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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Frozen II
Frozen II theatrical release poster showing Elsa with Anna and Olaf to her right and Kristoff and Sven to her left
Theatrical release poster
Directed by
Screenplay byJennifer Lee
Produced byPeter Del Vecho
Starring
Cinematography
  • Tracy Scott Beattie (layout)[1]
  • Mohit Kallianpur (lighting)[1]
Edited byJeff Draheim
Music by
Production
companies
Distributed byWalt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release date
  • November 7, 2019 (2019-11-07) (Dolby Theatre)
  • November 22, 2019 (2019-11-22) (United States)
Running time
103 minutes[2]
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
Budget$150 million[3]
Box office$1.450 billion[4]

Frozen II[a] is a 2019 American computer-animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios, the 58th entry in the Disney Animation canon, and the sequel to Frozen (2013). It is directed by Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee, written by Lee, produced by Peter Del Vecho, and stars Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Josh Gad, and Jonathan Groff. Set three years after the first film, Frozen II follows sisters Anna and Elsa, alongside an iceman, his reindeer, and a snowman as they travel to the mythical Enchanted Forest to unravel the origin of Elsa's magical power. The film deals with a wide variety of themes, particularly anti-imperialism, anti-colonialism, and female empowerment.

Production for Frozen II was approved in March 2015 after an internal debate at Disney over if it would be a disappointment to audiences compared to the original. With a darker tone compared to the first film, it uses more complex visual computer effects that required additional assistance from other animation departments due to its complication. Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez wrote the songs, with Christophe Beck as composer. It was translated to 46 languages, and was accompanied by a development documentary series, Into the Unknown: Making Frozen II.

Frozen II premiered in Los Angeles on November 7, 2019, and was released in the United States on November 22. The film received generally positive reviews from critics with praise for its characters and humor, though its story was considered inferior to its predecessor. The film's music received a polarized response. It earned $1.450 billion worldwide, and became the third highest-grossing film of 2019, the 10th highest-grossing film of all time, and the second highest-grossing animated film of all time during its theatrical run, where the film had the highest all-time worldwide opening for an animated film. Frozen II also received numerous accolades, including two Annie Awards, and was nominated for a BAFTA, two Golden Globes, and two Grammys. At the 92nd Academy Awards, the film was nominated for Best Original Song for "Into the Unknown".

Plot

King Agnarr of Arendelle tells a story to his two young daughters, Elsa and Anna, about their grandfather, King Runeard, establishing a treaty with a neighboring tribe of Northuldra by building a dam in their homeland, the Enchanted Forest. However, a fight occurs, resulting in Runeard's death and enraging the forest's classical elemental spirits of Earth, Fire, Water, and Air. The spirits disappear and a wall of mist traps everyone in the Enchanted Forest. Agnarr barely escapes with the help of an unknown savior.

Three years after her coronation,[b] Elsa celebrates autumn in the kingdom with Anna, Olaf the snowman, Kristoff the iceman, and Kristoff's reindeer Sven. One night, Elsa hears a mysterious voice calling out to her. She follows it and unintentionally awakens the elemental spirits, which forces everyone in the kingdom to evacuate. The Rock Troll colony arrives, and Grand Pabbie informs them that Elsa and the others must set things right by discovering the truth about the past. Elsa, Anna, Olaf, Kristoff, and Sven follow the mysterious voice and travel to the Enchanted Forest. After the mist parts at Elsa's touch, the Air spirit appears in the form of a tornado and sweeps everyone in its vortex before Elsa stops by forming ice sculptures. The sisters discover the sculptures are images from their father's past. They encounter the Northuldra and a troop of Arendellian soldiers who are still in conflict with one another. When the Fire spirit appears, Elsa discovers the spirit to be an agitated magical salamander and calms it down. Elsa and Anna arrange a truce between the soldiers and the Northuldra after discovering that their mother, Queen Iduna, was a Northuldran who had saved Agnarr, an Arendellian. They later learn the existence of a fifth spirit who will unite the people with the magic of nature.

Elsa, Anna, and Olaf continue to head north, leaving Kristoff and Sven behind. They find their parents' wrecked ship and a map with a route to Ahtohallan, a mythical river said to contain all explanations of the past. Elsa sends Anna and Olaf away to safety and continues alone. She encounters and tames the Nøkk, the Water spirit who guards the sea to Ahtohallan. Elsa discovers that the voice calling to her is the memory of young Iduna's call, her powers are a gift from nature because of Iduna's selfless act of saving Agnarr, and Elsa herself is the fifth spirit. Elsa learns that the dam was built as a ruse to reduce the Northuldrans' resources because of Runeard's contempt for the tribe's connection with magic, and his intention to wipe them out and incorporate the region into the kingdom. She also learns that Runeard started the conflict by killing the unarmed Northuldran leader in cold blood. Elsa sends this information to Anna before she becomes frozen (causing Olaf to fade away) when she ventures into the most dangerous part of Ahtohallan.

Anna concludes that the dam must be destroyed for peace to be restored. She finds and awakens the gigantic Earth spirits, Jötunn, and lures them towards the dam. They hurl boulders that destroy the dam, sending a flood down the fjord towards the kingdom. Elsa thaws out and returns to Arendelle, diverting the flood and saving the kingdom. As the mist disappears, Elsa reunites with Anna and revives Olaf, and Anna accepts Kristoff's marriage proposal. Elsa explains that she and Anna are the bridge between the people and the magical spirits. Afterward, Anna becomes the new Queen of Arendelle while Elsa becomes the protector of the Enchanted Forest who regularly visits Arendelle as peace has been restored.

In a post-credits scene, Olaf visits Elsa's ice palace and recounts the events he experienced Marshmallow, a giant snow monster created by Elsa as palace guard,[b] and Snowgies, miniature snowmen that were inadvertently generated by Elsa on Anna's nineteenth birthday.[c]

Cast

Additionally, Alan Tudyk provided the voices of a guard, a Northuldran leader, and an Arendellian soldier.[6] Paul Briggs also reprised his role in the film's post-credits scene as Marshmallow, a giant snow monster created by Elsa.[6]

Production

Pre-development

Peter Del Vecho (left), Jennifer Lee (centre), and Chris Buck (right) smiling at the premiere of Frozen in El Capitan Theatre on November 19, 2013.
From left to right: Producer Peter Del Vecho, director and writer Jennifer Lee, and director Chris Buck.

In March 2014, upon being asked about Frozen's future, producer Peter Del Vecho said that Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, and he collaborate well together, and that he figured that they would be involved on another project related to Frozen, though he had no idea what it might be.[9] That April, Walt Disney Studios chairman Alan F. Horn said that a sequel was not considered because the studio prioritized the development of a Broadway musical of the same name.[10][11] In May, during an interview with David Faber on CNBC, Disney CEO Bob Iger revealed that the company would not commission a sequel because it would risk creating something less fascinating than the first film. Iger also wished that the Frozen franchise "is something that is kind of forever for the company", similar to The Lion King.[12]

In June 2014, Lee confirmed that Walt Disney Studios chief creative officer John Lasseter had expressly granted her and Buck the freedom to explore whatever they were interested about.[13][14] While working on the short film Frozen Fever, they realized how much they missed the characters.[14] Meanwhile, Del Vecho had been accepting speech engagements around the world, where fans asked him questions regarding Frozen's future.[14] In November 2014, Lee, Buck, and Del Vecho discussed the possibility of a sequel.[14] Buck later explained: "The one thing that we did right away was to figure out what would be satisfying for Anna and Elsa at the end of the movie."[15] They decided on the ending that they spent the next five years trying to earn: Anna would become the queen of Arendelle and Elsa would be "free".[14]

Development

At the Walt Disney Animation Studio, as with Pixar, when we do a sequel, it is because the filmmakers who created the original have created an idea that is so good that it's worthy of these characters. We enjoyed making Frozen Fever so much and being back in that world with those characters, and we love the characters in this world so much of Arendelle, that Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck have come up with a great idea for a sequel and you will be hearing a lot.

John Lasseter announcing Frozen II[16]

On March 12, 2015, at Disney's annual meeting of shareholders in San Francisco, Iger, Lasseter, and actor Josh Gad officially announced that a full-length sequel, Frozen II, was in development at Disney, with Buck and Lee returning as directors and Del Vecho as producer.[16][17]

To do background research, the production team traveled to Norway, Finland, and Iceland.[18][19] From the Scandinavia research trip, the production team concluded that Elsa is a "mythic hero" who possesses magical ice powers, while Anna is a "fairytale hero" who lives in a world with magic but does not have magical powers herself.[20] They also inferred that the first film was succeeded by how it combined these two sets of elements.[20] In August 2018, Allison Schroeder was hired to assist Lee with the script after Lee succeeded Lasseter as Disney Animation's chief creative officer;[21] Lee was credited as screenwriter, while Schroeder was attributed with additional screenplay material.[22]

Voice recording began in September 2017,[23][24] though Menzel started a couple weeks later due to her concert tour.[25] That same month, Gad announced his role in the sequel with Buck, Lee, Del Vecho, and Lasseter.[26][27] In July 2018, Variety reported that Evan Rachel Wood and Sterling K. Brown had entered talks to join the cast.[28] Their roles was then undisclosed, but was later revealed to be Iduna, mother of Elsa and Anna,[29] and Lieutenant Destin Mattias.[30] Wood was chosen for her role because her voice was similar to Menzel and Bell's.[29] The role of Agnarr, father of Elsa and Anna, was switched from Maurice LaMarche to Alfred Molina.[8] The Voice's 4-note call is derived from the Latin sequence Dies irae, but is delivered in a manner inspired by the Scandinavian music form kulning.[31]

The film's first completed scenes were shown at the Annecy International Animated Film Festival in June 2019, where Becky Bresee and head of effects animation Marlon West said the film was "still in production, with seven weeks of animation to be completed and 10 weeks of special effects".[32][33] Throughout the film's production, filmmakers collaborated with Sámi experts on the depiction of the fictional Northuldra tribe, which results to the establishment of an advisory group named Verdett. This collaboration was the result of an agreement between The Walt Disney Company, the transnational Saami Council, and the Sámi parliaments of Finland, Norway, and Sweden.[34] While some fans campaigned for Elsa to receive a female love interest in the film, Anderson-Lopez confirmed that Elsa would have no love interest in the movie.[35] Lee later explained to The New York Times reporter Maureen Dowd that it seemed Elsa was not ready for a relationship, based on results from a Myers-Briggs test.[36] During a press conference for the film, Lee had determined that the film would not acquire elements from the television series Once Upon a Time's unofficial expanded Frozen storyline.[37]

“No, that’s not canon. We didn’t see it. So I kinda made a point of certain things not to see so it wouldn’t affect us that way. Frozen I and Frozen II to me are one complete story and that’s really where we stay. So glad they had fun with that. I think they had a lot of fun with the characters.”

— Director and writer Jennifer Lee denying the canonicity of Once Upon a Time's Frozen materials.[37]

Megan Harding, who had previously directed a 2014 making-of ABC television special about Frozen, reached out to Disney Animation about whether she could document the production of Frozen II; the company agreed.[38][39] Harding traveled regularly from her base in New York City to Burbank, California, and shot 1,300 hours of footage over 115 days from December 2018 to the November 2019 world premiere.[40] According to Harding, Disney Animation provided full cooperation knowing she intended to take a "fearless" and "honest look" at its filmmaking process; Her crew was asked to leave the room only once,[38] when the production team wanted to decide the mysterious voice's identity.[41]

Animation

Computer and rendering effects applied to Elsa in five steps.
Effects visualization on the character Elsa, Elsa's design in the sequel was subjected to an en emulate limitation. Her movement concepts were modeled after both the first film and the cultural modern dance.

The film was produced by a team of approximately 800 people, 80 of whom were animators.[42] Tony Smeed and Bresee served as the film's heads of animation.[20] Hyun-Min Lee served as animation supervisor for Anna, while Wayne Unten reprised his role from the first film as animation supervisor for Elsa.[43] Before animation began, Unten showed various scenes of superheroes like Frozone to the animators working on Elsa as examples of what not to emulate.[43] Elsa's movements in the sequel were modeled after her graceful movements in the first film and the cultural modern dance, particularly Martha Graham's work.[43]

The mythical water spirits Nøkk, as illustrated by Norwegian artist Theodor Kittelsen.
The Germanic water spirits Nøkk, as painted by uninvolved mythology artist Theodor Kittelsen.[44] Nøkk's adaption was so difficult it required additional assistance from other animation groups and individuals.

According to co-production designer Lisa Keene, the animators did "a lot of artwork" to define a design based on the Germanic water spirits, Nøkk. The visual mythical adoption required additional collaborations from several other animation departments, artists, and technicians due to its difficulty; as estimated by visual supervisor Steve Golberg, the process took at least 8 months to complete.[22] The animation team aimed to give the Nøkk a more stable appearance than the ocean depicted in Moana.[22] The Nøkk's transformative adoption embodies a liquid-like appearance that the effects team rendered with Erin Ramos's supervision. The animators were supplied with tools to construct its comet-like invisible rig and old key-framing technology for its strong and stormy physical characteristics.[22] To create the wind spirit Gale, a new tool called Swoop was invented, which required four (sometimes five) different departments to cooperate on the character's animation, with animators working with real-time feedback.[45][46] The water simulation was made to be more realistic than in Moana, but some of the elements in the movie were thought to be so realistic that they felt inconsistent next to the characters, and so they had to be made more stylistic.[47] Creating the flurry effect was so difficult for the animators that the directors decided Elsa would have perfected a permafrost coating for Olaf by the second film.[48] According to Smeed, the Earth Giants "had a long rigging process" for the characters to move without "[seeing] solid rock penetrating solid rock", while Marlon West, the film's head of effects animation, said that the film's effects team had the objective of generating "rocks that would fall out of the joints as they moved", though they had to be careful to avoid making the rocks distracting.[22]

Frozen II underwent significant revisions after its first test screening in San Diego.[41] Disney Animation discovered that adults liked the film, but children found it hard to follow.[41] The production team realized they needed to clarify the identity of The Voice as well as the point of Elsa's transformation, add more comedy, and add more shots of Bruni, the fire salamander.[41] There was a scene full of expository dialogue in which the lead characters explained to the people trapped in the Enchanted Forest why they had come there, which was replaced with Olaf's humorous recap of the first film.[41] Due to these extensive changes, the animators needed to create 61 new shots and redo another 35, while an undisclosed number of shots were cut from the finished film.[41] For example, approximately a dozen animators and artists had labored for two months on a far more elaborate resurrection scene for Olaf before it was cut.[41]

The last major animation sequence completed before the production team locked the picture was "Show Yourself", the musical number in which Elsa enters Ahtohallan and learns the secrets she had been seeking. Del Vecho said the sequence "required all of the resources at the studio" to get the film done on time.[14] Robert Lopez said that the first draft of "Show Yourself" was very different from the final version.[49] Harding's documentary captured the difficult process of Del Vecho and Lopez determining The Voice's identity.[41] Once the production team settled on Queen Iduna, lyrics of "Show Yourself" began to pieced together, but the artists, designers, and animators needed to quickly figure out how to stage the dramatic culmination of Elsa's journey towards becoming the Snow Queen.[41]

Music

From left to right: Songwriters Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, and composer Christophe Beck.

Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez returned from the first film to write songs for the sequel, with Christophe Beck back as composer.[50] The full album was released on November 15, 2018,[51] following disseminate publication of Panic! at the Disco's edition of the single "Into the Unknown".[52]

Beck noted that the score spiritually conveys Elsa's and Anna's emotional growth, he described the impacts as "matured and introduces more sophisticated musical concepts and thematic elements". He also wanted it to reflect the film's complex and intense imagery.[53] Anderson-Lopez described the album's theme simply as "meta-story", mainly because of the unclarity ahead of how each of the songs would interact in the final version. Harding also dispatched a camera crew to the Lopezes' studio in Brooklyn to document their songwriting and composing process,[38] but they found that having camera operators watch them disrupted their creativity, and they completed most of the work off-camera.[40]

Marketing

Disney released the first teaser trailer for the film on February 13, 2019.[54] It was viewed 116.4 million times in the first 24 hours, and became the second most-viewed animated film trailer in that time period, surpassing Incredibles 2 (113.6 million views).[55] Upon the reveal of the teaser poster, American astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson raised an issue that "water crystals have hexagonal 'six-fold' symmetry" shown correctly in the previous film, but that the poster showed a snowflake with four instead.[56] In a reply, Lee said that it was not really a snowflake; the film explained that the four edges represented the four elemental spirits, while its center represented Elsa, the fifth spirit.[57][58]

Disney partnered with 140 brands worldwide to promote Frozen 2, the highest number ever for any Disney animated film.[59] In the U.S. market, Disney heavily marketed the film through a variety of internal and external partners such as Enterprise Rent-A-Car, McDonald's, and Lego.[59] To support the film's marketing campaign, the lead cast members made numerous public and televised appearances. Notable highlights includes “Friendsgiving”: stunt night at ABC; "The Masked Singer": intro and special looks at Fox, and the "Impact of Women Feature" at Nat Geo Wild.[60] In November 2019, the lead cast members' schedules were so full with appearances that in Bell's words, "time [was] not there".[61]

Release

Theatrical and localisation

Frozen II had its world premiere held at Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles on November 7 2019, among the audience were attended by both of its cast and crew.[62][63] It was originally scheduled to be released on November 27,[64] but was push reportedly forwarded five days earlier to November 22, 2019.[65] On January 17, 2020, a sing-along version was released.[66] It was localized through Disney Character Voices International into 46 languages by its original theater release,[67] while Frozen was translated to 41 languages.[68] After the success of the first film's localized versions led to the release of a complete set album featuring all the official versions of "Let It Go",[69] a special Northern Sami dubbing was released for Frozen II titled Jikŋon 2 in honor of their contributions.[70]

Home media

Frozen II was released by Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment on Digital HD and 4K on February 11, 2020, followed by an Ultra HD Blu-ray, Blu-ray, and DVD release on February 25.[71] The Blu-ray bonus features include a sing-along audio recording of the film; an Easter-based short hosted by Olaf, and a presentation of the spiritual inspirational mythologies of Scandinavian and Nordic which the enchanted forest is based upon. In addition, it also incorporated a musical scores behind-the-scenes review, kid-friendly activities and contests,[72] musical clips, 29 international translated counterparts of the song "Into the Unknown", and deleted music and scenes.[73]

The film was initially scheduled to be released on Disney+ on June 26, 2020, but it was moved forward three months earlier to March 15, 2020, in the United States, and March 17, 2020, in Canada, the Netherlands, Australia, and New Zealand due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[74][75]

Documentary series

In April 2019, Disney announced a companion documentary series about the film's development titled Into the Unknown: Making Frozen II, which was released on the streaming service Disney+ in June 2020.[76] It was directed by Megan Harding, who began documenting the filmmaking process in December 2018 while working with Lincoln Square Productions. Regrading its over-length, Harding edited out the 1,300 hours of footage[77] down to six episodes that were approximately 35 to 45 minutes long.[40] The documentary features the song "See the Sky", which was cut from the final film but not released in the soundtrack.[40] Harding's favorite scene which was cut from the series was production designer Michael Giaimo discussing what he viewed as the crew's "passion, dedication, and specific OCD-like tendencies" while trimming his hedges to resemble the shape of trees in Frozen.[78]

Reception

Box office

Frozen II grossed $1.450 billion worldwide: $477.4 million in the United States and Canada, and $972.7 million in other territories,[4] making it the third highest-grossing film of 2019,[79] the 10th highest-grossing film of all time,[80] and the second highest-grossing animated film of all time.[81] Deadline Hollywood calculated the net profit of the film to be $599 million, accounting for production budgets, marketing, talent participations, and other costs, with box office grosses, and ancillary revenues from home media, placing it second on their list of 2019's "Most Valuable Blockbusters".[3] According to Disney (who did not consіder the 2019 The Lion King remake to be an anіmated fіlm but rather a live-action reboot), Frozen II is the hіghest-grossing anіmated fіlm, surpassing the first Frozen.[82]

Frozen II was released alongside A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood and 21 Bridges on November 22, 2019 in 4,440 theaters.[83] 2,500 of them are released in 3D, 400 and IMAX, with 800 in premium large format, and 235 in D-Box/4D,[84] it made $41.8 million on its first day,[85] including $8.5 million from Thursday night previews.[83] It went on to debut with $130 million, the highest opening for an animated film in the month.[86] Its second weekend saw the box office drop by 34% to $85.6 million (with a record of $125 million over the five-day Thanksgiving weekend),[87] and Frozen II grossed another $34.7 million the following weekend.[88] Frozen II completed its theatrical run in the United States and Canada on March 19, 2020, as the film industry was significantly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.[89][90]

Worldwide, Frozen II made $228.2 million in its opening weekend in 37 markets, for a global debut total of $358.5 million, the highest for an animated title, surpassing the 2019 The Lion King remake.[91] It had the best opening of all-time for an animated picture in the United Kingdom ($17.8 million) and France ($13.4 million), the biggest start for a Pixar or Disney Animation title in China ($53 million), Japan ($18.2 million), Germany ($14.9 million), and Spain ($5.8 million) and the third-biggest industry opening of any film in South Korea ($31.5 million).[91][92] It took $11.4 million in the second week in the United Kingdom, bringing its total gross there to $35.3 million.[93] As of July 2021, the film's top international markets were China ($125.3 million), Japan ($122.3 million), South Korea ($96.3 million), United Kingdom ($69.8 million), Germany ($60.6 million), and France ($54 million).[94]

Themes

Priya Satia, professor at Stanford University, wrote about Frozen II's thematic critique against imperialism and colonialism affairs in The Washington Post: "Frozen II is more radical and politically imaginative than most popular history books about empire, which continue to justify colonialism as the fault of disorderly indigenous people."[95] The film is intended as a preparation guide inspiring children of young age in growing up as adults; unity, courage, hopes, and truth acceptance have also been identified as major themes.[96][97] Rather than focusing on male protagonists like most animated films, the film stars heroines who commit to save their kingdom.[98][99] Repeatedly like the first film, Elsa attempted to have Anna stayed away because she's concerned with her sister's safety; the thematic selfless love was observed by Barbara VanDenburgh from The Arizona Republic as "fraught sibling dynamics."[100] Chicago Sun-Times's Richard Roeper also referenced to the film's "sister-power bonding moments," and that the story delivers thematic lessons about "historically natural enemies learning to love one another."[101] In addition, a package guide published by Into Film titled Frozen II Film Guide emphasizes on the thematic highlights to friendships, family-loves, and its impacts to the surrounding community.[102]

Critical response

The review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes reports that 78% of 331 reviews given to Frozen II were positive; the average rating was 6.70/10. Its critical consensus reads: "Frozen II can't quite recapture the showstopping feel of its predecessor, but it remains a dazzling adventure into the unknown."[103] Metacritic assigned the film a weighted average of 64 out of 100 based on 47 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[104] Audience polled by CinemaScore gave the average grade of "A–" (lower than the previous film's A+) on an A+ to F scale, while PostTrak reported a 4.5 out of 5-star rating from audiences on the film's opening day.[83][84]

Several critics praise upon the film's retainment of the humor, characters, and music; which they reacted as "pleasantly melodious", "dazzling", and "delightful."[105] Nell Minow of RogerEbert.com, noted positively that it plays strongly on elements of humor, miserableness, romance, and the particular darker tone. The same aspects for praise was also cited by The New York Times critic Manohla Dargis, who called it "nonthreatening, and emancipatory".[106][107] Reviews was very positive in media including Empire and Rolling Stone, often singles out the humor, characters and music for further praise, with the admiration described as "dazzling" and "delightful".[108][109] The same elements was also mentioned positively in The Hollywood Reporter by journalist Todd McCarthy, who additionally added that the voyage was "discovery" with "female empowerment galore." Similarly, Simran Hans of The Guardian underlined that she also particularly favorited the quest undertaken by the two sisters to heal their past because it directly resembles the real-world climate change of how humans was trying to resolve the climatical issue.[110][111]

Other writers considered the music and screenplay disappointing and tepid.[112] John Anderson for The Wall Street Journal cited his disappointment in the film's lack of actual villains,[113] whereas Observer critic Oliver Jones felt that that the script wasn't "truly unknown" or surprising as it had been thematically intended.[114] Mass-media newspapers including Los Angeles Times and The Washington Post panned the film's over-complicated and misplaced story and its distinctive gloomy theme, calling it an disappointment. These criticisms was collectively summarized by Richard Lawson in Vanity Fair as "rushed" and "half-baked."[2][115][116] Nicholas Barber of BBC and David Jenkins from Little White Lies emphasized on the messy screenplay, which they considered it over-complicated and confusing.[117][118] The script was also highlighted as underscores by magazine medias such as Scott Mendelson (Forbes) and Alison Willmore (Vulture). While Mendelson deemed the songs as "mediocre", Willmore felt that it was a more of a fancy product than a film.[119][120]

Accolades

Award Date of ceremony Category Recipients Result Ref(s)
Academy Awards February 9, 2020 Best Original Song Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for "Into the Unknown" Nominated [121]
Art Directors Guild Awards February 1, 2020 Excellence in Production Design for an Animated Film Michael Giaimo Nominated [122]
Alliance of Women Film Journalists Awards January 10, 2020 Best Animated Feature Frozen II Nominated [123]
Best Animated Female Kristen Bell Nominated
Idina Menzel Nominated
American Cinema Editors January 17, 2020 Best Edited Animated Feature Film Jeff Draheim Nominated [124]
[125]
Annie Awards January 25, 2020 Best Animated Feature Peter Del Vecho Nominated [126]
Outstanding Achievement for Animated Effects in an Animated Production Benjamin Fiske, Alex Moaveni, Jesse Erickson, Dimitre Berberov, and Kee Nam Suong Won
Outstanding Achievement for Character Animation in an Animated Feature Production Andrew Ford Nominated
Outstanding Achievement for Character Design in an Animated Feature Production Bill Schwab Nominated
Outstanding Achievement for Directing in an Animated Feature Production Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck Nominated
Outstanding Achievement for Music in an Animated Feature Production Christophe Beck (score), Frode Fjellheim, Kristen Anderson-Lopez, and Robert Lopez (songs) Nominated
Outstanding Achievement for Voice Acting in an Animated Feature Production Josh Gad Won
Outstanding Achievement for Writing in an Animated Feature Production Jennifer Lee Nominated
Billboard Music Awards October 14, 2020 Top Soundtrack Frozen II Won [127]
British Academy Film Awards February 2, 2020 Best Animated Film Chris Buck, Jennifer Lee, and Peter Del Vecho Nominated [128]
Casting Society of America January 30, 2020 Animation Jamie Sparer Roberts and Sarah Raoufpur (Associate) Nominated [129]
Critics' Choice Movie Awards January 12, 2020 Best Animated Feature Frozen II Nominated [130]
[131]
Best Song Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for "Into the Unknown" Nominated
Golden Globe Awards January 5, 2020 Best Animated Feature Film Frozen II Nominated [132]
[133]
Best Original Song – Motion Picture Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for "Into the Unknown" Nominated
Grammy Awards March 14, 2021 Best Compilation Soundtrack for Visual Media Frozen II – Various Artists Nominated [134]
Best Song Written for Visual Media Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for "Into the Unknown" Nominated
NAACP Image Awards February 22, 2020 Outstanding Character Voice-Over Performance Sterling K. Brown Nominated [135]
Producers Guild of America Awards January 18, 2020 Outstanding Producer of Animated Theatrical Motion Pictures Frozen II Nominated [136]
The ReFrame Stamp February 26, 2020 2019 Top 100-Grossing Narrative Feature Recipients Frozen II Won [137]
Satellite Awards December 19, 2019 Best Original Song Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez for "Into the Unknown" Nominated [138]
Saturn Awards 2021 Best Animated Film Frozen II Pending [139]
Visual Effects Society Awards January 29, 2020 Outstanding Visual Effects in an Animated Feature Steve Goldberg, Peter Del Vecho, Mark Hammel, and Michael Giaimo Nominated [140]
[141]
Outstanding Animated Character in an Animated Feature Svetla Radivoeva, Marc Bryant, Richard E. Lehmann, and Cameron Black for "The Water Nøkk" Nominated
Outstanding Created Environment in an Animated Feature Samy Segura, Jay V. Jackson, Justin Cram, and Scott Townsend for "Giants' Gorge" Nominated
Outstanding Effects Simulations in an Animated Feature Erin V. Ramos, Scott Townsend, Thomas Wickes, and Rattanin Sirinaruemarn Won

Notes

  1. ^ Sometimes stylized as Frozen 2.
  2. ^ a b As depicted in Frozen (2013).
  3. ^ As depicted in Frozen Fever (2015).

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Further reading

External links

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