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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Fengyun 2-07
20090829 Model of Fengyun-2 4002.JPG
Model of Fengyun-2 meteorological satellite in Shanghai Science & Technology Museum.
Mission typeWeather
OperatorNational Satellite Meteorological Centre
COSPAR ID2012-002A
SATCAT no.38049
Spacecraft properties
Launch mass1,369 kilograms (3,018 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date13 January 2012, 00:56 (2012-01-13UTC00:56Z) UTC
RocketChang Zheng 3A Y22
Launch siteXichang LA-3
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric
RegimeGeostationary
Longitude86.5° East
Perigee altitude35,784 kilometres (22,235 mi)
Apogee altitude35,796 kilometres (22,243 mi)
Inclination1.00 degrees
Period1,435.98 minutes
Epoch31 October 2013, 22:00:50 UTC[1]
 

Fengyun 2-07[2] or FY-2-07 (Chinese: 风云二号07 meaning Wind Cloud 2-07), also known as Fengyun-2F or FY-2F, is a Chinese weather satellite operated by China's National Satellite Meteorological Centre.[3] Part of the Fengyun programme, it was the sixth Fengyun 2 geostationary satellite to be launched.[4]

Fengyun 2-07 was launched by a Long March 3A carrier rocket, with the serial number Y22,[5] flying from Launch Area 3 at the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre. The launch took place on 13 January 2012 at 00:56 UTC, and resulted in the successful deployment of the satellite into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. After raising itself into its operational geostationary orbit, by means of an FG-36 apogee motor,[4] the satellite will be positioned at a longitude of 86.5 degrees East.[6]

At launch, Fengyun 2-07 had a mass of 1,369 kilograms (3,018 lb), however by the time it reaches its operational orbit, this will have decreased to 536 kilograms (1,182 lb), partly through jettisoning the FG-36. The spacecraft is cylindrical, with a diameter of 2.1 metres (6 ft 11 in), and a length of 4.5 metres (15 ft) fully deployed. It is spin-stabilised at a rate of 100 rpm,[4] and carries a five-channel Stretched Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer, or S-VISSR, capable of producing visible light and infrared images of the Earth. The S-VISSR will return visible-light images with a resolution of 1.25 kilometres (0.78 mi), and infrared images with a resolution of 5 kilometres (3.1 mi). It will produce a full-disc image every thirty minutes, as well as imaging smaller areas of interest.[7] In addition to S-VISSR, Fengyun 2-07 also carries an x-ray detector to monitor the Sun, and detect solar flares.[5]

References

  1. ^ "FENGYUN 2F Satellite details 2012-002A NORAD 38049". N2YO. 31 October 2013. Retrieved 31 October 2013.
  2. ^ 长三甲遥二十二火箭将发射风云二号卫星 (in Chinese). China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology. 15 December 2011. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  3. ^ "Feng-Yun-2". AllMetSat. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  4. ^ a b c Krebs, Gunter. "FY 2A, 2B, 2C, 2D, 2E, 2F, 2G, 2H". Gunter's Space Page. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  5. ^ a b Barbosa, Rui C. (12 January 2012). "China launch again – Long March 3A launches FengYun-2F". NASASpaceflight.com. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  6. ^ "Status of current and future CGMS Members' satellites". World Meteorological Organization. 15 December 2011. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.
  7. ^ "Stretched Visible and Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (S-VISSR)". World Meteorological Organization. June 2008. Archived from the original on 13 January 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2012.

This page was last edited on 29 January 2021, at 19:01
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