To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

French Leave (1930 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

French Leave
"French Leave" (1930).jpg
Directed byJack Raymond
Written byReginald Berkeley (play and screenplay)
W. P. Lipscomb
Produced byHenry Defries
Sam Harrison
StarringMadeleine Carroll
Sydney Howard
Arthur Chesney
CinematographyBernard Knowles
Production
company
D&H Productions
Distributed bySterling Films
Release date
21 August 1930 (London) (UK)
Running time
100 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

French Leave is a 1930 British comedy film directed by Jack Raymond and starring Madeleine Carroll, Sydney Howard and Arthur Chesney.[1] It was made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios.[2] It is based on a play by Reginald Berkeley, a "light comedy in three acts", set during the First World War.[3] It was remade in 1937 by Norman Lee.[4]

Plot

During World War I, Captain's wife Dorothy Glenister finds it hard being separated from her husband, so she travels to France to the village where he's stationed. Dorothy disguises herself as the daughter of a local, which leads to complications when she's suspected of being a German spy.

Cast

Critical reception

The New York Times called it "a moderately amusing British picturization of the stage farce, "French Leave," with the charming Madeleine Carroll... the photography is sometimes none too clear, but the voices are nicely recorded";[5] while more recently, TV Guide thought it a "lame comedy...Long and tedious at 60 minutes; the original British cut ran 100 minutes."[6]

References

  1. ^ "French Leave". British Film Institute. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  2. ^ Wood p.69.
  3. ^ Wintour, Barry (25 April 2014). Britain and the Great War, 1914-1918: A Subject Bibliography of Some Selected Aspects. Lulu.com. ISBN 9780992808105 – via Google Books.
  4. ^ "French Leave (1937)". British Film Institute. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  5. ^ Mordaunt Hall (7 December 1931). "THE SCREEN; Another Phase of the War. A British Farce. Sensational Journalism. Movietone News".
  6. ^ "French Leave". TV Guide. Retrieved 11 September 2018.

Bibliography

  • Low, Rachael. Filmmaking in 1930s Britain. George Allen & Unwin, 1985.
  • Wood, Linda. British Films, 1927-1939. British Film Institute, 1986.

External links

This page was last edited on 19 February 2022, at 01:08
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.