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Eurovision Song Contest 2007

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Eurovision Song Contest 2007
True Fantasy
Eurovision Song Contest 2007 logo.svg
Dates
Semi-final10 May 2007 (2007-05-10)
Final12 May 2007 (2007-05-12)
Host
VenueHartwall Areena
Helsinki, Finland
Presenter(s)
Directed byTimo Suomi
Executive supervisorSvante Stockselius
Executive producerHeikki Seppälä
Host broadcasterYleisradio (Yle)
Opening act
Interval act
Websiteeurovision.tv/event/helsinki-2007 Edit this at Wikidata
Participants
Number of entries42
Debuting countries
Returning countries
Non-returning countries Monaco
  • Belgium in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Italy in the Eurovision Song ContestNetherlands in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Switzerland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Germany in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Monaco in the Eurovision Song ContestLuxembourg in the Eurovision Song ContestSpain in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Ireland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Denmark in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Finland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Norway in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Portugal in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Sweden in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Israel in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Greece in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Malta in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Austria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007France in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Turkey in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Morocco in the Eurovision Song ContestCyprus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Iceland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Bosnia and Herzegovina in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Croatia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Slovenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Estonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Slovakia in the Eurovision Song ContestHungary in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Romania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Lithuania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Poland in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Russia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Macedonia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Latvia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Ukraine in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Albania in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Andorra in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Belarus in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Bulgaria in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Moldova in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Armenia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Czech Republic in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Georgia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Montenegro in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007Serbia in the Eurovision Song Contest 2007A coloured map of the countries of Europe
    About this image
         Participating countries     Did not qualify from the semi final     Countries that participated in the past but not in 2007
Vote
Voting systemEach country awarded 12, 10, 8–1 point(s) to their 10 favourite songs.
Nul pointsNone
Winning song
2006 ← Eurovision Song Contest → 2008

The Eurovision Song Contest 2007 was the 52nd edition of the Eurovision Song Contest. It took place in Helsinki, Finland, following the country's victory at the 2006 contest with the song "Hard Rock Hallelujah" by Lordi. It was the first time Finland had hosted the contest - 46 years after the country made its debut. It was the first contest hosted in a Nordic country since 2001 in Copenhagen. Organised by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and host broadcaster Yleisradio (Yle), the contest was held at the Hartwall Areena, and consisted of a semi-final on 10 May, and the final on 12 May 2007. The two live shows were presented by Jaana Pelkonen and Mikko Leppilampi. In addition, Krisse Salminen acted as guest host in the green room, and reported from the crowds at the Senate Square.

Forty-two countries participated in the contest - three more than the previous record of thirty-nine, that took part in 2005. The EBU decided to put aside its limit of 40 countries, which would have meant excluding some countries using a ranking order scheme.[2] The Czech Republic and Georgia made their first participation this year, with Montenegro and Serbia taking part as independent nations for the first time.[3] Austria and Hungary both returned, after their absence from the previous edition. Meanwhile, Monaco decided not to participate.[4]

The winner was Serbia with the song "Molitva", performed by Marija Šerifović and written by Vladimir Graić and Saša Milošević Mare. This was Serbia's first victory in the contest, and indeed, the first year they competed as an independent nation. Also, this was the first victory for one of the former Yugoslav republics. It was also the first winning song entirely performed in a country's native language since Israel's "Diva" in 1998. Ukraine, Russia, Turkey and Bulgaria rounded out the top five. Further down the table, Belarus achieved their best placing to date, finishing sixth. Meanwhile, Ireland achieved their worst placing in the contest, finishing twenty-fourth (last place). Of the "Big Four" countries Germany placed the highest, finishing nineteenth.

Location

Hartwall Areena, Helsinki - host venue of the 2007 contest.
Hartwall Areena, Helsinki - host venue of the 2007 contest.

Helsinki, the Finnish capital, was chosen as the host city, although other cities were in the running; the second-largest city of Espoo, the third-largest city of Tampere, and the city of Turku all submitted bids to host the contest.

In the end, Helsinki was chosen, with the host venue being the Hartwall Areena. The venue is a large multi-functional indoor arena, which opened in 1997, and can take some 12,000-15,000 spectators for concerts. Its name comes from its largest sponsor, the beverage company Hartwall, also based in Helsinki. For the contest, the arena was referred to as the Helsinki Arena.

Format

On 12 March 2007, the draws for the running order for the semi-final, final and voting procedure took place. A new feature allowed five wild-card countries from the semi-final and three countries from the final to choose their starting position. The heads of delegation went on stage and chose the number they would take. In the semi-final, Austria, Andorra, Turkey, Slovenia and Latvia were able to choose their positions. In the final, Armenia, Ukraine and Germany were able to exercise this privilege. All countries opted for spots in the second half of both evenings. Shortly after the draw, the entries were approved by the EBU, ending the possibility of disqualification for the Israeli song.[citation needed] The United Kingdom chose their entry after the deadline because they were granted special dispensation from the EBU.

The contest saw some minor changes to the voting time-frame. The compilation summary video of all entries including phone numbers was shown twice. The voting process was the same as 2006 except there was fifteen minutes to vote, an increase of five minutes on the 2006 Contest. In the final, the results from each country were once again shown from one to seven points automatically on screen and only eight, ten and twelve were read by the spokespeople. For the first time, the winner was awarded a promotion tour around Europe, visiting Denmark, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, Greece and Germany. The tour was held between 16 May and 21 May. The event was sponsored by Nordic communications group TeliaSonera, and — as with several previous contests — Nobel Biocare. Apocalyptica were the interval act, and played a medley of songs: Worlds Collide, Faraway and finally Life Burns!, but without the usual lyrics.

Visual design

The official logo of the contest remained the same as 2006; the flag in the centre of the heart was changed to the Finnish flag. The European Broadcasting Union and YLE announced that the theme for the 2007 contest would be "True Fantasy", which embraced Finland and "Finnishness" in terms of the polarities associated with the country.[5] The design agency Dog Design was responsible for the design of the visual theme of the contest which incorporated vibrant kaleidoscopic patterns formed from various symbols including exclamation marks and the letter F.[6] The stage was in the shape of a kantele, a traditional Finnish instrument. On 20 February 2007 a reworked official website for the contest was launched marking the first public exhibition of this year's theme. An official CD and DVD were released (but no HD DVD or Blu-ray, despite the event being broadcast in high definition for the first time). An official fan book was also released. The themes of the postcards (short videos between the acts) were short stories happening in different Finnish places.

Participating countries

Participating countries in a Eurovision Song Contest must be active members of the EBU.

42 countries submitted preliminary applications. Although in previous years the maximum number of participating countries was 40, the EBU allowed all 42 to participate in 2007. The Czech Republic, Serbia, Montenegro and Georgia all entered the contest for the first time in 2007.[3] Monaco announced its non-participation on 12 December 2006,[4] and the EBU announced the final lineup of 42 countries on 15 December 2006.

Returning artists

Artist Country Previous year(s)
Evridiki  Cyprus 1983 (backing singer for Stavros & Constantina), 1987 (backing singer for Alexia), 1992, 1994
Eiríkur Hauksson  Iceland 1986 (as part of ICY) and 1991 (for  Norway, as part of Just 4 Fun)
Karolina Gočeva  Macedonia 2002
Edsilia  Netherlands 1998

Semi-final

The semi-final was held on 10 May 2007 at 21:00 (CET). 28 countries performed and all 42 participants voted.

Draw Country Artist Song Language[7] Place[8] Points
01  Bulgaria Elitsa Todorova & Stoyan Yankoulov "Water" Bulgarian 6 146
02  Israel Teapacks "Push the Button" English, French, Hebrew 24 17
03  Cyprus Evridiki "Comme ci, comme ça" French 15 65
04  Belarus Dmitry Koldun "Work Your Magic" English 4 176
05  Iceland Eiríkur Hauksson "Valentine Lost" English 13 77
06  Georgia Sopho Khalvashi "Visionary Dream" English 8 123
07  Montenegro Stevan Faddy "'Ajde, kroči" ('Ајде, крочи) Montenegrin 22 33
08   Switzerland DJ BoBo "Vampires Are Alive" English 20 40
09  Moldova Natalia Barbu "Fight" English 10 91
10  Netherlands Edsilia Rombley "On Top of the World" English 21 38
11  Albania Frederik Ndoci "Hear My Plea" English, Albanian 17 49
12  Denmark DQ "Drama Queen" English 19 45
13  Croatia Dragonfly feat. Dado Topić "Vjerujem u ljubav" Croatian, English 16 54
14  Poland The Jet Set "Time to Party" English 14 75
15  Serbia Marija Šerifović "Molitva" (Молитва) Serbian 1 298
16  Czech Republic Kabát "Malá dáma" Czech 28 1
17  Portugal Sabrina "Dança comigo" Portuguese, English[a] 11 88
18  Macedonia Karolina "Mojot svet" (Мојот свет) Macedonian, English 9 97
19  Norway Guri Schanke "Ven a bailar conmigo" English[b] 18 48
20  Malta Olivia Lewis "Vertigo" English 25 15
21  Andorra Anonymous "Salvem el món" Catalan, English 12 80
22  Hungary Magdi Rúzsa "Unsubstantial Blues" English 2 224
23  Estonia Gerli Padar "Partners in Crime" English 22 33
24  Belgium The KMG's "Love Power" English 26 14
25  Slovenia Alenka Gotar "Cvet z juga" Slovene 7 140
26  Turkey Kenan Doğulu "Shake It Up Şekerim" English 3 197
27  Austria Eric Papilaya "Get a Life – Get Alive" English 27 4
28  Latvia Bonaparti.lv "Questa notte" Italian 5 168

Final

The finalists were:

The final was held on 12 May 2007 at 21:00 (CET) and was won by Serbia.

Draw Country Artist Song Language[7] Place[9] Points
01  Bosnia and Herzegovina Marija Šestić "Rijeka bez imena" (Ријека без имена) Serbian 11 106
02  Spain D'NASH "I Love You Mi Vida" Spanish[c] 20 43
03  Belarus Dmitry Koldun "Work Your Magic" English 6 145
04  Ireland Dervish "They Can't Stop the Spring" English 24 5
05  Finland Hanna Pakarinen "Leave Me Alone" English 17 53
06  Macedonia Karolina "Mojot svet" (Мојот свет) Macedonian, English 14 73
07  Slovenia Alenka Gotar "Cvet z juga" Slovene 15 66
08  Hungary Magdi Rúzsa "Unsubstantial Blues" English 9 128
09  Lithuania 4Fun "Love or Leave" English 21 28
10  Greece Sarbel "Yassou Maria" (Γεια σου Μαρία) English[d] 7 139
11  Georgia Sopho Khalvashi "Visionary Dream" English 12 97
12  Sweden The Ark "The Worrying Kind" English 18 51
13  France Les Fatals Picards "L'amour à la française" French, English ("Franglais") 22 19
14  Latvia Bonaparti.lv "Questa notte" Italian 16 54
15  Russia Serebro "Song #1" English 3 207
16  Germany Roger Cicero "Frauen regier'n die Welt" German, English 19 49
17  Serbia Marija Šerifović "Molitva" (Молитва) Serbian 1 268
18  Ukraine Verka Serduchka "Dancing Lasha Tumbai" German, English, Ukrainian, Russian 2 235
19  United Kingdom Scooch "Flying the Flag (For You)" English 22 19
20  Romania Todomondo "Liubi, Liubi, I Love You" (Люби, Люби, I Love You) English, Italian, Spanish, Russian, French, Romanian 13 84
21  Bulgaria Elitsa Todorova & Stoyan Yankoulov "Water" Bulgarian 5 157
22  Turkey Kenan Doğulu "Shake It Up Şekerim" English 4 163
23  Armenia Hayko "Anytime You Need" English, Armenian 8 138
24  Moldova Natalia Barbu "Fight" English 10 109

Scoreboard

All countries participating in the contest were required to use televoting and/or SMS voting during both evenings of the contest. In the event of technical difficulties, or if the votes of the country did not meet the EBU threshold, then a back-up jury's results were to be used. Albania and Andorra were the only countries that used juries. A draw was held in Helsinki to establish the order in which the countries presented their votes during the final.

Semi-final

Semi-final voting results[10]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Montenegro
Belarus
Armenia
Andorra
Austria
France
Denmark
Greece
Spain
Serbia
Finland
Turkey
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Belgium
Portugal
Albania
Romania
Cyprus
Croatia
Slovenia
Israel
Germany
Lithuania
Norway
Switzerland
Czech Republic
Netherlands
Ireland
Malta
Estonia
Georgia
Bulgaria
Sweden
Ukraine
Russia
Latvia
Iceland
Poland
Moldova
United Kingdom
Macedonia
Hungary
Contestants
Bulgaria 146 5 1 6 8 10 10 5 2 12 3 2 5 1 1 12 6 3 6 4 10 3 3 2 5 6 7 8
Israel 17 6 4 2 3 1 1
Cyprus 65 4 5 12 5 8 7 4 3 7 10
Belarus 176 4 12 1 7 4 5 2 1 4 3 10 12 10 3 5 6 7 7 4 6 3 12 12 10 4 4 12 4 2
Iceland 77 3 10 12 5 12 6 1 12 6 10
Georgia 123 8 8 4 6 3 4 10 1 7 8 8 5 10 3 10 10 7 3 8
Montenegro 33 8 5 7 5 5 3
Switzerland 40 6 3 2 2 1 2 8 10 2 4
Moldova 91 12 7 3 6 8 12 12 6 3 2 7 1 6 6
Netherlands 38 5 4 10 3 1 1 1 8 5
Albania 49 6 3 8 4 4 3 1 7 2 1 10
Denmark 45 2 3 5 4 1 5 6 4 8 7
Croatia 54 7 7 6 10 3 8 2 5 6
Poland 75 1 5 5 10 4 3 2 2 3 5 3 10 6 5 1 2 3 2 3
Serbia 298 12 10 10 12 7 6 5 5 8 12 4 4 2 6 8 12 12 7 10 1 8 12 12 10 8 1 8 8 10 8 8 2 10 5 6 5 12 12
Czech Republic 1 1
Portugal 88 7 6 12 10 8 1 3 1 1 7 8 4 3 10 7
Macedonia 97 10 5 10 6 7 10 2 8 10 6 6 12 5
Norway 48 2 3 3 7 4 1 2 3 2 4 6 7 2 1 1
Malta 15 7 6 2
Andorra 80 4 4 12 5 2 6 2 4 2 2 2 7 4 5 2 4 6 6 1
Hungary 224 1 4 8 2 12 1 12 10 1 1 7 10 5 10 4 7 6 6 7 10 4 8 8 7 4 8 10 4 8 4 3 8 12 8 4
Estonia 33 6 6 3 2 12 4
Belgium 14 2 12
Slovenia 140 8 6 8 2 1 7 7 3 6 6 7 4 10 5 4 6 1 5 5 7 5 5 7 3 5 7
Turkey 197 3 2 7 10 12 8 2 7 8 12 12 8 12 6 10 1 12 10 7 1 7 3 1 10 12 8 6
Austria 4 1 3
Latvia 168 2 1 5 1 3 8 8 5 5 4 7 10 12 7 2 3 7 12 12 12 5 1 3 2 5 12 2 8 4

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the semi-final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
9  Serbia  Austria,  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Croatia,  Czech Republic,  Hungary,  Macedonia,  Montenegro,  Slovenia,   Switzerland
6  Turkey  Albania,  Belgium,  France,  Germany,  Netherlands,  United Kingdom
5  Belarus  Armenia,  Israel,  Moldova,  Russia,  Ukraine
 Latvia  Estonia,  Ireland,  Lithuania,  Malta,  Poland
3  Hungary  Denmark,  Iceland,  Serbia
 Iceland  Finland,  Norway,  Sweden
 Moldova  Belarus,  Portugal,  Romania
2  Bulgaria  Cyprus,  Turkey
1  Andorra  Spain
 Belgium  Georgia
 Cyprus  Greece
 Estonia  Latvia
 Macedonia  Bulgaria
 Portugal  Andorra

Final

Final voting results[11]
Voting procedure used:
  100% Televoting
  100% Jury vote
Total score
Montenegro
Belarus
Armenia
Andorra
Austria
France
Denmark
Greece
Spain
Serbia
Finland
Turkey
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Belgium
Portugal
Albania
Romania
Cyprus
Croatia
Slovenia
Israel
Germany
Lithuania
Norway
Switzerland
Czech Republic
Netherlands
Ireland
Malta
Estonia
Georgia
Bulgaria
Sweden
Ukraine
Russia
Latvia
Iceland
Poland
Moldova
United Kingdom
Macedonia
Hungary
Contestants
Bosnia and Herzegovina 106 7 1 8 1 7 8 10 8 10 8 3 6 8 4 7 6 4
Spain 43 4 6 1 3 8 12 2 5 2
Belarus 145 3 10 5 2 4 1 2 1 6 12 7 2 10 7 8 1 12 12 8 4 7 10 7 4
Ireland 5 5
Finland 53 1 7 4 1 5 4 1 6 12 12
Macedonia 73 10 1 10 1 8 3 8 10 6 5 1 10
Slovenia 66 8 4 3 5 7 2 3 7 1 5 4 3 4 4 6
Hungary 128 6 2 8 12 10 5 2 8 4 5 7 4 8 3 4 5 1 4 5 8 5 8 2 2
Lithuania 28 2 1 12 10 3
Greece 139 3 8 3 1 2 4 4 3 8 7 10 12 1 10 4 3 5 4 12 4 5 6 10 3 7
Georgia 97 6 5 3 7 5 1 6 1 2 2 6 12 1 2 1 5 8 7 6 5 4 2
Sweden 51 2 12 8 12 10 7
France 19 2 8 4 3 2
Latvia 54 2 1 6 10 3 3 10 4 10 1 4
Russia 207 6 12 12 3 2 2 8 4 7 3 8 2 4 3 7 3 3 8 6 6 5 6 6 6 12 7 5 5 10 7 1 3 8 6 5 6
Germany 49 5 7 5 5 1 6 7 6 3 1 2 1
Serbia 268 12 7 7 12 8 6 4 1 12 12 7 5 1 6 3 12 12 3 8 10 12 8 8 4 8 6 6 10 6 5 3 7 8 5 12 12
Ukraine 235 2 10 6 12 4 4 3 7 7 3 6 3 5 1 12 4 4 5 4 10 5 8 2 2 12 1 8 3 8 10 3 3 8 12 6 12 7 8 2 3
United Kingdom 19 7 12
Romania 84 10 3 7 2 12 2 7 5 7 3 2 2 1 1 12 8
Bulgaria 157 5 4 6 5 12 10 6 5 6 6 4 6 5 10 6 7 4 7 7 1 3 4 2 3 5 8 10
Turkey 163 1 10 12 10 4 10 12 10 7 12 7 10 12 2 7 7 1 2 3 1 12 10 1
Armenia 138 5 5 10 6 8 12 10 8 5 2 10 10 12 8 5 10 10 2
Moldova 109 8 3 4 10 6 1 2 7 10 12 2 1 4 2 1 2 3 4 2 7 6 6 1 5

12 points

Below is a summary of all 12 points in the final:

N. Contestant Nation(s) giving 12 points
9  Serbia  Austria,  Bosnia and Herzegovina,  Croatia,  Finland,  Hungary,  Macedonia,  Montenegro,  Slovenia,   Switzerland
5  Ukraine  Andorra,  Czech Republic,  Latvia,  Poland,  Portugal
 Turkey  Belgium,  France,  Germany,  Netherlands,  United Kingdom
3  Russia  Armenia,  Belarus,  Estonia
 Belarus  Israel,  Russia,  Ukraine
2  Armenia  Georgia,  Turkey
 Finland  Iceland,  Sweden
 Greece  Bulgaria,  Cyprus
 Sweden  Denmark,  Norway
 Romania  Moldova,  Spain
1  Bulgaria  Greece
 Georgia  Lithuania
 Hungary  Serbia
 Lithuania  Ireland
 Moldova  Romania
 Spain  Albania
 United Kingdom  Malta

Broadcasters, commentators and spokespersons

Spokespersons

The order in which each country announced their votes was determined in a draw during the heads of delegation meeting. The spokespersons are shown alongside each country.[12]

  1.  Montenegro – Vidak Latković
  2.  Belarus – Juliana
  3.  ArmeniaSirusho (Armenian representative in the 2008 contest)
  4.  AndorraMarian van de Wal (Andorran representative in the 2005 contest)
  5.  Austria – Eva Pölzl
  6.  France – Vanessa Dolmen
  7.  DenmarkSusanne Georgi (Andorran representative in the 2009 contest)
  8.  Greece – Alexis Kostalas
  9.  Spain – Ainhoa Arbizu
  10.  SerbiaMaja Nikolić
  11.  FinlandLaura Voutilainen (Finnish representative in the 2002 contest)
  12.  Turkey – Meltem Ersan Yazgan
  13.  Bosnia and Herzegovina – Vesna Andree Zaimović
  14.  BelgiumMaureen Louys
  15.  Portugal – Francisco Mendes
  16.  AlbaniaLeon Menkshi
  17.  RomaniaAndreea Marin Bănică
  18.  Cyprus – Giannis Haralambous
  19.  CroatiaBarbara Kolar
  20.  SloveniaPeter Poles
  21.  IsraelJason Danino-Holt[13]
  22.  GermanyThomas Hermanns
  23.  Lithuania – Lavija Šurnaitė
  24.  NorwaySynnøve Svabø
  25.   SwitzerlandSven Epiney
  26.  Czech Republic – Andrea Savane
  27.  NetherlandsPaul de Leeuw and Edsilia Rombley
  28.  IrelandLinda Martin (Irish representative in the 1984 contest and winner of the 1992 contest)
  29.  Malta – Mireille Bonello
  30.  EstoniaLaura Põldvere (Estonian representative in the 2005 contest as part of Suntribe and in the 2017 contest alongside Koit Toome)
  31.  Georgia – Neli Agirba
  32.  BulgariaMira Dobreva
  33.  SwedenAndré Pops
  34.  Ukraine – Katya Osadcha
  35.  RussiaYana Churikova
  36.  Latvia – Jānis Šipkevics (Latvian representative in the 2006 contest as part of Cosmos)
  37.  IcelandRagnhildur Steinunn Jónsdóttir
  38.  Poland – Maciej Orłoś
  39.  Moldova – Andrei Porubin
  40.  United KingdomFearne Cotton
  41.  MacedoniaElena Risteska (Macedonian representative in the 2006 contest)
  42.  HungaryÉva Novodomszky

Broadcasters and commentators

Broadcasters and commentators in participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Albania All shows TVSH Leon Menkshi
 Andorra All shows RTVA Meri Picart and Josep Lluís Trabal [14]
 Armenia - Gohar Gasparian
 Austria - ORF2 Andi Knoll
 Belarus All shows Belarus 1 Denis Kurian and Alexander Tikhanovich
 Belgium All shows La Une French: Jean-Pierre Hautier and Jean-Louis Lahaye [15]
La Première French: Patrick Duhamel and Corinne Boulangier
één Dutch: André Vermeulen and Anja Daems
Radio 2 Dutch: Michel Follet and Sven Pichal
 Bosnia and Herzegovina All BHT1 Dejan Kukrić
 Bulgaria All shows Georgi Kushvaliev and Elena Rosberg
 Croatia All shows Duško Čurlić [16]
 Cyprus All shows RIK 1 Vaso Komninou [17]
 Czech Republic All shows Kateřina Kristelová
Final Pepa Vojtek
 Denmark All shows DR1 Søren Nystrøm Rasted and Adam Duvå Hall [18]
 Estonia - Marko Reikop [19]
 Finland All shows YLE TV2 Finnish: Heikki Paasonen and Ellen Jokikunnas [20][21]
Final YLE TV2 Finnish: Asko Murtomäki
YLE FST5 Swedish: Thomas Lundin
YLE Radio Suomi Finnish: Sanna Kojo and Jorma Hietamäki
 France Semi-final France 4 Peggy Olmi and Yann Renoard [15]
Final France 3 Julien Lepers and Tex
France Bleu Yves Derisbourg
 Georgia - Sandro Gabisonia and Sopho Altunashvili
 Germany All shows Das Erste Peter Urban [22]
Final NDR 2 Thomas Mohr [23]
hr3 Tim Frühling [24]
 Greece All shows NET Fotis Sergoulopoulos
Maria Bakodimou
 Hungary All shows M1 Gábor Gundel Takács
 Iceland - Sjónvarpið Sigmar Guðmundsson [25]
 Ireland All shows RTÉ One Marty Whelan [26][27]
RTÉ Radio 1 Larry Gogan
 Israel - No commentator
 Latvia - Kārlis Streips
 Lithuania - Darius Užkuraitis
 Macedonia - Milanka Rašić
 Malta - Antonia Micallef [28]
 Moldova - Vitalie Rotaru
 Montenegro - TVCG2 Dražen Bauković and Tamara Ivanković
 Netherlands All shows Nederland 1 Cornald Maas [29]
Final Paul de Leeuw
 Norway All shows NRK1 Per Sundnes [30]
 Poland All shows TVP1 Artur Orzech [31]
 Portugal - RTP1 Isabel Angelino [32]
- Jorge Gabriel
 Romania - TVR1 Andreea Demirgian
 Russia - Channel One Yuri Aksyuta and Yelena Batinova
 Serbia All shows RTS1 Duška Vučinić-Lučić
 Slovenia - Mojca Mavec
 Spain All shows TVE1 Beatriz Pécker [33]
 Sweden All shows SVT1 Kristian Luuk and Josef Sterzenbach [34]
SR P3 Carolina Norén [35]
  Switzerland All shows SF zwei German: Bernhard Thurnheer [15]
Semi-final TSR 2 French: Nicolas Tanner
Final French: Henri Dès
All shows TSR 2 French: Jean-Marc Richard
TSI 1 Italian: Claudio Lazzarino and Sandy Altermatt
 Turkey All shows TRT 1 Hakan Urgancı
 Ukraine All shows First National TV Channel Timur Miroshnychenko
 United Kingdom Semi-final BBC Three Paddy O'Connell and Sarah Cawood
Final BBC One Terry Wogan
BBC Radio 2 Ken Bruce
Broadcasters and commentators in non-participating countries
Country Show(s) Broadcaster(s) Commentator(s) Ref(s)
 Australia All shows SBS Des Mangan
 Azerbaijan All shows İctimai Hüsniyə Məhərrəmova
 Gibraltar Final GBC Un­known [36]

Other countries

  • Australia Australia – Although Australia was not itself eligible to enter, the semi-final and final were broadcast the event on SBS.[37] As is the case each year, they were not broadcast live due to the difference in Australian time zones. Australia aired the United Kingdom's broadcast, including commentary from Paddy O'Connell, Sarah Cawood and Terry Wogan. Before the broadcasts, viewers were told by an SBS host that the Eurovision Song Contest was one of their most popular programmes. The final rated an estimated 436,000 viewers, and was ranked number 20 on the broadcasters top rating programs of the 2006/2007 financial year.[38]
  • Azerbaijan Azerbaijan – Azerbaijan were willing to enter the contest, but since AzTV applied for active EBU membership but was denied on 18 June 2007, they missed the contest and had to wait until they were accepted. Another Azerbaijani broadcaster, İctimai Televiziya və Radio Yayımları Şirkəti, broadcast the contest. It was a passive EBU member at the time, and had broadcast it for the previous two years. It was the only non-participating broadcaster this year to send its own commentators to the contest.[39]
  • Italy Italy – Italian television had not entered since 1997. National broadcaster RAI is in strong competition with commercial TV stations and believes that Eurovision would not be a popular show in Italy, although the 1991 edition (held in Rome) was followed by 6 million people. They have not broadcast the contest in recent years, although an independent Italian channel for the gay community has shown the show.[40]

A live broadcast of the Eurovision Song Contest was broadcast worldwide by satellite through Eurovision streams such as Channel One Russia, ERT World, TVE Internacional, TVP Polonia, RTP Internacional and TVR i. The official Eurovision Song Contest website also provided a live stream without commentary using the peer-to-peer transport Octoshape.

High-definition broadcast

YLE produced the event in 1080i HD and 5.1 Surround Sound.[41] This was the first year that the event was broadcast live in HD. The BBC in the United Kingdom broadcast the final in high definition on BBC HD.[42] Swedish broadcaster SVT broadcast both the semi-final and the final on their HD-channel SVT HD.[43] However the event is only available to buy on standard-definition DVD, with no HD DVD or Blu-ray version available in high definition.

Other awards

In addition to the main winner's trophy, the Marcel Bezençon Awards and the Barbara Dex Award were contested during the 2007 Eurovision Song Contest. The OGAE (French: Organisation Générale des Amateurs de l'Eurovision, English: General Organisation of Eurovision Fans) voting poll also took place before the contest.

Marcel Bezençon Awards

The Marcel Bezençon Awards honour the best competing songs in the final. Named after the founder of the contest, the awards were created and first handed at the 2002 contest by Christer Björkman (Sweden's representative in the 1992 contest and the country's current Head of Delegation), and Richard Herrey (a member of the Herreys who won the 1984 contest for Sweden).[44] The awards are divided into three categories: Artistic Award which was voted by previous winners of the contest, Composers Award, and Press Award.[45]

Category Country Song Performer(s) Composer(s) Final result Points
Artistic Award  Serbia "Molitva" Marija Šerifović Vladimir Graić
Saša Milošević Mare
1st 268
Composers Award  Hungary "Unsubstantial Blues" Magdi Rúzsa Magdi Rúzsa
Imre Mózsik
9th 128
Press Award  Ukraine "Dancing Lasha Tumbai" Verka Serduchka Verka Serduchka 2nd 235

OGAE

OGAE is an international organisation which conducts a voting poll for the favourite songs among its members before the annual contest. It consists of a network of over 40 Eurovision Song Contest fan clubs across Europe and beyond.[46][47] Below is the top five overall results, after all the votes had been cast.[48]

Country Song Performer(s) Composer(s) OGAE result Eurovision Ranking
 Serbia "Molitva" Marija Šerifović Vladimir Graić, Saša Milošević Mare 184 1st
 Belarus "Work Your Magic" Dmitry Koldun Philip Kirkorov, Karen Kavaleryan 159 6th
  Switzerland "Vampires Are Alive" DJ BoBo DJ BoBo 156 20th in Semi-Final
 Cyprus "Comme ci, comme ça" Evridiki Dimitris Korgialas, Poseidonas Giannopoulos 142 15th in Semi-Final
 Greece "Yassou Maria" Sarbel Alex Papakonstantinou, Marcus Englöf, "Mack" 107 7th
  • Table reflects the corrected result of Switzerland since the cited source had a calculation error.

Barbara Dex Award

The Barbara Dex Award is a humorous fan award given to the worst dressed artist each year. Named after Belgium's representative who came last in the 1993 contest, wearing her self-designed dress, the award was handed by the fansite House of Eurovision from 1997 to 2016 and is being carried out by the fansite songfestival.be since 2017.

Country Song Performer(s) Composer(s)
 Ukraine "Dancing Lasha Tumbai" (Dancing Лаша Тумбай) Verka Serduchka Andriy Danylko

Official album

Eurovision Song Contest: Helsinki 2007
ESC 2007 album cover.jpg
Compilation album by
Released20 April 2007
GenrePop
Length
  • 63:13 (CD 1)
  • 62:50 (CD 2)
LabelCMC
Eurovision Song Contest chronology
Eurovision Song Contest: Athens 2006
(2006)
Eurovision Song Contest: Helsinki 2007
(2007)
Eurovision Song Contest: Belgrade 2008
(2008)

Eurovision Song Contest: Helsinki 2007 was the official compilation album of the 2007 Contest, put together by the European Broadcasting Union and released by CMC International on 20 April 2007. The album featured all 42 songs that entered in the 2007 contest, including the semi-finalists that failed to qualify into the grand final.[49]

Charts

Chart (2007) Peak
position
German Compilation Albums (Offizielle Top 100)[50] 3

Notes

  1. ^ Contains words in French and Spanish
  2. ^ Although the song was performed in English, the title and sentence in the lyrics "Ven a bailar conmigo" is in Spanish.
  3. ^ Contains words in English
  4. ^ The song is entirely in English but the title is in Greek

References

  1. ^ a b "Opening and interval acts known". esctoday.com. 13 April 2007. Archived from the original on 7 October 2011. Retrieved 30 May 2011.
  2. ^ "Eurovision EBU Press conference". esctoday.com.
  3. ^ a b ESC 2007 Event page, ESCKaz.com
  4. ^ a b EXCLUSIVE: Monaco withdraws, 12 December 2006, ESCtoday.com
  5. ^ The 2007 Eurovision Song Contest theme is True Fantasy Archived 8 May 2007 at the Wayback Machine, 27 November 2006, YLE
  6. ^ Eurovision.tv meets dog design Archived 24 February 2007 at the Wayback Machine, Eurovision.tv
  7. ^ a b "Eurovision Song Contest 2007". The Diggiloo Thrush. Retrieved 5 March 2012.
  8. ^ "Semi-Final of Helsinki 2007". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  9. ^ "Grand Final of Helsinki 2007". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  10. ^ "Results of the Semi-Final of Helsinki 2007". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  11. ^ "Results of the Grand Final of Helsinki 2007". European Broadcasting Union. Archived from the original on 22 April 2021. Retrieved 22 April 2021.
  12. ^ Viniker, Barry (12 March 2007). "The voting running order revealed". ESCToday. Archived from the original on 14 March 2007. Retrieved 29 November 2009.
  13. ^ Barak, Itamar (19 April 2007). "Former MTV Europe VJ to present Israel's votes". ESCToday. Retrieved 22 February 2020.
  14. ^ "Imprimir". Normalitzacio.cat. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  15. ^ a b c Christian Masson. "2007 – Helsinki". Songcontest.free.fr. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  16. ^ "• Pogledaj temu – Prijedlog – Eurosong večer(i) na HRT-u!". Forum.hrt.hr. 27 March 2011. Archived from the original on 14 March 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  17. ^ Savvidis, Christos (OGAE Cyprus)
  18. ^ Vi tager MGP dødsens alvorligt, BT.dk
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2 September 2011. Retrieved 7 February 2016.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  20. ^ [1] Archived 30 January 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  21. ^ Julkaistu To, 29 April 2010 – 10:19 (29 April 2010). "YLE Radio Suomen kommentaattorit | Euroviisut | yle.fi | Arkistoitu". yle.fi. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  22. ^ "Dr. Peter Urban kommentiert – Düsseldorf 2011". Duesseldorf2011.de. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  23. ^ "Thomas Mohr: Mit Dschinghis Khan im Garten". Eurovision.de. 14 May 2011. Retrieved 28 October 2012.
  24. ^ "Tim Frühling: Protokoll eines Dramas". 18 April 2011. Retrieved 28 October 2012.
  25. ^ "Fréttablaðið, 12 May 2007". Timarit.is. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  26. ^ "RTE so lonely after loss of Gerry – Marty". 20 May 2010. Retrieved 29 May 2010. He has been providing commentary for Irish viewers since 2000 and maintains great enthusiasm for the much lampooned contest.
  27. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 2007". RTÉ News.
  28. ^ [2] Archived 12 February 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  29. ^ www.eurovisionartists.nl. "Welkom op de site van Eurovision Artists". Eurovisionartists.nl. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  30. ^ [3] Archived 26 January 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  31. ^ DODAJ OGŁOSZENIE Ogłoszenie już od 200zł! (10 May 2007). "Eurowizja 2007 w Jedynce". Wirtualnemedia.pl. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  32. ^ "Comentadores Do ESC – escportugalforum.pt.vu | o forum eurovisivo português". 21595.activeboard.com. Archived from the original on 21 April 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  33. ^ "FORO FESTIVAL DE EUROVISIÓN • Ver Tema – Uribarri comentarista Eurovision 2010". Eurosongcontest.phpbb3.es. Archived from the original on 17 March 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  34. ^ "Infosajten.com". Infosajten.com. Archived from the original on 18 July 2012. Retrieved 9 August 2012.
  35. ^ "Swedes stay at home with Eurovision fever". The Local. 16 May 2009. Archived from the original on 15 May 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  36. ^ Granger, Anthony. "Gibraltar: GBC Explains Eurovision Broadcasts from 2006 to 2008". Eurovoix. Retrieved 9 May 2019.
  37. ^ Eurovision to be aired in Australia 1 April 2007, ESCtoday.com
  38. ^ "SBSAReport_07_Web.indd" (PDF). sbs.com.au. SBS. Archived from the original (PDF) on 16 February 2008.
  39. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest Germany 2011 | News – Azerbaijan to debut in 2008?". Esctoday.com. Retrieved 30 May 2010.
  40. ^ ESC Today, 2003 Archived 20 July 2015 at the Wayback Machine
  41. ^ Technical Partners Appointed for Eurovision Song Contest Archived 2 May 2007 at the Wayback Machine, 16 March 2007
  42. ^ Eurovision Song Contest 2007 schedule, BBC
  43. ^ "HDTV". svt.se.
  44. ^ "Marcel Bezençon Award – an introduction". Poplight. Archived from the original on 17 October 2013. Retrieved 2 June 2009.
  45. ^ "Marcel Bezençon Awards–Eurovision Song Contest". eurovision.tv. Retrieved 19 March 2021.
  46. ^ "Eurovision Fanclub Network". OGAE. Retrieved 15 June 2012.
  47. ^ "Klubi-info: Mikä ihmeen OGAE?" [The club info: What on Earth is OGAE?] (in Finnish). OGAE Finland. 5 June 2012. Retrieved 17 June 2012.
  48. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20070707074315/http://www.esctoday.com/news/read/8436
  49. ^ Hoyler, Steve (23 April 2007). "The Official Eurovision Song Contest Album is here". esctoday.com. ESCToday. Retrieved 5 November 2014.
  50. ^ "Eurovision Song Contest 2007". Offiziellecharts.de. GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved 17 March 2018.

External links

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