To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Foster's Mound

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Foster's Mound
22 AD 503
Location in Mississippi today
LocationNatchez, MississippiAdams County, Mississippi USA
RegionAdams County, Mississippi
Coordinates31°35′54.31″N 91°19′49.98″W / 31.5984194°N 91.3305500°W / 31.5984194; -91.3305500
History
PeriodsFoster Phase
CulturesPlaquemine culture
Site notes
Excavation dates1971-72
ArchaeologistsJeffrey P. Brain
Architecture
Architectural detailsNumber of monuments:
Foster's Mound
Nearest cityNatchez, Mississippi
Area25 acres (10 ha)
Built1840
Architectural styleGreek Revival
NRHP reference #82003091[1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 2, 1982
Responsible body: private

Foster's Mound (22 AD 503) is a Plaquemine culture archaeological site located in Adams County, Mississippi northeast of Natchez off US 61. It is the type site for the Foster Phase (1350-1500 CE) of the Natchez Bluffs Plaquemine culture chronology. It was added to the NRHP on September 2, 1982 as NRIS number 82003091.[2]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/2
    Views:
    75 483
    3 272
  • ✪ How to Make Tiramisu - Tiramisu Best Classic Italian Dessert Recipe
  • ✪ kingdrop 2017 | Ameri-Khan Holocaust, "The Dog-Headed Beast Who Became St. Christopher" | Roll Call

Transcription

[Intro music] Tiramisu is an Italian version of the cheesecake. You will not use the cream cheese to make it, but a typical Italian fresh cheese, mascarpone. Tiramisu means pick me up in Italian. May be because of the espresso coffee that enters into the confection of that delicious dessert. To make a classic tiramisu you will need eggs, sugar, mascarpone, whipping cream, espresso coffee if you don’t have an espresso machine, you may use espresso powder for instant; but it has to be very strong, lady finger cookies, cocoa powder and amaretto. Separate the yolks. Place the yolks in a large bowl and the egg white in a medium size bowl. Incorporate half of the sugar into the egg yolk using an electric whisk. Then add the mascarpone to the egg yolk mixture. Incorporate the mascarpone to start with on low speed and then you can increase the speed. Clean the sides of the bowl with the spatula just to make sure there is no egg yolks on the side. And you can see, little bit, some traces of egg yolks. To check if it is ready or if you have whisked enough, dip 2 fingers in the mixture, roll them and make sure there is no traces of sugar on your finger. If you see a few grains, keep whisking. And if not, you are done for that step. Clean your whisk as we are going to use that again for the cream and then the egg whites. Whip the cream. Perfect. This is what we call it soft picks. That’s the mix. Soft picks. Keep your cream in the fridge. Clean your whisk and now it is time for us to whisk our egg whites. To break the egg a little bit and incorporate the rest of the sugar slowly. You want to have your egg whites very firm. Let me show you another example of picks. That’s a perfect pick. Egg whites should be very firm to do this! If they slide, they are not firm at all. Now let’s put everything together. So we are going to add the cream into the mascarpone mixture. Fold in. On the sides. Then when you don’t see the cream any more, put some, about a third of the egg whites. And same thing. Fold in. Add the rest. Hmmm, this is so good. This is a very good dessert. Today tiramisu is extremely popular and there is many, many variations of the tiramisu. I am using amaretto. I am using Disaronno which is the best brand, the best quality. You may use also marsala, brandy or Kalhua liquor. So 1 tablespoon, 2, and 3 and 1 for the chef. Here we go. Add the coffee. Mix well. Taste. Put more alcohol if you want. Now we are going to soak the lady finger in the coffee mixture. But what I say soak, it’s going to be in and out very quickly. At the heart of the cookie will stay dry. The reason is overnight, the most of the cream is going to go to the heart of the cookie, or the lady finger, and it won’t be too mushy. Ok. It should be soft but not totally mushy like a sponge. Ok. So, I’ll show you. Very often people have the tendency to over soak in the coffee, the ladyfingers. And then it’s too soft, too mushy at the end. Tomorrow the tiramisu will be perfect. Cover the lady finger with about half of the cream. So... make sure that all the lady finger are totally covered by the cream and repeat the operation again. This is a traditional recipe and the dish I am using, the rectangular dish like that, this is very traditional. Today we find modern versions of tiramisu served in a glass or in a cup. It looks wonderful and they are chilled faster. Cover the second layer with the cream. Again, make sure that all the lady fingers are totally covered by the cream. Our tiramisu is finished for today. Keep it refrigerated for 1 day and tomorrow we will sprinkle the cocoa powder and serve it. Our tiramisu has been chilling for 24 hours. It is firm. So now, it is time for us to add the finishing touch. So let’s put some cocoa powder on a little sieve and sprinkle over the tiramisu. Make sure you have an even layer of cocoa powder, but not thick layer. Clean the sides. And serve your tiramisu very cold. Add the cocoa powder over the tiramisu at the last minute. If you do it too much in advance, then it could turn into a paste. Tiramisu! Pick me up! Bon Appétit!

Description

The Foster's site has two platform mounds and is located on the northern bank of St. Catherine Creek near its confluence with the Mississippi River. The largest mound, Mound A, is 3 metres (9.8 ft) in height and 30 metres (98 ft) by 30 metres (98 ft) at its base and has had a plantation house on its summit since the 1790s. Its dimensions were originally smaller but it was enlarged to accommodate the veranda of the plantation house. Mound B is 220 metres (720 ft) to the south across a large plaza area. It is an amorphous blob about 1.5 metres (4.9 ft) at its highest point. It has been seriously eroded by the creek and is barely recognizable as a rectangular platform mound. The site sat at a major crossroads in Precolumbian times, because of its location on the original route of the Natchez Trace, directly connected to Emerald Mound to the northeast and the Grand Village of the Natchez to the southwest, and its proximity to the Mississippi River. The site was excavated in 1971-72 by Jeffrey P. Brain as part of the Lower Mississippi Survey for the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology of Harvard University. Pottery recovered from beneath the mounds was found to be proto-Natchezan and was instrumental in defining the protohistoric Foster Phase (1350 to 1500 CE) of the Plaquemine culture chronology.[3]

References

  1. ^ National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ "National Register of Historic Places". Retrieved 2011-10-26.
  3. ^ Steponaitis, Vincas P. (1974). The Late Prehistory of the Natchez Region : Excavations at the Emerald and Foster Sites, Adams County, Mississippi (PDF) (Bachelor's thesis). Cambridge: Department of Anthropology, Harvard University.

External links


This page was last edited on 8 January 2019, at 18:37
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.