ground spices, originating from the Indian subcontinent, common in cuisines from the Indian subcontinent[1] and Mauritius. It is used alone or with other seasonings. The word garam refers to "heating the body" in the Ayurvedic sense of the word, as these spices are believed to elevate body temperature in Ayurvedic medicine. There are other types of masala, like tikka masala and tandoori masala.

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Contents

Ingredients

Typical ingredients for a garam masala (clockwise from upper left): black peppercorns, mace, cinnamon, cloves, brown cardamom, nutmeg, and green cardamom
Typical ingredients for a garam masala (clockwise from upper left): black peppercorns, mace, cinnamon, cloves, brown cardamom, nutmeg, and green cardamom

The composition of garam masala differs regionally, with many recipes across the Indian subcontinent according to regional and personal taste,[1] and none is considered more authentic than others. The components of the mix are toasted, then ground together.

A typical Indian version of garam masala contains:

Some recipes[2] call for the spices to be blended with herbs, while others call for the spices to be ground with water, vinegar, or other liquids, to make a paste. In some recipes, ingredients including nuts, onions, or garlic may be added. Some recipes also call for small quantities of star anise, asafoetida, chili, stone flower (known as dagadphool), and kababchini (cubeb). The flavours may be carefully blended to achieve a balanced effect, or a single flavour may be emphasized. A masala may be toasted before use to release its flavours and aromas.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c Rama Rau, Santha (June 1969). The Cooking of India (Foods of the World). USA: Time Life Education. ISBN 978-0-8094-0069-0.
  2. ^ Bhide, Monica, "Garam Masala: A Taste Worth Acquiring". npr.org. April 27, 2011

External links

This page was last edited on 23 January 2019, at 02:59
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