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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Type 17
U.S. Coast Guard Franco-British Aviation Viking OO-1, in October 1936.jpg
Viking OO-1 in USCG service
Role Flying boat trainer
Manufacturer FBA
Designer Louis Schreck
First flight April 1923
Number built >300

The FBA 17 was a training flying boat produced in France in the 1920s.

Design and development

Similar in general layout to the aircraft that FBA had produced during World War I, the Type 17 was a conventional two-bay biplane with unequal-span, unstaggered wings and side-by-side open cockpits. The pusher engine was mounted on struts in the interplane gap. Apart from their use by the French Navy, a small number were sold to the Polish Navy, the Brazilian Air Force, and civil operators as well. Some versions were built as amphibians, and others had fittings to allow them to be catapulted from warships.

In 1931, the US Coast Guard purchased an example for evaluation, and being pleased with the design, arranged for the type to be built under licence by the Viking Flying Boat Company in New Haven, Connecticut. Six aircraft were eventually produced and served with the Coast Guard under the designation OO until the outbreak of World War II.

Variants

17 HE.2
(Hydravion d'École) 2-seat trainer, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (over 300 built).
17 HL.1
(Hydravion de Liaison) 1-seat catapulatable liaison aircraft, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (1 built)
17 HL.2
2-seat catapultable liaison aircraft, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (10 built)
17 HMT.2
FBA 17 HMT.2 photo from L'Aéronautique December,1926
FBA 17 HMT.2 photo from L'Aéronautique December,1926
(Hydravion Mixte de Transport) 2-seat amphibious transport aircraft, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (37 built)
17 HMB.2
17 HMT 2s already in service with the French Navy, were redesignated HMB 2, after being fitted with a bomb rack on the port side of the hull.
17 HMT.4
4-seat amphibious transport aircraft, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (2 built)
17 HT.4
(Hydravion de Transport) 4-seat transport aircraft, Hispano-Suiza 8A-powered, (35 built)
171 HE.2
2-seat trainer, Lorraine Mizar-powered, (1 built).
172 HE.2
2-seat trainer, Gnome et Rhône 5B-powered, (5 built).
172 HMT.2
2-seat amphibious transport aircraft, Gnome et Rhône 5B-powered, (1 built).
172 HT.4
4-seat transport aircraft, Gnome et Rhône 5B-powered, (1 built).
172/2
The HT.4 was redesignated Type 172/2, Gnome et Rhône 5B-powered, after it was fitted with extra fuel tanks.
Viking V-2
French-built HT.4s converted to 2-seaters (4 converted)
Viking OO-1
longer-span, Wright R-760-powered version of V-2 produced for USCG (5 built)

Operators

 Brazil
 France
 Poland
 United States
China

Specifications (17 HE.2)

FBA 17 HMT.2 3-view drawing from L'Aéronautique July,1926
FBA 17 HMT.2 3-view drawing from L'Aéronautique July,1926

Data from Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928,[1] Aviafrance:F.B.A. 17 HE.2[2]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Length: 8.94 m (29 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 12.87 m (42 ft 3 in)
  • Height: 3.2 m (10 ft 6 in)
  • Wing area: 36.5 m2 (393 sq ft)
  • Empty weight: 850 kg (1,874 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,150 kg (2,535 lb)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 162 km/h (101 mph, 87 kn)
  • Landing speed: 80 km/h (50 mph; 43 kn)
  • Range: 360 km (220 mi, 190 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 5,000 m (16,000 ft)
  • Time to altitude: 2,000 m (6,600 ft) in 9 minutes; 3,000 m (9,800 ft) in 17 minutes 30 seconds
  • Wing loading: 31.5 kg/m2 (6.5 lb/sq ft)
  • Power/mass: 0.1166 kW/kg (0.0709 hp/lb)

See also

Related lists

References

  1. ^ Grey, C.G., ed. (1928). Jane's all the World's Aircraft 1928. London: Sampson Low, Marston & company, ltd. pp. 102c–103c.
  2. ^ Parmentier, Bruno (10 December 1998). "F.B.A. 17 HE 2". Aviafrance (in French). Paris. Retrieved 20 February 2018.

Further reading

  • Bousquet, Gérard (2013). French Flying Boats of WW II. Sandomierz, Poland: Stratus. ISBN 978-83-63678-06-7.
  • Cortet, Pierre (September 2000). "Rétros du Mois" [Retros of the Month]. Avions: Toute l'Aéronautique et son histoire (in French) (90): 4. ISSN 1243-8650.
  • Morareau, Lucien (December 1998). "L'escadrille du bout du monde" [Squadron at the End of the World]. Avions: Toute l'Aéronautique et son histoire (in French) (69): 42–51. ISSN 1243-8650.
  • Nelcarz, Bartolomiej & Peczkowski, Robert (April 2000). "Les appareils français dans la Marine Polonaise" [French Aircraft of the Polish Navy]. Avions: Toute l'Aéronautique et son histoire (in French) (85): 22–27. ISSN 1243-8650.
  • Nelcarz, Bartolomiej & Peczkowski, Robert (2001). White Eagles: The Aircraft, Men and Operations of the Polish Air Force 1918–1939. Ottringham, UK: Hikoki Publications. ISBN 1-902109-73-2.
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. p. 382.

External links

This page was last edited on 30 January 2021, at 01:28
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