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Fundraising for the 2012 United States presidential election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fundraising plays a central role in many presidential campaigns, and is a key factor in determining the viability of candidates. Money raised is applied in many ways, such as for the salaries of non-volunteers in the campaign, transportation, campaign materials, and media advertisements. Under United States law, candidates are required to file campaign finance details with the Federal Elections Commission (FEC) at the end of every calendar month or quarter. Summaries of these reports are made available to the public shortly thereafter, revealing the relative financial situations of all the campaigns.

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  • ✪ How Much Does It Cost To Run For President?
  • ✪ USF System President Judy Genshaft's Fall Address

Transcription

Here’s some good news for the Americans dreaming of being President. It turns out the job requirements are surprisingly simple. You just have to be a natural-born US citizen 35 years or older who’s lived in the US for the past 14 years But, of course, there’s another factor here – money, honey! So how much does it actually cost to run for President? Registering as a Presidential candidate isn’t actually that expensive. First, you need to fill out – surprise – a government form. It’s called the Statement of Candidacy, or FEC Form 2, and you’re required to submit this within 15 days of becoming a candidate. So when does an average Jane or Joe become a candidate? According to the Feds, you’re automatically a candidate once your team has either received 5,000 dollars in contributions, or racked up 5,000 in campaign expenses. In June of 2016, the FEC listed 1772 candidates. That’s right; you’re just 5,000 away from joining such influential Americans as Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Obi Wan Jedi Kenobi and Nicki Minaj. But remember, there’s a big difference between running for President and actually winning. To campaign successfully you’ll need much more than 5,000 bucks. Your next step will be getting on state ballots. Each state may have different rules outlining how you can do this. Unless you’re already established in the public eye, you’ll need petitions. For example, in 2012, Democratic candidates needed either 1% or 500 signatures from Democrats in each of California’s districts. There were over 50 districts! This means you’ll need a volunteer campaign, along with advertising and, probably, a paid staff. While it’s possible to be a write-in candidate, it’s not probable that you’d be able to garner any significant numbers that way. Caucus states like Iowa just require enough people to show up and cast a ballot for you. But there are hundreds of caucuses in Iowa alone. You’ll need a strategy to reach these voters, which, again, means you’ll need a staff. You’ll also need money for advertising, travel, and more. The cost of pizza for volunteers alone could run into the tens of thousands of dollars over time. By this point, the campaign has already become massively expensive. Luckily, you’ve got contributors. Virtually no viable candidate is going to be self-funded. Instead, the average would-be President receives contributions from individuals, parties, corporations, political action committees and so on. Uncle Sam has different limits on how much money these entities can contribute during the primary and general elections. While every campaign is different, there are some definite trends. For instance, each recent campaign seems to be more expensive than the last. According to the FEC, President Obama’s 2012 reelection campaign raised 683.5 million dollars. Contributions from the Democratic party and other outside groups raised the total to around 1.1 billion dollars. When we combine all of the parties, the 2012 election was estimated to cost 2.6 billion dollars. Pundits, fundraisers and other policy wonks are predicting the 2016 campaign may top these numbers, with the Clinton campaign alone rumored to possibly reach 1.5 to 2 billion dollars. These numbers have led speculators like the Economist to predict that the 2016 election may eventually ring in at an unprecedented 5 billion dollars. Does this mean you have to be a multi-millionaire to become Commander-in-Chief? No. But it does mean you’ll need millions of someone’s dollars to ensure your voice is heard amid the din of all the other candidates vying for the public’s attention. In 2004 George W. Bush spent 367 million for reelection, while the John Kerry campaign spent 328. In 2008 election, the first Obama campaign spent 730 million, with the McCain side spending 333. As we saw earlier, the 2012 Obama reelection pushed costs to 683 million, compared to Mitt Romney's campaign’s 433 million. Notice a pattern? In recent elections it seems the folks who spent the most ended up in the White House. If this trend continues, and you want to be president in 2016 or later, well… either start saving or start writing to your supporters. You’ll need all the help you can get. Which reminds me. Does anyone want to contribute to my campaign? Because I'm actually running for Presidentress of YouTube. And it just feels good to say it publicly. I don't know if that job actually exists, but gosh darnit I'm running. And while you're here, don't forget to subscribe so you don't miss a moment of BrainStuff. And my failed election attempt.

Contents

July 2012

Campaign Finance information for the month of July 2012 according to the Federal Elections Commission[1]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Barack Obama $49,167,908.64 $58,956,970.12 $87,747,677.61 $0

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Ron Paul $54,304.78 $396,049.79 $2,497,183.28 $0
Buddy Roemer $66,630.99 $26,495.19 $73,755.58 $0
Mitt Romney $40,329,413.16 $32,653,870.28 $30,181,372.86 $0
Rick Santorum $280,788.17 $288,231.81 $322,444.27 $0

Independent

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Gary Johnson $332,980.80 $323,934.69 $14,264.95 $0

2nd Quarter 2012

Campaign Finance information for the month of April 2012, May 2012, & June 2012 according to the Federal Elections Commission[2][3][4]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Barack Obama (inc.) $110,759,403.51 $117,318,858.33 $97,536,739.09 $2,388,103.70

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Mitt Romney $68,186,303.00 $55,740,221.16 $22,505,829.98 $0
Ron Paul $3,881,560.45 $2,823,406.08 $2,838,928.29 $0
Rick Santorum $1,857,907.68 $3,332,120.81 $329,887.91 $1,693,560.68
Newt Gingrich $1,466,007.37 $2,632,546.69 $60,463.80 $4,858,130.31
Gary Johnson $402,187.19 $406,937.51 $5,218.84 $431,722.03
Rick Perry $28,252.73 $85,853.96 $417,206.91 $14,463.66
Buddy Roemer $169,700.35 $177,744.14 $9,969.16 $152,373.85
Key: Withdrew prior to end of quarter

1st Quarter 2012

Campaign Finance information for the month of January 2012, February 2012, & March 2012 according to the Federal Elections Commission[5][6][7]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Barack Obama (inc.) $68,258,209.10 $45,922,027.78 $104,096,193.91 $305,167.84

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Money Spent Cash On Hand Total Debt
Mitt Romney $31,558,506.39 $41,414,884.61 $10,059,748.14 $0
Rick Santorum $18,559,238.27 $17,034,071.84 $1,804,101.04 $1,989,928.86
Ron Paul $10,384,100.84 $10,999,944.14 $1,780,773.92 $0
Newt Gingrich $9,911,148.83 $10,792,976.94 $1,227,003.12 $4,300,052.65
Jon Huntsman $450,776.06 $6,368,330.96 $5,176,722.70 $93,745.00
Rick Perry $403,001.50 $3,690,078.90 $474,808.14 $14,463.66
Buddy Roemer $362,668.56 $174,582.67 $197,562.20 $4,900.00
Gary Johnson $169,700.35 $177,744.14 $9,969.16 $152,373.85
Michele Bachmann $167,727.40 $360,835.53 $165,616.53 $1,049,567.39
Tim Pawlenty $56,513.42 $96,966.51 $5,814.79 $44,670.84
Key: Withdrew prior to end of quarter

4th Quarter 2011

Campaign Finance information through December 31, 2011, according to the Federal Elections Commission as of January 31, 2012.[8]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Barack Obama (inc.) $39,932,062.33 $0 $19,563,336.72 $81,761,011.59 $7,500,000.00 $3,035,737.49

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Mitt Romney $24,278,503.06 $0 $19,019,342.53 $19,916,126.36 $0 $0
Ron Paul $13,322,158.03 $0 $15,085,426.39 $1,904,914.80 $0 $0
Herman Cain $11,480,745.35 $149,800.00 $11,828,193.55 $986,430.36 $0 $580,200.00
Newt Gingrich $9,822,375.66 $0 $8,066,961.14 $2,108,831.23 $0 $1,199,360.60
Rick Perry $2,909,565.49 $0 $14,226,095.17 $3,761,885.54 $0 $93,745.00
Michele Bachmann $1,712,152.46 $0 $2,692,611.90 $358,724.66 $0 $1,055,924.18
Jon Huntsman $1,404,236.12 $300,000.00 $1,620,885.17 $110,965.45 $0 $3,775,252.61
Rick Santorum $920,427.57 $0 $831,049.90 $278,934.61 $0 $204,836.34
Tim Pawlenty $400,013.24 $0 $373,918.16 $46,267.88 $0 $102,911.47
Gary Johnson $161,694.38 $0 $154,563.76 $18,012.95 $0 $203,761.01
Buddy Roemer $111,851.26 $4,900.00 $148,486.02 $9,476.31 $0 $4,900.00
Fred Karger $82,970.49 $0 $80,200.16 $16,041.06 $0 $0
Thaddeus McCotter $1,171.92 $0 $7,318.47 $927.38 $0 $105,636.24
Key: Withdrew prior to end of quarter

3rd Quarter 2011

Campaign Finance information through September 30, 2011, according to the Federal Elections Commission as of October 15, 2011.[9]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Barack Obama (inc.) $42,090,011.38 $0 $17,790,313.67 $61,403,710.55 $9,000,000.00 $1,709,300.30

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Rick Perry $17,200,232.07 $0 $2,121,816.85 $15,078,415.22 $0 $339,119.73
Mitt Romney $14,222,570.66 $0 $12,281,100.24 $14,656,965.83 $0 $0
Ron Paul $8,268,499.92 $0 $7,559,908.76 $3,674,768.16 $500,000.00 $0
Jon Huntsman $4,514,188.95 $2,249,481.05 $4,186,574.45 $327,614.50 $0 $3,145,593.75
Michele Bachmann $3,907,748.06 $0 $5,947,630.95 $1,339,184.10 $0 $549,604.07
Herman Cain $2,813,341.52 $175,000.00 $1,967,152.00 $1,333,778.56 $0 $675,000.00
Tim Pawlenty $994,670.77 $0 $2,975,588.07 $20,172.80 $0 $453,841.50
Newt Gingrich $807,962.45 $0 $776,767.90 $353,416.71 $0 $1,192,865.82
Rick Santorum $704,199.37 $0 $743,757.29 $189,556.94 $0 $71,866.19
Thaddeus McCotter $512,644.22 $0 $511,135.38 $1,508.84 $450,000.00 $105,367.24
Gary Johnson $236,193.77 $0 $231,317.99 $10,882.33 $0 $240,066.88
Buddy Roemer $137,521.03 $10,000.00 $110,468.41 $46,111.07 $0 $20,000.00
Fred Karger $89,684.94 $0 $79,407.09 $12,581.62 $0 $0
Key: Withdrew prior to end of quarter

2nd Quarter 2011

Campaign Finance information through June 30, 2011, according to the Federal Elections Commission as of July 15, 2011.[10]

Democrats

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Barack Obama (inc.) $46,323,209.30 $0 $11,095,657.39 $37,110,346.11 $12,750,000.00 $412,878.16

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Mitt Romney $18,383,256.66 $0 $5,668,384.74 $12,715,495.41 $0 $0
Ron Paul $4,518,947.59 $0 $1,552,770.59 $2,966,177.00 $500.00 $0
Tim Pawlenty $4,335,694.99 $0 $2,451,251.40 $2,001,090.10 $0 $1,915.06
Michele Bachmann $3,639,723.42 $0 $260,656.43 $3,379,066.99 $2,000,000.00 $364,119.67
Herman Cain $2,580,725.90 $500,000.00 $2,098,830.97 $481,894.93 $0 $500,000.00
Newt Gingrich $2,102,916.13 $0 $1,780,693.97 $322,222.16 $0 $1,030,627.82
Rick Santorum $582,347.67 $0 $353,232.81 $229,114.86 $0 $0
Gary Johnson $180,236.80 $0 $174,230.25 $6,006.55 $0 $227,360.33
Fred Karger $86,740.15 $0 $88,608.33 $2,303.77 $0 $0
Buddy Roemer $40,670.00 $10,000.00 $74,450.77 $19,058.45 $0 $0

1st Quarter 2011

Campaign Finance information through March 30, 2011, according to the Federal Elections Commission as of April 15, 2011.[11]

Republicans

Candidate Money Raised Loans Received Money Spent Cash On Hand Money Transfers
(from other accounts)
Total Debt
Fred Karger $479,871.13 $200,000 $175,699.18 $4,171.95 $0 $2,342,765.97
Tim Pawlenty $160,065.91 $0 $43,419.40 $116,646.51 $0 $0
Buddy Roemer $54,990.00 $0 $2,150.78 $52,839.22 $0 $0

References

  1. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 August Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  2. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 May Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  3. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 June Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  4. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 July Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  5. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 February Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  6. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 March Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  7. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2012 April Monthly". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-08-08. Retrieved 2012-08-08.
  8. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2011 Year-End". Federal Elections Commission. 2012-02-01. Retrieved 2012-02-01.
  9. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2011 October Quarterly". Federal Elections Commission. 2011-10-15. Retrieved 2011-10-15.
  10. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2011 July Quarterly". Federal Elections Commission. 2011-06-15. Retrieved 2011-06-15.
  11. ^ "Selected Presidential Reports For The 2011 April Quarterly". Federal Elections Commission. 2011-04-15. Retrieved 2011-06-15.

External links

This page was last edited on 14 December 2018, at 17:50
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