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Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign
Elizabeth Warren 2020 presidential campaign logo.svg
Campaign2020 United States presidential election (Democratic Party primaries)
CandidateElizabeth Warren
U. S. Senator from Massachusetts (2013–present)
AffiliationDemocratic Party
EC formedDecember 31, 2018
AnnouncedFebruary 9, 2019
HeadquartersCharlestown, Massachusetts[1]
Key peopleRoger Lau (campaign manager)[2]
Dan Geldon (chief of staff)[3]
Caitlin Mitchell (senior digital organizer)[4]
Emily Parcell[5]
Joe Rospars[4]
Janice Rottenberg[5]
Tessa Simonds[4]
Tracey Lewis[4]
Richard McDaniel[4]
Kane Miller[5]
Brendan Summers[5]
Slogan"Persist"
"Dream Big Fight Hard"
"I have a plan for that" (unofficial slogan)[6]
Website
elizabethwarren.com

Elizabeth Warren's 2020 campaign began with her announcement, on December 31, 2018, that she had formed an exploratory committee to investigate a potential bid for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020.[7] On February 9, 2019, Warren officially announced her run at a rally in Lawrence, Massachusetts, at the site of the 1912 Bread and Roses Strike.[8][9] Warren is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts, and has been considered a top contender for the 2020 Democratic nomination for President.[10]

Background

During the run-up to the 2016 presidential elections, Warren was widely believed by political commentators to be planning a run for the Democratic primaries and she was seen as one of the favorites to win the Democratic nomination, due to her popularity among the progressive wing of the party.[11][12] However, she decided not to enter the race, claiming she “wanted to stay buckled down and keep doing [her] job” in the Senate.[13] Despite this, Warren later stated in an interview with Bloomberg Businessweek on July 25, 2019 that she would've accepted a role on the 2016 Democratic Presidential ticket as Vice President if nominee Hillary Clinton had offered it to her.[14][15]

Speculation continued even after she explicitly denied plans to join the Democratic fray, with headlines such as "Should we believe Elizabeth Warren when she says she won’t run for president?" appearing in the press.[16][17] She stopped short of claiming that she would "never" run for the office of President, paving the way for a future attempt at the White House.[16][18]

Warren vigorously campaigned for Hillary Clinton and took an active role in the 2016 presidential election. She remarked that Donald Trump, the Republican presumptive nominee, was dishonest, uncaring, and "a loser".[19][20][21] A Clinton campaign memo obtained by Bloomberg Businessweek confirmed that Warren was one of the people under consideration to be Clinton's choice for Vice President,[14] though this ultimately went to Virginia Senator Tim Kaine. In December 2016, Warren gained a seat on the Senate Armed Services Committee, termed by The Boston Globe to be "a high-profile perch on one of the chamber's most powerful committees" which will "fuel speculation about a possible 2020 bid for president".[22]

The media speculation regarding her campaign further increased her profile and widened the appeal of her platform among voters, leading CNBC to claim that she was "the real winner of the 2016 election".[23]

Warren was named as part of the "Hell-No Caucus" by Politico in 2018, along with Senators Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, and Bernie Sanders, given she voted "overwhelmingly to thwart his [Trump's] nominees for administration jobs", such as with Rex Tillerson, Betsy DeVos, and Mike Pompeo; all of the Senators in this group were considered potential 2020 presidential contenders at this point in time.[24] At a town hall meeting in Holyoke, Massachusetts on September 29, 2018, Warren said that "[a]fter November 6, I will take a hard look at running for president", referencing the date of the 2018 United States elections.[25][26]

Campaign

Warren speaking at the 2019 Iowa Democrats Hall of Fame Celebration in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on June 9
Warren speaking at the 2019 Iowa Democrats Hall of Fame Celebration in Cedar Rapids, Iowa on June 9

Warren is regarded as the first major Democrat to announce the formation of an exploratory committee, which she did in a video on December 30, 2018.[27] In this video, she says that "America's middle class is under attack" in explaining her populist economic agenda, indirectly referring to her recently proposed Accountable Capitalism Act.[28]

News reports soon after the announcement noted that Republicans have often criticized Warren for her liberal economic positions and the controversy around her claim of Native American ancestry; political commentator Peter Beinart wrote that Warren's low approval rating, only around 30% at that time, reflected "the deeper discomfort that Americans again and again express with ambitious women".[29] Columnist and political commentator Karol Markowicz disagreed with Beinart's view, describing Warren as "stern, abrasive and unfriendly," dismissing claims of sexism.[30]

Roger Lau is her campaign manager, which makes him the first Asian-American campaign manager for a major American Presidential candidate.[31]

On February 9, 2019, Warren officially announced her run at a rally at the Everett Mills in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the site of the 1912 Bread and Roses strike.[9]

Commenting on her campaign, The New York Times said that Warren "is signaling to party leaders that, far from wanting to stage a 'political revolution' in the fashion of Mr. Sanders, she wants to revive the beleaguered Democratic National Committee and help recapture the Senate while retaining the House in 2020." The Times also wrote that "with phone calls, texts and handwritten notes, the Massachusetts senator is continuing an unusually determined outreach effort to show party officials she is aligned with them" and that "many of the officials she is courting are so-called superdelegates, who are able to cast a binding vote should the primary go beyond a first ballot."[32]

In early October 2019, the campaign fired its national organizing director, Rich McDaniel, for allegations of "inappropriate behavior" following an investigation by outside counsel.[33]

During the campaign, Warren asserted that she had been fired from her first teaching job after the school's principal became aware that she was pregnant at the end of the 1971 school year. In October 2019, multiple media outlets discovered school board meeting minutes indicating that Warren's employer had offered her a position for the 1971-1972 school year, and that her resignation was later "accepted with regret" by the board.[34] Warren stood by her account.[35]

Endorsements

Political positions

Anti-corruption

Warren's campaign website says she will "end lobbying as we know it by closing loopholes so everyone who lobbies must register, shining sunlight on their activities, banning foreign governments from hiring Washington lobbyists, and shutting down the ability of lobbyists to move freely in and out of government jobs." She promises to "shut the revolving door between Wall Street and Washington" by banning Congresspeople from trading stocks while in office and becoming lobbyists once they are out of office. Warren also supports requiring every candidate for federal office to post their tax returns online for public viewing and strengthening the code of ethics for Supreme Court justices and the code of conduct for all other federal judges.[36][better source needed]

Economy

A fellow at the Roosevelt Institute sums up Warren's economic ideology as follows:

[W]e should select the tool appropriate to each economic problem we face and not decide ahead of time that the same solution is appropriate.[37]

She has rejected the "socialist" label and has said previously she is "a capitalist to [her] bones".[37]

Warren has cosponsored a bill raising the U.S. minimum wage to $15 an hour.[37]

Taxes

Warren supports an "Ultra-Millionaire Tax" on the 75,000 richest families in the U.S. (those with net worth greater than $50 million) that she says would result in $250 billion a year in federal revenue.[38] She proposes using that extra funding to provide universal childcare and a pre-K program that mirrors the universal high school movement of the early 20th century,[38] relief of student loan debt, and down payments on a Green New Deal and Medicare for All. Additionally, she says a historic investment in housing would result in rents decreasing by 10% nationwide and 1.5 million new jobs.[36][better source needed]

Former top economic adviser to Obama and both Clintons, Gene Sperling has said "This type of wealth tax is essential." David Leonhardt wrote that "Warren is trying to treat not just the symptoms but the underlying disease."[38]

Working class

Warren supports transferring corporate power to workers. She considers herself a defender of the middle class, saying in her announcement video that "America's middle class is under attack." Recent legislation she has submitted would make it easier for Americans to form and join labor unions.[37]

She supports and recently introduced legislation requiring U.S. corporations worth more than $1 billion to allow their employees to select 40% of their board of directors. This is an attempt to get more money flowing back into the pockets of regular workers instead of corporate leaders. It would also require that shareholders approve any corporate funds being donated to political candidates.[37]

Jobs

Warren supports the proposed Green New Deal which Warren states will create jobs and fight climate change. She says some of the extra funding from her proposed tax on "ultra-millionaires" could be used to begin paying for this, as well as using some to create 1.5 million new jobs.[36][better source needed]

Monopolies and government intervention

She does not support U.S. government-takeover of certain industries. Instead, she wants to restructure markets, reflecting her view that the economy has been dominated by a select few individuals and that the government can reform it to make it more competitive. Her focus has been specifically on breaking up what, in her view, are monopolies in the technology sector through stronger antitrust enforcement. She has specifically called out Apple, Facebook,[38] Google, and Amazon. She has also pushed for more competition and government involvement in the healthcare industry.[37]

Elections

Warren supports the passage of an amendment to the U.S. Constitution to "protect the right of every American citizen to vote and have that vote counted." She also supports outlawing "unnecessary and unjustified" regulations that increase the difficulty of voting. She supports a ban on gerrymandering.[36] She has also called for the abolition of the Electoral College in favor of a national popular vote in presidential elections.[39]

Warren also supports overturning the Supreme Court decision on Citizens United v. FEC, outlawing political donations made by federal lobbyists and PACs, and completely banning Super PACs.[36][better source needed]

Impeachment

Warren was one of the first major candidates to call for the impeachment of President Trump.[6] On April 19, 2019 she tweeted, "The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty. That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the President of the United States."[40]

Foreign policy

Warren opposes President Trump's renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, known as the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, "unless he produces a better deal for America's working families".[36][better source needed]

Warren acknowledges the need for a strong military for deterrent purposes, and says the U.S. must maintain vigilance regarding the threat of terrorism, but she says she wants to bring the troops home. She says in doing so, the U.S. government must ensure they get the support and benefits they're owed. She also says she supports "cutting our bloated defense budget" and cutting the hold by defense contractors on military policy. She opposes "endless wars".[36]

She advocates "reinvesting in diplomacy" and multilateralism on issues of shared interests with allies.[36] Warren has stated that "no foreign country should be able to purchase farmland in America," which she claims are dominating the United States agricultural sector.[41]

Housing

Warren supports federal funding for the construction of millions of new homes. She has also introduced legislation that would reward local governments for relaxing restrictive zoning codes that prevent the building of new homes. The plan also calls for further investment in affordable-housing projects, with a specific focus on assisting black families who have historically been hurt by federal housing guidelines.[37]

She says some of the extra funding from her proposed tax on "ultra-millionaires" could be used to begin lowering rents.[36][better source needed]

Healthcare

Warren supports a proposal by Senator Bernie Sanders that would require the U.S. government to provide health insurance to every U.S. citizen, a program known as Medicare-for-all.[37] She says some of the extra funding from her proposed tax on "ultra-millionaires" could be used to begin paying for this.[36]

Drug costs

Warren has advocated for the U.S. government to begin producing prescription drugs as a way to lower drug costs in the U.S. She has introduced legislation that would give the government the ability to produce generic versions of certain drugs, the name-brand versions of which are much more expensive.[37]

Opioid epidemic response

In response to the national opioid epidemic, Warren has called for the U.S. government to assist in the treatment of more addicted Americans. Additionally, her plan calls for $100 billion in federal funds to be directed into fighting the opioid crisis over 10 years.[37]

Judicial Issues

Criminal justice reform

Warren supports criminal justice reform stopping racial disparity in the justice system, banning private prisons, utilizing community policing, and demilitarizing local police departments. She also supports comprehensive sentencing reform and the legalization of marijuana.[36]

Economic crime

Warren was a major player in the establishment of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. She is expected to highlight related legislation she has introduced to further eliminate white-collar crime. One such bill would create a law enforcement unit to specifically investigate crimes at big banks and financial institutions. It would also require senior executives of banks with more than $10 billion in assets to certify each year that they "found no criminal conduct or civil fraud within the financial institutions."[37]

Warren has also introduced legislation with Republican Senator James Lankford (OK) requiring federal agencies to release more information in regards to closed federal investigations and cases against bad corporate actors.[37]

Warren supports "new laws and a new commitment" to investigating and prosecuting large corporations and their leaders. She emphasizes the protection of customers and workers and stopping monopolies from forming.[36][better source needed]

References

  1. ^ "Elizabeth Warren has opened her presidential campaign headquarters in Charlestown". April 10, 2019. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved April 30, 2019.
  2. ^ Warren, Elizabeth [@ewarren] (February 13, 2019). "Roger is a person of deep integrity, someone who always tells the truth and who never makes a promise that he doesn't keep. I'm grateful and honored to have him in this fight" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  3. ^ Lee, M.J. [@mj_lee] (February 13, 2019). "Dan Geldon, Warren's longtime aide and former Senate chief of staff, will serve as chief of staff on the presidential campaign" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  4. ^ a b c d e Korecki, Natasha; Thompson, Alex (January 15, 2019). "Warren stocks campaign with top party talent". Politico. Archived from the original on February 12, 2019. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  5. ^ a b c d "Elizabeth Warren makes key 2020 hires ahead of 1st Iowa trip". Boston Herald. January 2, 2019. Archived from the original on February 12, 2019. Retrieved February 10, 2019.
  6. ^ a b Goodwin, Liz; Bidgood, Jess (June 18, 2019). "As Elizabeth Warren makes gains in the primary, Trumpworld takes notice". The Boston Globe. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  7. ^ Linskey, Annie; Johnson, Jenna (December 31, 2018). "Warren's jump into the presidential campaign kicks the 2020 race into high gear". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  8. ^ Tennant, Paul (February 4, 2019). "Off and running: Warren launches presidential bid in Lawrence". newburyportnews.com. Archived from the original on February 10, 2019. Retrieved February 11, 2019.
  9. ^ a b "Elizabeth Warren kicks off presidential bid with challenge to super wealthy — and other Democrats". CNN. Archived from the original on February 9, 2019. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  10. ^ "Analysis | The top 15 Democratic presidential candidates for 2020, ranked". Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 10, 2018. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  11. ^ Swaine, Jon (July 18, 2014). "'Run, Liz, run!' Elizabeth Warren plays down 2016 bid despite growing chorus". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on January 5, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  12. ^ "Democrats need Elizabeth Warren's voice in 2016 presidential race - The Boston Globe". BostonGlobe.com. March 22, 2015. Archived from the original on January 5, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  13. ^ DeCosta-Klipa, Nik (April 13, 2017). "Here's why Elizabeth Warren didn't run for president in 2016". Boston.com. Archived from the original on January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Joshua Green (July 25, 2019). "Elizabeth Warren Has a Radical Plan to Beat Trump at His Own Game". Bloomberg Businessweek. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  15. ^ Quint Forgey (July 25, 2019). "Warren: I would've accepted a VP offer from Clinton". Politico. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Prokop, Andrew (January 13, 2015). "Should we believe Elizabeth Warren when she says she won't run for president?". Vox. Archived from the original on January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  17. ^ Frum, David (January 13, 2015). "Elizabeth Warren says she's not running for president. But she can run. She should run. And despite her denials, she probably will". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on January 5, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  18. ^ Lawrence, Jill (January 8, 2015). "Why Warren Won't Run". POLITICO Magazine. Archived from the original on August 22, 2015. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  19. ^ Sargent, Greg. "Elizabeth Warren just absolutely shredded Donald Trump. There's a lot more like this to come" Archived March 31, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. The Washington Post. May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  20. ^ Wright, David. "Warren blasts Trump; he calls her 'Pocahontas'" Archived April 12, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. CNN. May 25, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  21. ^ Mimms, Sarah. "Elizabeth Warren Slams 'Loser' Donald Trump in Twitter Tirade" Archived July 30, 2018, at the Wayback Machine. Vice. March 21, 2016. Retrieved May 26, 2016.
  22. ^ McGrane, Victoria (December 14, 2016). "Warren raises foreign policy profile with Armed Services assignment". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on April 1, 2019. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  23. ^ Novak, Jake (October 18, 2016). "Elizabeth Warren is the winner of election 2016—Commentary". www.cnbc.com. Archived from the original on January 4, 2019. Retrieved January 4, 2019.
  24. ^ Schor, Elana; Lin, Jeremy C.F. "The Hell-No Caucus: How five 2020 contenders voted on Trump's nominees". Politico. Archived from the original on April 7, 2018. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  25. ^ Segers, Grace (September 29, 2018). "Elizabeth Warren says she will take a "hard look" at running for president after midterms". CBS News. Archived from the original on January 7, 2019. Retrieved January 15, 2019.
  26. ^ DeBonis, Mike (September 29, 2018). "Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she will take 'hard look' at presidential run". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 1, 2019. Retrieved December 31, 2018.
  27. ^ Herndon, Astead W.; Burns, Alexander (December 3, 2018). "Elizabeth Warren Announces Iowa Trip as She Starts Running for President in 2020". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 31, 2018. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  28. ^ Lach, Eric (December 31, 2018). "Elizabeth Warren Steps Forward". The New Yorker. Archived from the original on December 31, 2018. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  29. ^ Beinart, Peter (January 2, 2019). "There's a Reason Many Voters Have Negative Views of Warren—But the Press Won't Tell You Why". The Atlantic. Archived from the original on January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 3, 2019. The better explanation for why Warren attracts disproportionate conservative criticism, and has disproportionately high disapproval ratings, has nothing to do with her progressive economic views or her dalliance with DNA testing. It's that she's a woman.
  30. ^ Karol Markowicz (January 6, 2019). "No, it's not sexist to call Elizabeth Warren 'unlikable'". New York Post. Archived from the original on March 17, 2019. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  31. ^ 2h2 hours ago (2019). "ASPIRE PAC on Twitter: "Congratulations to @RogerLau, the first Asian-American to be named campaign manager for any major Presidential candidate! #AAPI #RepresentationMatters". Twitter.com. Archived from the original on April 27, 2019. Retrieved February 21, 2019.
  32. ^ Martin, Jonathan (August 26, 2019). "What Elizabeth Warren Is Quietly Telling Democratic Insiders". The New York Times. Retrieved September 21, 2019.
  33. ^ Thompson, Alex (October 4, 2019). "Warren campaign fires senior staffer for 'inappropriate behavior'". Politico. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  34. ^ https://www.cbsnews.com/news/elizabeth-warren-pregnancy-claim-democratic-presidential-candidate-stands-by-being-pushed-out-of-teaching-job/
  35. ^ https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/politics/2019/10/08/elizabeth-warren-cites-pregnancy-discrimination-new-questions-surface-about-old-job-loss/jxrvPxzsu0eSgKbXIv9Z0O/story.html
  36. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Elizabeth Warren Reiterates Support For Marijuana Legalization". Elizabeth Warren.
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Stein, Jeff (December 31, 2018). "Warren's 2020 agenda: Break up monopolies, give workers control over corporations, fight drug companies". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on February 7, 2019. Retrieved February 6, 2019.
  38. ^ a b c d Leonhardt, David, "Capitalism Needs Elizabeth Warren," The New York Times, March 17, 2019
  39. ^ Burke, Michael (March 18, 2019). "Warren calls for abolishing Electoral College". The Hill. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved March 31, 2019.
  40. ^ "Elizabeth Warren". Twitter. April 19, 2019. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  41. ^ Maxwell Strachan (March 30, 2019). "Elizabeth Warren: 'No Foreign Country Should Be Able To Purchase Farmland In America'". Huffington Post. Archived from the original on May 4, 2019. Retrieved May 6, 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 25 October 2019, at 18:16
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