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Flag of Kuwait

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kuwait
Flag of Kuwait.svg
NameAlam Baladii, Derti
UseCivil and state flag, national ensign
Proportion1:2
Adopted7 September 1961
Officially hoisted 24 November 1961
DesignA horizontal triband of green, white and red; with a black trapezium based on the hoist side.

The flag of Kuwait (Arabic: علم الكويت‎) was adopted on September 7, 1961, and officially hoisted November 24, 1961. Before 1961, the flag of Kuwait was red and white, like those of other Persian Gulf states at the time, with the field being red and words or charges being written in white.

During the period of Ottoman rule in Kuwait, the Ottoman flag, red with a white crescent and star, was used. This flag was retianed after the country became a British protectorate in the Anglo-Kuwaiti Agreement of 1899. Two proposed different flag design were proposed but not adopted in the period after this. The first proposal in 1906, a red flag with white Western letters spelling KOWEIT and the second in 1913, the Ottoman flag but the word كويت (Kuwait) in Arabic writing as a canton.[1][2]

The Ottoman flag was however used until the First World War in 1914, when friendly-fire incidents with the British in the Mesopotamian campaign around the river Shatt al-Arab occurred due to both Kuwait and the enemy Ottomans both using the same flag. At this time, Kuwait adopted a new flag, red with the كويت (Kuwait) in Arabic writing[3][1][2] This flag was in use until 1921, when Sheikh Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah added the Shahada to the flag.[4][1][2] This version was in use until 1940, when he also added the Wasm to the flag.[1][2] These flags were also depicted on the Emblems of Kuwait. The red flag remained the national flag of Kuwait until the adoption of the current one in September 1961. The present flag is in the Pan-Arab colours, but each colour is also significant in its own right. Black represents the defeat of the enemy, while red is the colour of blood on the Shiv swords. White symbolizes purity, and green is for the fertile land.

Colour Symbolism
Green our lands
White our deeds
Red our swords
Black our battles

The colours' meaning came from a poem by Safie Al-Deen Al-Hali:

  • White are our deeds
  • Black are our battles
  • Green are our lands
  • Red are our swords

Rules of hanging and flying the flag:

  • Horizontally: The green stripe should be on top.
  • Vertically: The red stripe should be on the left side of the flag.
Peter Lynn's Kuwaiti Flag kite
Peter Lynn's Kuwaiti Flag kite

In 2005, it became the design of the world's largest kite at a size of 1019 square metres. It was made in New Zealand by Peter Lynn, launched to the public for the first time in 2004 in the United Kingdom, officially launched in Kuwait in 2005, and has not been surpassed since.

YouTube Encyclopedic

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Transcription

Standard of the Emir

The current Emir of Kuwait is known to have a personal royal standard. The flag of the Emir was the national one with a yellow crown on the green stripe which as used from the 1980s to this day.

Historical flags of Kuwait

References

  1. ^ a b c d Hubert de Vries (2018) [2011]. "KUWAIT دولة الكويت". hubert-herald.nl. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d Mello Luchtenberg. "Kuwait". vexilla-mundi.com. Retrieved 10 January 2019.
  3. ^ Nunn, Wilfred (1932). Tigris Gunboats: The Forgotten War in Iraq, 1914-1917. Naval Institute Press. p. 33. ISBN 978-1861763082.
  4. ^ Farkas Al-Rashoud, Claudia (1993). Kuwait's Age of Sail : Pearl Divers, Sea Captains, and Shipbuilders Past and Present. Husain Mohammed Rafie Marafie. ASIN B000E4QEN4.
This page was last edited on 12 January 2019, at 09:25
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